: : : : Pokémon Red / Blue / Green FAQ/Walkthrough

Pokémon Red / Blue / Green FAQ/Walkthrough

by KeyBlade999   Updated to v3.10 on

  • Games: Pokémon Red Version, Pokémon Blue Version, and Pokémon Green Version
  • Console: Nintendo GameBoy (and Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console)
  • File Type: Formatted FAQ/Walkthrough
  • Author: KeyBlade999 (a.k.a. Daniel Chaviers)
  • Version: [[Version History|v3.10]]
  • Time of Update: 7:24 AM 2/5/2016



Donations

While I do write all of my guides for free, it does take a lot of time and effort to put them together. If you're feeling generous and want to show your appreciation, I am gladly accepting donations. I don't know exactly what the donations will be used for, but just know that you would definitely be helping me make more quality FAQs! Even the smallest donation amounts are appreciated, and they are a great way to say how much you appreciate the work I do. If you do decide you'd like to donate, please send the donations through PayPal at the e-mail address listed below. Thank you so very much for at least considering this!!


Donation/Contact E-Mail

keyblade999.faqs@gmail.com





Introduction

Welcome to another of my many, many Pokémon FAQs. This FAQ covers the first of the Pokémon games: Pokémon Red, Blue, and Green Versions. I have become rather well-known for FAQing many Pokémon games: indeed, I have already covered all of the mainstream Pokémon games by now (2014), and most of the side-games. I had originally covered Pokémon Red, Blue, and Green once before, back in 2012. However, there was something that prompted me to relook and review my FAQ: the news that the Cerulean Cave in Pokémon Red/Green in Japan differed from the one in Pokémon Red/Blue that I originally FAQed. Even today, my decision to FAQ Pokémon R/B/G, long after it had been seemingly well-covered, was not a welcomed one; in part, I mostly did it just because I wanted to. So, in a way, I guess I can justify it by covering the new Cerulean Cave decently. It's not a lot of justification, but practically no other FAQ has even acknowledged the existence of two Cerulean Caves.

Lame intro, huh? >_> Well, enjoy the rest of the good stuff.





Basics of the Game

A Must-Read Before the Basics

When you use the Basics section, keep in mind what it entails: there is a LOT on that Table of Contents, a lot of competitively-relevant info. I mostly chose to include a few of the following sections on the Controls and Save Data for the sake of their common usage: people tend to look these things up most often for whatever reason. That aside, most of the other stuff - like how to operate menus and the like - is in the game's e-manual.

What this section does is operate on a different level. These sections will mostly analyze the game from one of three aspects: the mechanical aspect (such as the formulas for damage), the competitive aspect (playing Pokémon very well against other well-versed players), and a mixture thereof. If you do not plan on playing against other people competitively or do not plan on playing in the Battle Maison for extended periods of time, do not bother using those sections. I have gotten complaints regarding the length of the Basics section on the whole, so I feel the need for you to remember that this section is not required reading unless you want to understand various mechanical/strategic aspects of the game (or view a little trivia). If you plan to play the game only to play the game, you'll be better off consulting the e-manual than this guide for the basic info.

I do, of course, provide a Walkthrough that will help walk you through the game's plot, step by step, without this mechanic info.



Controls

Button Resultant Effects
D-Pad/Circle Pad Move your character.
Move cursors.
A Button Confirm choices.
Speak with people.
Investigate the tile ahead.
B Button Decline choices.
Exit menus.
Press during Pokémon evolution to cancel said evolution.
Start Button Open a menu.
Select Button N/A


Type Chart



Important Terms & Definitions

(In case you're unaware, this section was drafted when the Pokémon Red/Blue/Green/Yellow games were released on the Nintendo eShop or thereabouts, so take the 20 years since then into context.)

Pokémon is itself a very technical game. While we will get deeper into these technicalities in other sections of this conglomerate of "basics" and in the various appendices, it would be first be most prudent to give you, the readers, a quick list of what will be referred to throughout the guide. Those familiar with the competitive scene of Pokémon need no real introduction to most of these terms, and most having played Pokémon in general will only need to give this a quick glance at times; however, everyone else should give this section at least a decent read-over, especially those of you who are new to Pokémon. There are several definitions here some of you may find surprising and in themselves immensely helpful to understanding Pokémon in general, and by far much more in-depth than what the game will likely ever yield unto you. >_>

In any case, if you think something else should be added here, feel free to e-mail me.


MAINSTREAM GAME NAME ABBREVIATIONS & REGIONS
Generation Games' Full Names In-Game Regions Consoles Common Abbreviations
Gen. I Pokémon Red, Blue, Green, and Yellow Versions Kanto GameBoy Pokémon R/B/G/Y
Gen. II Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal Versions Johto & Kanto GameBoy Color Pokémon G/S/C
Gen. III Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald Versions Hoenn GameBoy Advance Pokémon R/S/E
Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen Versions Kanto & Sevii Isles GameBoy Advance Pokémon FR/LG
Gen. IV Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum Versions Sinnoh Nintendo DS Pokémon D/P/Pt
Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver Versions Johto & Kanto Nintendo DS Pokémon HG/SS
Gen. V Pokémon Black and White Versions Unova Nintendo DS Pokémon B/W -or- Pokémon B1/W1
Pokémon Black and White Versions 2 Unova Nintendo DS Pokémon B/W 2 -or- Pokémon B2/W2
Gen. VI Pokémon X and Y Kalos Nintendo 3DS Pokémon X/Y
Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire Hoenn Nintendo 3DS Pokémon OR/AS*
NOTE (*): Sometimes, you'll also see the uppercase Greek "omega" for "O" and lowercase Greek "alpha" for "A"

  • #HKO: Indicates a KO (defeat) in # hits. For example, 1HKO (sometimes OHKO) implies a one-hit win.

  • Accuracy: The preset hit rate each move has for itself that determines how likely it is to hit. In general, this can be seen as a percentage: for example, Stone Edge has 80 Accuracy so it could be seen as having an 80% hit rate. A move with a 100% hit rate is generally always going to hit. However, this is only when you assume that your accuracy has not been changed by certain moves or your foe's evasion. Certain moves - usually status moves, but a niche few others - will ignore accuracy and evasion entirely, and always hit.

  • Attack (Atk.): Attack is one of the stats a Pokémon can have. Attack will affect the damage dealt by certain moves: that is, physical moves. Physical moves are those that deal damage and are of the Normal, Fighting, Flying, Ground, Rock, Bug, Ghost, or Poison types.

  • Base Stat (sometimes "BS" or "base"): Base stats are used to indicate the general prowess of a Pokémon in a particular stat. Base stats can range from 1 to 255 in a given stat. For most people, a base value of 110+ indicates that the Pokémon is good in that stat, though it all relates back to the Trainer's own strategy. In any case, the higher a base stat, the better for the user.

  • Base Stat Total (BST): The total of a Pokémon's base stats, used to communicate its general prowess. Depending on the Pokémon, however, its actual strategic value may be skewed because of certain high base stats. For example, Shuckle's base 230 in Defense and Sp. Def. really skews it BST up somewhat higher than its actual strategic value would indicate (almost no one really uses it).

  • Catch Rate: A hidden charateristic of all Pokémon that helps to determine how likely you are to catch it, ranging from 1 to 255 (where 255 is best for you). See the Pokémon Capture section for some more details.

  • Class: Class is an attribute given to moves: it determines the move's own nature and what stats its damage is based on. There are three classes: Physical, Special, and Status. Physical moves usually are based on the user's Attack and the target's Defense; Special moves are usually based on the user's Special; and Status moves use neither, but instead affect various other things. Granted, class is not an important characteristic in Generation I, since Physical/Special classification for damaging moves is related only to the type of move.

  • Critical Hit (a.k.a. Critical or just Crit): An attack that does roughly 100% more damage than normal (double damage). When an attack is critical, it will be openly declared as such by the game. Critical hits are related to the Pokémon's base Speed stat, in terms of how often they occur - specifically, the base Speed divided by 512. It is definitely an imbalance in the game one can abuse quite well with faster Pokémon. Critical hits are also influenced by the fact that certain moves like Slash have higher critical-hit rates: EIGHT times higher, in fact. Critical hits also notably ignore Attack losses, from Burns or Growls or whatever may lower it, though it will also ignore any Attack boosts you do have; they also ignore boosts on the foe's defense.

  • Defense (Def.): Defense is one of the stats a Pokémon can have. Defense will affect the damage dealt by certain moves: that is, physical moves. Physical moves are those that deal damage and are of the Normal, Fighting, Flying, Ground, Rock, Bug, Ghost, or Poison types.

  • Dynamic Value (DV): In Generations I and II, only four DVs - which we know today in the modern games as IVs - are found: one each for Attack, Defense, Speed, and Special. One for HP also exists, but it is determined by the other four. These first four are completely random in value, and range from 0-15. HP is calculated by turning that number into binary and taking the "one's" digit of each of those DVs in that order, then using that. So IVs of 1, 3, 5, and 15 (0001, 0011, 0101, and 1111 respectively) yield an HP DV of 15 (1111).

  • Event Pokémon: Event Pokémon are those only given out by Nintendo, Game Freak, or certain other third parties (in particular, GameStop and its subsidaries lately) in real life. Common Pokémon for this include special Shiny Pokémon (i.e. the Shiny Gengar given out in October 2014), those with otherwise illegal moves (i.e. the Pikachu that can Surf and Fly), those that just have special Formes (e.g. the Pokéball-Pattern and Fancy Pattern Vivillons from X/Y), Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Shaymin, Darkrai, Arceus, Victini, Meloetta, Genesect, Diancie, Hoopa, and Volcanion: in general, these Pokémon cannot be obtained in the games at all, and must be obtained by getting it at those particular events or trading with someone who did get one from the same. There are other means for Event Pokémon to be distributed, too, such as the Pokémon Bank Celebi and the Black/White launch Victini, and it doesn't have to be restricted to these legendaries: other Pokémon with certain special characteristics are often distributed. Japan and Korea get most of these distributions, too. In any case, I would recommend checking Bulbanews (http://bulbanews.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Front_page) or Serebii (http://www.serebii.net/) regularly for details on these events.

  • Evolution: When a Pokémon meets certain conditions - usually reaching a certain level, though the methods vary - the Pokémon will evolve. This is usually accompanied by stat boosts, a better set of moves to learn, and so on. The exact conditions for evolution for every Pokémon can be seen in the Pokémon Evolutions section.

  • Experience Points (EXP.): When a Pokémon defeats another in battle, it will earn EXP. By earning enough EXP., the Pokémon will level up and become stronger.

  • Gym Badge: The mark that you have conquered a Pokémon Gym, these will allow you to use certain HMs in the field at times, but otherwise only serve a signatory purpose. Your goal is to collect all eight, one per Gym in the region.

  • Hidden Machine (HM): One a very few special TMs that can teach Pokémon moves that can also be used in the field, like Cut (to cut down trees) and Surf (to cross water). You will need most of these to progress through the game.

  • Hit Points (HP): This refers to a Pokémon's health. HP can go down via a number of means, primarily attacks though certain weather conditions and ailments and even the Pokémon's own moves can also cause loss of HP. As HP is above 50%, the HP bar is green; from 50% to 25%, it is yellow; and from 25% down it is red. These colors indicate the danger the Pokémon's health is in: when it hits 0 HP, the Pokémon is fainted and cannot act, except for the use of HMs in the field. Be sure to keep Pokémon healed with Potions and the like!

  • HM Slave: A Pokémon owned for the sole purpose - at least for the most part - of using HMs. By distributing all of your needed HM moves to a single Pokémon or two, you greatly diversify the main movepool of the others you do use, but at the same time it costs you in overall team variety. It's a give-and-take system; ideally, you'll learn to distribute HMs throughout the team, but it's more than manageable to slave some Pokémon. Common Pokémon in the past have included Zigzagoon and Bidoof's evolutionary chains.

  • Item: An item in the Pokémon series has one of two uses, generally: to be used for an immediate effect, or to be held by a Pokémon for an in-battle use of some sort. See the Items Listings section for more.

  • Legendary Pokémon: A Pokémon whose in-game plot creates some kind of god-like aura about it. For example, Arceus is known as the Pokémon God because he created the universe, therefore he is a legendary Pokémon; Mew is known as the ancestor of most modern Pokémon and can learn any move desired, and therefore is a legendary Pokémon; Groudon is known as the one who rose the continents, and therefore is a legendary Pokémon. A Legendary Pokémon has a storyline behind it that often is the focus of a single game or of a special Nintendo Event, or sometimes even the subject of one of the Pokémon anime's movies. Many times, these Pokémon are strong -- however, do not confuse the label of Legendary Pokémon with strength or strategic validity! Mew, Celebi, and Jirachi, for example, are considered legendary, but they are not particularly strong: it's the plot behind them driving that "legendary" label. Strategic viability and stats usually determine how good a Pokémon is: I can easily beat Mew, Celebi, and Jirachi with non-legendary Pokémon, moreso than the other legends. Another example is how the site Smogon has classed Blaziken - a starter Pokémon - into its "Ubers" tier, a tier largely populated by legendary Pokémon, whereas those I just named are in the "UU" ("underused") tier, two tiers below.

  • Level (originally "L", now "Lv."): The general level of a Pokémon's strength. It rises as EXP. is earned, and can range from 1 to 100, where 100 is the strongest that the Pokémon can get. Glitch Pokémon can range up to Level 255.

  • Move: An attack a Pokémon can use. Most moves are used to deal damage in some way, and others can be used to boost stats or affect statuses, and many of both kinds have additional special affects. See the Move List.

  • Original Trainer (OT): The original owner of a Pokémon, given by their selected in-game name. This isn't a particularly important characteristic, it's just a quick identifier for who gave you what Pokémon. The main issues someone finds in regards to "Is this my Pokémon or not" involves IDs. (See: "Trainer ID & Secret ID")

  • Physical: A move Class that considers the user's Attack and the target's Defense to calculate damage.

  • Pokémon (a.k.a. Pocket Monster): Pokémon are the creatures who live alongside us in the world of Pokémon: as partners, as pets, as friends, as family... Pokémon are the central creatures of all Pokémon games. By catching and training Pokémon, a Pokémon Trainer proves their might both in terms of raising Pokémon and in terms of strategy. It is every Pokémon Trainer's goal to one day beat all eight Pokémon Gyms in their region and then beat the Elite Four to become Pokémon League Champion. To do that, you must learn to understand your Pokémon in every possible way.

  • Pokémon Gym: There are eight Pokémon Gyms across the region, and in each lies a Gym Leader who will give their Gym Badge to someone who defeats them in battle. Each Pokémon Gym specializes in a certain type of Pokémon, and each will normally have some kind of puzzle to overcome. Your goal is to beat all eight Pokémon Gyms, and then beat the Pokémon League.

  • Pokémon League: The pinnacle of Pokémon Trainers -- at least for the in-game storyline. After obtaining all eight Gym Badges, your next task is to come here. Here will lie the Elite Four and the Pokémon League Champion, the top five trainers in the region, who you must beat all in succession; by beating these five, you will prove your might as the best Trainer in the region...

  • Pokémon VGCs: The true pinnacle of Pokémon Training, the Pokémon Video Game Championships, or VGCs, are held yearly, first on the regional level and then the national and worldwide levels. Many thousands of Pokémon game players will come to these events, hoping to prove their might against each as the best Trainer in the world. Winning the VGCs is much different and infinitely more difficult and intricate than playing the actual game. Much of the info in this FAQ/Walkthrough was created for the sole purpose of aiding people understand the in-depth mechanics and general strategy of Pokémon just so you may be able to make that leap from battling the AI skillfully to winning championships against other people who know what they are doing. If you want to figure out info on the Pokémon VGCs, times, and locations, please go to the Pokémon official website, http://www.pokemon.com/.

  • Power (a.k.a. "Base Power" or "BP"): This is the Power stat attributed to a move: the higher, the better for the user of the move. In online forums and such, the abbreviation "BP" is often used as a shorthand: this is not to be mixed-up with the currency BP! For the sake of ease, though, you'll never hear me say "BP" in reference to Base Power throughout this guide. Just be careful when elsewhere.

  • Power Points (PP): PP are like currency for the use of a Pokémon's moves; think of them as the MP from other RPGs like Final Fantasy. By using a move, you will use up 1 PP for that move, or 2 PP if your foe has the ability Pressure. When a move has 0 PP, it cannot be used; if all of your moves hit 0 PP, then the Pokémon is forced to use the move Struggle, which is relatively weak and damages the user heavily. PP-restoring items are generally in limited quantities throughout the game, almost never being buyable or not in any exorbitant amount, so conservation of these Ethers and Elixirs will be very much important come the latter half of the game.

  • Priority: Each move in the game has its own "Priority" stat. Most moves are of a Priority of 0, but some are below or above that number. Pokémon using higher Priority moves will go first before those using lower Priority moves; if two Pokémon use a move of the same Priority, then their Speed will determine who goes first. Priority will even defy the warped turn order that Trick Room provides in the newer games! The Move Priority section contains more info.

  • Same-Type Attack Bonus (STAB): When a Pokémon uses a move that is the same type as itself, the damage of the move is by default increased to 50% higher than normal. For example, Pikachu (an Electric Pokémon) using the move Thunderbolt (an Electric move) will deal 50% extra damage. This is a very significant boost and especially critical in the choice of moves a Pokémon will have. For example a super-effective move might do 120 HP of damage, which will only KO weak Pokémon HP-wise, but with STAB that move can be boosted to 180 HP of damage, which KO's the average Pokémon in competitive play!

  • Shiny: A Pokémon is Shiny if it just outright looks different from how it normally does. For example, Gyarados is blue but Shiny Gyarados is red; Sceptile is green but Shiny Sceptile is cyan; Kyogre is blue but Shiny Kyogre is pink. Shininess is exceedingly rare, usually a 1 in 4,096 chance in these games and it was 1 in 8,192 before the release of Pokémon X/Y in 2013. (There are exceptions.)

  • Single Battle: A battle between two people in which each only has one Pokémon out at a time. Under typical online battle rules and certain other rulesets, you must use three Pokémon total per side. This isn't the case for most in-game battles, though. Every battle in Pokémon Red/Blue/Green/Yellow are Single Battles.

  • Special (1): This definition refers to the Special class of moves - those of the Water, Grass, Fire, Ice, Electric, Psychic, or Dragno types. These moves use your Special stat to deal damage, and also use your target's Special stat to determine the damage as well, creating a minor imbalance. Since Generation II, this stat was split into Special Attack (Sp. Atk.) and Special Defense (Sp. Def.).

  • Speed (sometimes "Spd" or "Spe"): The Speed stat is, in its own way, the most relevant stat to competitive battling. Speed determines turn order in a very simple fashion: whoever has higher Speed goes first, and, if there is a tie in Speed, the two Pokémon tied will have equal chances of moving first. For example, a Pokémon with 210 Speed will almost always move before a Pokémon with 200 Speed; if two Pokémon have 200 Speed, then they are 50% likely to move first. However, this assumes that they are using moves of the same Priority. A further note of importance is that Speed also determines your critical hit rate - the base Speed divided by 512 is the rate of critical hits for you. (See: "Priority", "Critical hit")

  • Stat EXP.: Later known as EVs when the system was changed, stat EXP. is a means of altering your stats. Each Pokémon can earn Stat EXP. in their five stats, and their stat EXP. ranges from 0 to 65536. The growth rate of the stat in question is equal to [sqrt(Stat EXP)] / 4 at Level 100-- at the most, a 64-point gain, just like EVs, but the mechanics are different. EVs are earned from two means -- battles and Vitamins. When defeating a Pokémon in battle, the base stats of the defeated Pokémon are added to the respective Stat EXP. values, so a Mew, for example, will add 100 Stat EXP. to all stats. There is no limit on the total Stat EXP. across all stats, though. Vitamins also can boost Stat EXP. by 2,560 points for a single stat, but not above 25,600 Stat EXP.

  • Status (1): A move Class that does not deal direct damage. It instead says that the move will do something else, based on the move itself.

  • Status (2): Refers to a status condition that often inhibits the afflicted Pokémon; also known as an ailment. You should see the Status Ailments list for full details.

  • Switching In/Out: The act of choosing to switch out a Pokémon currently out with a different one in your party. Doing so has a number of consequences. When used, people usually do it one of several things. One is to eliminate stat changes, infatuation, and confusion, among a few other things from the Pokémon, which can be lethal if left unattended. Another is when the Pokémon is seen as likely to be attacked by a weakness-piercing attack and thus to switch to a Pokémon resisting that move rather than suffering death. For example, say you have Gyarados (Water/Flying) out versus Jolteon (Electric). Jolteon is fast and strong, and most importantly can learn Thunderbolt, which OHKO's Gyarados with ease due to the double-weakness to Electric plus STAB, resulting in 6x damage. By switching to a Ground Pokémon, however, you gain an important advantage and also avoid damage.

  • Technical Machine (TM): An item you can use to teach a Pokémon the move contained on the TM, if the Pokémon can learn it. There are 100 in all, so collect 'em all!

  • Trainer ID & Secret ID: If you check any Pokémon you yourself caught or check your Trainer Card, you'll notice that you have an ID. Everyone has an ID number attached to them, and there are 65536 possible numbers (00000 - 65535). There is also a hidden or "secret" ID you cannot see. It is also randomized, is unlikely to be the same as your seen Trainer ID, and also ranges from 00000 to 65535. The use of two IDs helps to ward off hackers; it also helps to ensure that the odds of any two players getting the same two IDs (both Trainer and Secret) is 1 in 4,294,967,296 (one in about 4 (American) billion chances). The uses of IDs are mostly in terms of breeding and EXP. growth in later generations.

  • Type: Every move in the game will have a type attached to it, and every Pokémon will have one or two types given to it simultaneously. Types are like elements in Pokémon: they determine what is super-effective or resistant to what. For example, you can see Fire moves doing lots of damage to Grass Pokémon, right? And also see how the same Fire-type move would likely deal less damage to a Water Pokémon? While not all type-effectiveness relationships are so simple, they are nonetheless important to learn! There are eighteen types in all: Normal, Fire, Water, Grass, Electric, Ground, Bug, Dark, Psychic, Ghost, Flying, Rock, Ice, Dragon, Fighting, Poison, Steel, and Fairy.

  • Vitamin: A particular type of used item. "Vitamins" is the general term for the items HP Up, Protein, Iron, Calcium, Zinc (in later games), and Carbos, which are items used on Pokémon to raise their stat experience. (See: Stat EXP.)


Version Exclusives

As with other paired Pokémon titles, there are certain things exclusive to each version of the game. Here they are, and they are limited solely to Pokémon.


Pokémon Red Exclusives Pokémon Blue & Green Exclusives
Ekans Sandshrew
Arbok Sandslash
Oddish Vulpix
Gloom Ninetales
Vileplume Meowth
Mankey Persian
Primeape Bellsprout
Growlithe Weepinbell
Arcanine Victreebel
Scyther Magmar
Electabuzz Pinsir


Pokémon Capture

A CATCH RATE CALCULATOR

Go here to see it -- http://www.dragonflycave.com/rbycapturecalc.aspx


Capturing Pokémon is a simple process, albeit a sometimes annoying one in the cases of certain, rarer Pokémon - roaming Pokémon, for example. The game, by tradition, has poorly elaborated on what could be a more delicate process than most would think, especially with one-time-only scenarios. They usually delegate it to "Lower the Pokémon's HP and throw a Pokéball." Unlike later games, it's also a series of steps rather than a straightforward formula. Keep in mind all operations are truncated, so decimals are always left off.

  • Step #1 - Situational Characteristics: These are things based on where and when you're doing this.
    • If the target is a Marowak on Pokémon Tower 6F, the rate is 0%.
    • If the ball used is a Master Ball, the rate is 100%.
    • Otherwise, a random number (R1) is generated, based on the Pokéball used.
      • Poké Ball: 0 to 255
      • Great Ball: 0 to 200
      • Ultra Ball: 0 to 150
      • Safari Ball: 0 to 150

  • Step #2 - Status: Based on the status of the Pokémon. This variable S will be 25 if the target is asleep or frozen, 12 if poisoned, burned, or paralyzed, and 0 otherwise.

  • Step #3 - Capture Chance 1: Find S - R1 to define a new variable CC1 (capture chance one). If S - R1 = CC1 < 0, then the Pokémon is caught. Otherwise, we proceed onward. Some notes:
    • This means that a Poké Ball has, at this point, 1/256 chance to catch an unstatused Pokémon, 13/256 (5%) for S = 12, and (10%) for S = 25.
    • Likewise, the Great Ball has odds of 1/200 (0.5%), 13/200 (6.5%), and 26/200 (13%) respectively.
    • And the Ultra and Safari Balls have odds of 1/150 (0.6%), 13/150 (8.7%), and 26/150 (17.3%).

  • Step #4 - Health: At this point, we calculate the max health factor, MHF. For this, we find the target's Max HP times 255, then divide by a value: 8 if using a Great Ball and 12 otherwise. Then divide by the current health divided by four to determined the current health factor, CHF. Then divided MHF by CHF. Or, in short, (Max HP * 255) / (8 or 12) / (Current HP / 4), or, simpler: (Max HP * 255) / (Currernt HP * (32 or 48)). If this value exceeds 255, it is reduced to 255. We dub this now the HP Factor, F.

  • Step #5 - Base Catch Rate: If the base catch rate of the Pokémon is now less than CC1, capture fails and we skip on to the appropriate step. Otherwise, continue.

  • Step #6 - HP-Based Capture: Another random number R2 is generated. It ranges from 0 to 255. If R2 < F, the Pokémon is captured.

  • Step #7 - Capture Failed: We multiply the Pokémon's catch rate by 100 to help determine the number of wiggles, W. This step is probably pointless to most of you - in any case, it means we failed, and just want to determine the animation of the Pokéball.
    • W is divided by 255 for a Poké Ball, 200 for a Great Ball, and 150 for an Ultra/Safari Ball. If W > 255, the ball wiggles three times.
    • If not, find W * F / 255, then add 5 to this if the Pokémon is poisoned, burned, or paralyzed, or 10 if frozen or asleep. If W < 10, the ball misses altogether. If 10 < W < 29, there is one wiggle. If 30 < W < 69, the ball wiggles twice. If W > 70, the ball wiggles three times.


Status Ailments

There are several ailments that can affect your Pokémon in this game, and many have unnamed effects, as below. Also note that Pokémon can only have one of the main ailments (Paralysis, Burn, Poison, Bad Poisoning, Sleep, KO/Faint) at one time, although the rest can accumulate as much as the person doing the damage allows - and, of course, KO overrides everything. The six ailments are listed first as Major Ailments for that reason. (Not that they're the worst or anything. It just helps to differentiate.) Several more of the Moderate Ailments are named so because they are still often used and often considered ailments, but not are the most threatening and they can stack. And, of course, these are extended to include pretty much anything that would be considered a status (a change to a single Pokémon) by Pokémon Showdown (a great battle sim) - most these would be considered Minor Ailments, which are mostly move- or item-caused with relatively unimportant effects or "duh" effects. Let me know if I forgot something.

Also, keep in mind that the cures are there for a reason. Yes, [[Flash Fire]] may not be a status you'd want to get off of your Pokémon, since it has nothing but benefits. But what if your opponent had the status? Remember, these go both ways, and not all statuses have to (or can) be cured with simple items that you'd be unable to use in normal competition, but also various moves. Switching out, for example, can be done via Roar to hit the opponent, or Parting Shot or U-turn or Volt Switch or more methods for yourself.



Major Ailments



Bad Poisoning


Cures: Antidote (item); Full Heal (item); Full Restore (item); Rest (move);

Immunizers: Being Poisoned, Badly Poisoned, Frozen, Burned, Paralyzed, or KO'd when the ailment is given

Details & Effects: This degree of [[Poison|Poisoning]] is executed via the move Toxic, double-layered Toxic Spikes, or the Toxic Orb, or a random chance from Poison Fang. The HP loss will actually increment on the afflicted Pokémon from 1/16 to 2/16 to 3/16 to 4/16 from there on out, causing death in about five turns without being hit or healed. Otherwise, the same as Poison.


Burn


Cures: Burn Heal (item); Full Heal (item); Full Restore (item); Rest (move)

Immunizers: Being Poisoned, Badly Poisoned, Frozen, Burned, Paralyzed, or KO'd when the ailment is given

Details & Effects: The afflicted Pokémon will lose 12.5% (1/8) of their max HP per turn, essentially causing KO in eight turns for sure barring healing. Additionally, the Pokémon's physical Attack (Atk.) is halved, with all bonuses accounted for. Thus, this status is great for inhibiting strong physical attackers.


Frozen


Cures: Ice Heal (item); Full Heal (item); Full Restore (item); being hit with a Fire-type move; attempting to use a Fire-type move

Immunizers: Being Poisoned, Badly Poisoned, Frozen, Burned, Paralyzed, or KO'd when the ailment is given

Details & Effects: The afflicted Pokémon is absolutely and completely inactive for an indeterminate number of turns. Unlike Sleep, there's only a 20% for the Pokémon to be unfrozen at the start of their turn. When in battle, and they do not thaw out on a turn they attempt to take action in, they are completely left wide-open for damage, which is why this status can be very lethal - at the same time, though, Frozen is only induced via moves that have a 10% ~ 30% chance to do it as compensation. They will be thawed out after some time, when healed via an item, or hit with a Fire-type move of any sort. Using a Fire-type move will also thaw out the afflicted Pokémon, so attempting to freeze Fire-type Pokémon especially tends to be in vain.


KO/Faint


Cures: Revive (item); Max Revive (item)

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: The Pokémon is absolutely unable to act in any way until revived from KO (such as by a Revive). This happens when the Pokémon hits 0 HP, so be sure to keep it high: if all Pokémon in your party hit zero HP, then you lose the battle and return to the last-used Pokémon Center. (The latter only really occurs in in-game battles: in multiplayer battles with other people, you simply lose.) Pokémon who are KO'ed, though, can still use their HM moves in the field.


Paralysis


Cures: Paralyze Heal (item); Full Heal (item); Full Restore (item); Rest (move)

Immunizers: Being Poisoned, Badly Poisoned, Frozen, Burned, Paralyzed, or KO'd when the ailment is given

Details & Effects: This ailment will, most notably, make it where the Pokémon has a 25% chance of doing nothing on a given turn. This will also quarter their Speed (with all boosts accounted for), typically making them the last to move. However, that Speed loss will not affect the priority of their moves, just the order in which they move when there are conflicts in regards to priority.


Poison


Cures: Antidote (item); Full Heal (item); Full Restore (item); Rest (move);

Immunizers: Being Poisoned, Badly Poisoned, Frozen, Burned, Paralyzed, or KO'd when the ailment is given

Details & Effects: The afflicted Pokémon will lose 1/8 (12.5%) of its HP every turn. That's about it, really.


Sleep


Cures: Awakening (item); Poek Flute (item); Full Heal (item); Full Restore (item); waiting several turns

Immunizers: Being Poisoned, Badly Poisoned, Frozen, Burned, Paralyzed, or KO'd when the ailment is given

Details & Effects: The afflicted Pokémon will be unable to act. However, they can act in a manner by choosing the move Sleep Talk or Snore when their turn arises. The loss of action is temporal, but its length is random: it usually lasts around two or three turns, but can range from 1 to 7. The only exception to that is Rest, which is two turns of Sleep. There is little advantage to this beyond Rest-Sleep Talk/Rest-Snore combos. An additional negative effect of Sleeping is that Dream Eater can be used on the Sleeping Pokémon to damage them and absorb HP.



Moderate Ailments




Confused


Cures: Switching out, waiting several turns, Full Heal (item)

Immunizers: Having already been Confused;

Details & Effects: The Pokémon has a chance of hitting itself on a given turn, thus doing damage to itself: the odds seem to be about 25% ~ 50%. This lasts for 1 to 4 turns. Additionally, the damage dealt upon hitting itself will be proportional to the Pokémon's Attack stat, stat boosts and items included, which is why the move Swagger (Confusion, Attack +2 stages) is so effective on physical attackers in later games.


Flinch


Cures: None

Immunizers: Already having flinched in the same turn

Details & Effects: Some moves - Fake Out, most prominently, these days - have a chance to make the opponent Flinch and thus not act on the turn given.



Minor Ailments



Charging & Recharging


Cures: None

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: The Pokémon is either charging up for a move (e.g. Solar Beam, Sky Attack) or is recovering from a move (e.g. Hyper Beam, Blast Burn). Thus, they will not act for one turn. Depending on the move, other effects may be attributed to this.


Disabled


Cures: Switching out, waiting several turns

Immunizers: Having already been disabled

Details & Effects: This simply implies that, for some reason, one of the Pokémon's moves cannot be used: the last-used one.


Digging


Cures: None

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: The Pokémon is using the move Dig, and cannot be hit by most moves - however, Digging Pokémon with Earthquake or Magnitude, each for double the normal power. They will attack on the next turn.


Flying & Bouncing


Cures: None

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: The Pokémon is using the moves Fly or Bounce, and cannot be hit by most moves, barring Thunder, Gust, and Sky Uppercut. They will attack on the next turn.


Imprisoning/Imprisoned


Cures: Defeating the Pokémon doing the Imprisoning

Immunizers: Having already been imprisoned

Details & Effects: The Pokémon being Imprisoned by the move of the same name cannot use any moves known by the Pokémon doing the Imprisoning.


Leech Seed


Cures: Switching out

Immunizers: Having already been hit with Leech Seed

Details & Effects: The Pokémon has been afflicted with Leech Seed, and will lose 1/16 of its max HP every turn, which will be used to heal the user of Leech Seed or whoever switches into his slot. This has an interesting side-effect with Bad Poisoning in that it and Toxic will forcibly increase the other's damage: Toxic does 1/16, then Leech Seed will do 2/16, Toxic later deals 3/16, Leech Seed 4/16... It's deadly.


Light Screen


Cures: Waiting for 5 turns

Immunizers: Having already used Light Screen

Details & Effects: All damage from Special-class attacks is reduced for the afflicted party. The move lasts 5 turns. The damage reduction is by 50% (to half). However, critical hits will be able to go through Light Screen and Reflect, so beware of this.


Protect


Cures: None

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: The Pokémon will not be affected by any moves on the turn when this is used, except for Transform. This has a chance of failing with consecutive use: 1/X, where X is the number of consecutive uses this use of the move will make.


Reflect


Cures: Waiting for 5 turns

Immunizers: Having already used Reflect

Details & Effects: All damage from Physical-class attacks is reduced for the afflicted party. The move lasts 5 turns. The damage reduction is by 50% (to half). However, critical hits will be able to go through Light Screen and Reflect, so beware of this.


Stat Change


Cures: Switching out, or ways to induce the opposite effect (moves/items/etc.), some of which (Haze) remove them all by definition

Immunizers: None!

Details & Effects: The Pokémon has had its statistics changed in some manner or another. The section Stat Changes In Battle is better at explaining this.


Substitute


Cures: Defeating the Substitute; the Infiltrator ability allows ignorance of this

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: Substitutes arise when the move Substitute is used; it will sacrifice 25% of the user's max HP to get out a doll that has the same amount of HP; thus, most Pokémon using this move are often EV-trained for their HP and Defenses, or HP at minimum. (For example, a Pokémon with 324/400 HP uses Substitute: their Substitute has 100 HP, which is 1/4 of 400.) Since the Substitute needs to be killed before the real Pokémon can be hurt, these Pokémon also will use Focus Punch sometimes, a particularly common tactic among Breloom in later games, especially in Single Battles since the opponent's turn is wasted using the move that removes the Substitute.


Transform


Cures: Switching out

Immunizers: None

Details & Effects: Enacted by the move Transform, the Pokémon will become the same as the target. This means they copy stats (except HP) with level-based adjustments (in other words: Level 50 Ditto copies Level 100 Pokémon with 400 Attack, Ditto has 200), stat changes, moves (PP will become 5/5 for all moves, despite any PP UP'ing), and ability; pretty much the only things not copied are HP and item held. This is a bit gimmicky, but can work on Pokémon EV-trained for HP, and it's amazingly common for Blissey to be chosen for Imposter on Pokémon Showdown metagames that allow illegal ability/moveset changes (since Blissey has the highest HP of all, and then can copy awesome stats).


The "Minor" Details - DVs & Stat EXP.



Sectional Flowchart






Introduction to These Values



Most of you who'd probably bother to be looking at an FAQ have absolutely no idea what a DV is, or what the significance of six perfect DVs is, or what your Pokémon's Stat Experience Points are intended to do. (I assume this since most people ready for official competition - and thus already know this stuff - generally don't read FAQs. Sorry if I'm being overly-presumptuous.)

These are the reasons why two Pokémon - even of the same species, and even raised by the exact same person - could end up drastically different. They can be the difference between a Pokémon using a physical- or special-oriented moveset. They can be the difference between going with a speedy Dragonite or a bulky one that abuses Dragon Dance. They can be the reason behind an effective Pokémon that knows Transform. When properly manipulated, many new strategies open up for your Pokémon, for you are more free in manipulating their statistics. With the proper knowledge, you can actually calculate the Pokémon's Level 100 stats before the Pokémon has even been hatched!

And so, you need to learn what these are, how they work, and how to manipulate them to your own advantages. Keep in mind that this section is absolutely by no means intended to be read by people who do not intend to battle against other, real-life people in a competitive setting. You will not need to know any of this stuff to get through the game at all.

Within the following sections, I will discuss what the nature of these stats and what they do, and more exactly how one can manipulate them in their own favor to help them make their Pokémon - for their strategy - completely and utterly flawless.




Stat Experience



If you've ever played Pokémon competitively before, or seen such discussions on forums, you're probably fairly aware of the concept of an Effort Value. Stat Experience - or just Stat EXP. - is much the same, and is in fact the predecessor of Effort Values (EVs). Stat EXP. is indeed like an experience point system for your stats: by defeating Pokémon, you secretly accumulate this Stat EXP. and your stats will in turn grow.

How do your stats grow? Well, with every level-up, your stats are recalculated. A Stat EXP. boost will be applied as needed -- the boost is equal to "sqrt(Stat EXP.) / 4" at Level 100, and proportionate amounts below. Stat EXP. can range from 0 to 65,536, and is applied individually to each stat, so any and all stats can receive a boost of 64 points by Level 100. Unlike EVs, there is no limitation across all your stats: each stat can have the maximum value if desired.

So, how do you gain Stat EXP.? Well, there are two means. The first is the most obvious -- by defeating opposing Pokémon. Each Pokémon, as you may know, has a set of base stats that determine its individual stat growth; well, when you defeat a Pokémon, the Pokémon's base stat values are added to your stat EXP. So say you beat a Pokémon with a 154 base Attack stat - you then get 154 Attack stat EXP.! The alternative method is to use Vitamins, like HP Ups and Proteins -- these boost your stats by 2,560 Stat EXP., but will not do more than 25,600 points of growth.




Dynamic Values (DVs)



Much like how Stat EXP. is the antecedent of Effort Values, DVs are the antecedent of IVs, if you've ever learned about them. If not, don't worry about it.

Each stat has its own unique DV value. Four of these are determined at random: Attack, Defense, Special, and Speed. Their values also range at random from 0 to 15, but are stored in binary, so they range from 0000-1111 in binary. The significance of this is that it is the DVs of these four that determine the HP DV - specifically, the "one's" digit of each binary number in the order named previously will be taken together. So DVs of 0101, 0111, 0000, and 0001 - 5, 7, 0, and 1 respectively - will result in an HP DV of 1101, or 13. But, in practice, they're simply random.

The influence of DVs is pretty basic - you'll earn that a number of points in that stat equal to double the DVs by Level 100. DVs are completely set-in from the time your Pokémon is found, so they cannot be changed.



Misc. Game Mechanics



Sectional Format






Stat Changes In Battle



In case you viewed any version of this guide prior to v1.40+, take note that the "Stat Change Conversions" section which equated stat changes across stats to each other was flawed and pointless. A change of +X in a stat equals -X in the other, always.





Introduction and Basics

Stat changes occur when a move or item affects the actual stat in battle. There are moves known to raise and lower a Pokémon's stats, and they can be quite influential in the outcome battle - imagine if your Pokémon was suddenly dealing double damage! Of course, how would you know they're dealing double the damage from before? The game poorly elaborates on this mechanic, but below, you'll see exactly how stats and their in-battle modifications interact with each other to produce some devastating moves.

Change Attack, Defense, Sp. Atk., Sp. Def., Speed Accuracy, Evasion Crit. Rate Textual Cue
+6 +300% (x4.00 or 4) +200% (x3.00 or 3) - "Maximized" - only from Belly Drum (Atk. +6)
+5 +250% (x3.50 or 7/2) +167% (x2.67 or 8/3) - [No cue - nothing has such a great effect]
+4 +200% (x3.00 or 3) +133% (x2.33 or 7/3) - [No cue - nothing has such a great effect]
+3 +150% (x2.50 or 5/2) +100% (x2.00 or 2) 100% (always) "Drastically raised"
+2 +100% (x2.00 or 2) +67% (x1.67 or 5/3) 50% (1/2) "Sharply raised"
+1 +50% (x1.50 or 3/2) +33% (x1.33 or 4/3) 12.5% (1/8) "Raised"
None No change (±0%, x1.00) No change (±0%, x1.00) 6.25% (1/16) ... Really?
-1 -25% (x0.67 or 2/3) -25% (x0.75 or 3/4) - "Fell"
-2 -33% (x0.50 or 1/2) -40% (x0.60 or 3/5) - "Sharply fell"
-3 -50% (x0.40 or 2/5) -50% (x0.50 or 1/2) - "Harshly fell"
-4 -60% (x0.33 or 1/3) -58.2% (x0.428 or 3/7) - [No cue - nothing has such a great effect]
-5 -67% (x0.284 or 2/7) -62.5% (x0.375 or 3/8) - [No cue - nothing has such a great effect]
-6 -75% (x0.25 or 1/4) -67% (x0.33 or 1/3) - [No cue - nothing has such a great effect]

If you prefer formulas, stat changes are determined like so:

Statistic Attack, Defense, Sp. Atk., Sp. Def., Speed Accuracy, Evasion
Formula for Increases MULTIPLIER = (2 + Stages) / 2 MULTIPLIER = (3 + Stages) / 3
Formula for Decreases MULTIPLIER = 2 / (2 + Stages) MULTIPLIER = 3 / (3 + Stages)



Stat Change Accumulations

Finally, we will discuss one topic that is moreso of interest than actual necessity: what happens when two stat changes are in effect at the same time, but for opposite stats on two Pokémon? Like, for example, your Attack being lowered 1 stage as well as your opponent's Defense? Will the damage necessarily equal out? Will I actually deal more damage!? This section will help to simplify that process. As demonstrated by the previous section, we cannot necessarily assume a "net change" (i.e. -1 Atk. and -1 Def. is equal damage to no changes at all), even though it's not exactly "net". In any case, remember this:

  • Attack changes on you will oppose those of your opponent's Defense, and vice versa
  • The same holds true for Sp. Atk. and Sp. Def., barring a few moves that consider Defense in lieu of Sp. Def. (thus, the first chart applies for both Physical and Special attacks)
  • Accuracy changes on you will oppose those of your opponent's Evasion, and vice versa

OFFENSE/DEFENSE ACCUMALATIONS
Attack/Sp. Atk. Change Defense/Sp. Def. Change Change in Damage
Stages Multiplier Stages Multiplier
-D +6 -D x4.00 +6 x4.00 x1.0000
+5 x3.50 x1.1429
+4 x3.00 x1.3333
+3 x2.50 x1.6000
+2 x2.00 x2.0000
+1 x1.50 x2.6667
+/-0 x1.00 x4.0000
-1 x0.67 x6.0000
-2 x0.50 x8.0000
-3 x0.40 x10.0000
-4 x0.33 x12.0000
-5 x0.286 x14.0000
-6 x0.25 x16.0000
-D +5 -D x3.50 +6 x4.00 x0.8750
+5 x3.50 x1.0000
+4 x3.00 x1.1667
+3 x2.50 x1.4000
+2 x2.00 x1.7500
+1 x1.50 x2.3333
+/-0 x1.00 x3.5000
-1 x0.67 x5.2500
-2 x0.50 x7.0000
-3 x0.40 x8.7500
-4 x0.33 x10.5000
-5 x0.286 x12.2500
-6 x0.25 x14.0000
-D +4 -D x3.00 +6 x4.00 x0.7500
+5 x3.50 x0.8571
+4 x3.00 x1.0000
+3 x2.50 x1.2000
+2 x2.00 x1.5000
+1 x1.50 x2.0000
+/-0 x1.00 x3.0000
-1 x0.67 x4.5000
-2 x0.50 x6.0000
-3 x0.40 x7.5000
-4 x0.33 x9.0000
-5 x0.286 x10.5000
-6 x0.25 x12.0000
-D +3 -D x2.50 +6 x4.00 x0.6250
+5 x3.50 x0.7143
+4 x3.00 x0.8333
+3 x2.50 x1.0000
+2 x2.00 x1.2500
+1 x1.50 x1.6667
+/-0 x1.00 x2.5000
-1 x0.67 x3.7500
-2 x0.50 x5.0000
-3 x0.40 x6.2500
-4 x0.33 x7.5000
-5 x0.286 x8.7500
-6 x0.25 x10.0000
-D +2 -D x2.00 +6 x4.00 x0.5000
+5 x3.50 x0.5714
+4 x3.00 x0.6667
+3 x2.50 x0.8000
+2 x2.00 x1.0000
+1 x1.50 x1.3333
+/-0 x1.00 x2.0000
-1 x0.67 x3.0000
-2 x0.50 x4.0000
-3 x0.40 x5.0000
-4 x0.33 x6.0000
-5 x0.286 x7.0000
-6 x0.25 x8.0000
-D +1 -D x1.50 +6 x4.00 x0.3750
+5 x3.50 x0.4286
+4 x3.00 x0.5000
+3 x2.50 x0.6000
+2 x2.00 x0.7500
+1 x1.50 x1.0000
+/-0 x1.00 x1.5000
-1 x0.67 x2.2500
-2 x0.50 x3.0000
-3 x0.40 x3.7500
-4 x0.33 x4.5000
-5 x0.286 x5.2500
-6 x0.25 x6.0000
-D +/-0 -D x1.00 +6 x4.00 x0.2500
+5 x3.50 x0.2857
+4 x3.00 x0.3333
+3 x2.50 x0.4000
+2 x2.00 x0.5000
+1 x1.50 x0.6667
+/-0 x1.00 x1.0000
-1 x0.67 x1.5000
-2 x0.50 x2.0000
-3 x0.40 x2.5000
-4 x0.33 x3.0000
-5 x0.286 x3.5000
-6 x0.25 x4.0000
-D -1 -D x0.67 +6 x4.00 x0.1667
+5 x3.50 x0.1905
+4 x3.00 x0.2222
+3 x2.50 x0.2667
+2 x2.00 x0.3333
+1 x1.50 x0.4444
+/-0 x1.00 x0.6667
-1 x0.67 x1.0000
-2 x0.50 x1.3333
-3 x0.40 x1.6667
-4 x0.33 x2.0000
-5 x0.286 x2.3333
-6 x0.25 x2.6667
-D -2 -D x0.50 +6 x4.00 x0.1250
+5 x3.50 x0.1429
+4 x3.00 x0.1667
+3 x2.50 x0.2000
+2 x2.00 x0.2500
+1 x1.50 x0.3333
+/-0 x1.00 x0.5000
-1 x0.67 x0.7500
-2 x0.50 x1.0000
-3 x0.40 x1.2500
-4 x0.33 x1.5000
-5 x0.286 x1.7500
-6 x0.25 x2.0000
-D -3 -D x0.40 +6 x4.00 x0.1000
+5 x3.50 x0.1143
+4 x3.00 x0.1333
+3 x2.50 x0.1600
+2 x2.00 x0.2000
+1 x1.50 x0.2667
+/-0 x1.00 x0.4000
-1 x0.67 x0.6000
-2 x0.50 x0.8000
-3 x0.40 x1.0000
-4 x0.33 x1.2000
-5 x0.286 x1.4000
-6 x0.25 x1.6000
-D -4 -D x0.33 +6 x4.00 x0.0833
+5 x3.50 x0.0952
+4 x3.00 x0.1111
+3 x2.50 x0.1333
+2 x2.00 x0.1667
+1 x1.50 x0.2222
+/-0 x1.00 x0.3333
-1 x0.67 x0.5000
-2 x0.50 x0.6667
-3 x0.40 x0.8333
-4 x0.33 x1.0000
-5 x0.286 x1.1667
-6 x0.25 x1.3333
-D -5 -D x0.286 +6 x4.00 x0.0714
+5 x3.50 x0.0816
+4 x3.00 x0.0952
+3 x2.50 x0.1143
+2 x2.00 x0.1429
+1 x1.50 x0.1905
+/-0 x1.00 x0.2857
-1 x0.67 x0.4286
-2 x0.50 x0.5714
-3 x0.40 x0.7143
-4 x0.33 x0.8571
-5 x0.286 x1.0000
-6 x0.25 x1.1429
-D -6 -D x0.25 +6 x4.00 x0.0625
+5 x3.50 x0.0714
+4 x3.00 x0.0833
+3 x2.50 x0.1000
+2 x2.00 x0.1250
+1 x1.50 x0.1667
+/-0 x1.00 x0.2500
-1 x0.67 x0.3750
-2 x0.50 x0.5000
-3 x0.40 x0.6250
-4 x0.33 x0.7500
-5 x0.286 x0.8750
-6 x0.25 x1.0000


ACCURACY/EVASION ACCUMALATIONS
Accuracy Change Evasion Change Change in Hit Rate
Stages Multiplier Stages Multiplier
-D +6 -D x3.00 +6 x3.00 x1.0000
+5 x2.67 x1.1250
+4 x2.33 x1.2857
+3 x2.00 x1.5000
+2 x1.67 x1.8000
+1 x1.33 x2.2500
±0 x1.00 x3.0000
-1 x0.75 x4.0000
-2 x0.60 x5.0000
-3 x0.50 x6.0000
-4 x0.428 x7.0000
-5 x0.375 x8.0000
-6 x0.33 x9.0000
-D +5 -D x2.67 +6 x3.00 x0.8889
+5 x2.67 x1.0000
+4 x2.33 x1.1429
+3 x2.00 x1.3333
+2 x1.67 x1.6000
+1 x1.33 x2.0000
±0 x1.00 x2.6667
-1 x0.75 x3.5556
-2 x0.60 x4.4444
-3 x0.50 x5.3333
-4 x0.428 x6.2222
-5 x0.375 x7.1111
-6 x0.33 x8.0000
-D +4 -D x2.33 +6 x3.00 x0.7778
+5 x2.67 x0.8750
+4 x2.33 x1.0000
+3 x2.00 x1.1667
+2 x1.67 x1.4000
+1 x1.33 x1.7500
±0 x1.00 x2.3333
-1 x0.75 x3.1111
-2 x0.60 x3.8889
-3 x0.50 x4.6667
-4 x0.428 x5.4444
-5 x0.375 x6.2222
-6 x0.33 x7.00
-D +3 -D x2.00 +6 x3.00 x0.6667
+5 x2.67 x0.7500
+4 x2.33 x0.8571
+3 x2.00 x1.0000
+2 x1.67 x1.2000
+1 x1.33 x1.5000
±0 x1.00 x2.0000
-1 x0.75 x2.6667
-2 x0.60 x3.3333
-3 x0.50 x4.0000
-4 x0.428 x4.6667
-5 x0.375 x5.3333
-6 x0.33 x6.00
-D +2 -D x1.67 +6 x3.00 x0.5556
+5 x2.67 x0.6250
+4 x2.33 x0.7143
+3 x2.00 x0.8333
+2 x1.67 x1.0000
+1 x1.33 x1.2500
±0 x1.00 x1.6667
-1 x0.75 x2.2222
-2 x0.60 x2.7778
-3 x0.50 x3.3333
-4 x0.428 x3.8889
-5 x0.375 x4.4444
-6 x0.33 x5.0000
-D +1 -D x1.33 +6 x3.00 x0.4444
+5 x2.67 x0.5000
+4 x2.33 x0.5714
+3 x2.00 x0.6667
+2 x1.67 x0.8000
+1 x1.33 x1.0000
±0 x1.00 x1.3333
-1 x0.75 x1.7778
-2 x0.60 x2.2222
-3 x0.50 x2.6667
-4 x0.428 x3.1111
-5 x0.375 x3.5556
-6 x0.33 x4.0000
-D ±0 -D x1.00 +6 x3.00 x0.3333
+5 x2.67 x0.3750
+4 x2.33 x0.4286
+3 x2.00 x0.5000
+2 x1.67 x0.6000
+1 x1.33 x0.7500
±0 x1.00 x1.0000
-1 x0.75 x1.3333
-2 x0.60 x1.6667
-3 x0.50 x2.0000
-4 x0.428 x2.3333
-5 x0.375 x2.6667
-6 x0.33 x3.0000
-D -1 -D x0.75 +6 x3.00 x0.2500
+5 x2.67 x0.2813
+4 x2.33 x0.3214
+3 x2.00 x0.3750
+2 x1.67 x0.4500
+1 x1.33 x0.5630
±0 x1.00 x0.7500
-1 x0.75 x1.0000
-2 x0.60 x1.2500
-3 x0.50 x1.5000
-4 x0.428 x1.7500
-5 x0.375 x2.0000
-6 x0.33 x2.2500
-D -2 -D x0.60 +6 x3.00 x0.2000
+5 x2.67 x0.2250
+4 x2.33 x0.2571
+3 x2.00 x0.3000
+2 x1.67 x0.3636
+1 x1.33 x0.4545
±0 x1.00 x0.6000
-1 x0.75 x0.8000
-2 x0.60 x1.0000
-3 x0.50 x1.2000
-4 x0.428 x1.4000
-5 x0.375 x1.6000
-6 x0.33 x1.8000
-D -3 -D x0.50 +6 x3.00 x0.1667
+5 x2.67 x0.1875
+4 x2.33 x0.2143
+3 x2.00 x0.2500
+2 x1.67 x0.3000
+1 x1.33 x0.3750
±0 x1.00 x0.5000
-1 x0.75 x0.6667
-2 x0.60 x0.8333
-3 x0.50 x1.0000
-4 x0.428 x1.1667
-5 x0.375 x1.3333
-6 x0.33 x1.5000
-D -4 -D x0.428 +6 x3.00 x0.1429
+5 x2.67 x0.1607
+4 x2.33 x0.1837
+3 x2.00 x0.2413
+2 x1.67 x0.2571
+1 x1.33 x0.3214
±0 x1.00 x0.4286
-1 x0.75 x0.5714
-2 x0.60 x0.7143
-3 x0.50 x0.8571
-4 x0.428 x1.0000
-5 x0.375 x1.1429
-6 x0.33 x1.2857
-D -5 -D x0.375 +6 x3.00 x0.125
+5 x2.67 x0.1406
+4 x2.33 x0.1607
+3 x2.00 x0.1875
+2 x1.67 x0.2250
+1 x1.33 x0.28125
±0 x1.00 x0.3750
-1 x0.75 x0.5000
-2 x0.60 x0.6250
-3 x0.50 x0.7500
-4 x0.428 x0.8750
-5 x0.375 x1.0000
-6 x0.33 x1.1250
-D -6 -D x0.33 +6 x3.00 x0.1111
+5 x2.67 x0.1250
+4 x2.33 x0.1429
+3 x2.00 x0.1667
+2 x1.67 x0.2000
+1 x1.33 x0.2500
±0 x1.00 x0.3333
-1 x0.75 x0.4444
-2 x0.60 x0.5556
-3 x0.50 x0.6667
-4 x0.428 x0.7778
-5 x0.375 x0.8889
-6 x0.33 x1.0000



Move Priority



A great concept in Pokémon to keep in mind is the notion of "priority" moves. There are a certain set of moves that will have a priority that will differ from most moves, allowing them to go first or last or the like. For example, Quick Attack is said to go first, right?

Let's say you use it. And then I use Protect. But my Protect goes first somehow (even assuming you're faster than me). What gives?

See, what the game doesn't mention is that these "goes first"/"goes last" moves will have different priorities. Some moves will go before others, and others later than others, and that is simply how it works - no matter your Speed stat, if you don't use a higher-priority move, a +1 priority move like Quick Attack, even used by the slowest Pokémon ever, will go first.

The purpose of this section is to simply list the priority of moves and such. So, here we go...

Oh, a few more things.


  • Priority +6: Attempts to flee battle
  • Priority +5: Use of items by trainers
  • Priority +4: Pokémon switching out (not forced by moves/items); the charging up of Focus Punch (not its execution)
  • Priority +3: Protect
  • Priority +2: Extreme Speed, Feint
  • Priority +1: Bullet Punch, Ice Shard, Mach Punch, Quick Attack
  • Priority ±0: Most moves
  • Priority -1: (none)
  • Priority -2: Counter, Mirror Coat
  • Priority -3: Roar, Whirlwind



Damage Calculation



The calculation for damage in battle is interestingly complex. While you can obviously assume that higher Attacks or lower Defenses equal more damage to the target, it can still be interesting to look at the actual formula and be able to precisely know the damage dealt by a move in battle. Damage will be calculated according to this formula:

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 DAMAGE = {{[(2 * ULv. / 5) + 2] * UATK * UBP / TDEF / 50} + 2} * STAB * EFF * (RND / 100) * BMOD
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   ULv. = User's Level

   UATK = User's Attack or Special Attack (which is used is move-dependent)

    UBP = The base power of the user's move

   TDEF = The target's Defense or Special Defense (which is used is move-dependent)

   STAB = 1.00 if the move's type and the user's do not match
          1.50 if the move's type and the user's do match

    EFF = 0.00 if the move is not effective at all (i.e. Fighting on Ghost)
          0.25 if the move is double-resisted (i.e. Water on a Grass/Dragon)
          0.50 if the move is single-resisted (i.e. Water on a Dragon)
          1.00 if the move is normally effective (i.e. Water on a Normal)
          2.00 if the move is singly-super-effective (i.e. Water on Fire)
          4.00 if the move is doubly-super-effective (i.e. Water on Fire/Ground)

    RND = Random number from 85 to 100

   BMOD = If you have the badge boosting your attacking stat, this is 1.125, and 1 otherwise.
In Link Battles, this is always 1.

You simply need to substitute the right variables into the formula to get the answer for the exact damage you can do. As you can see, the user's own level is considered in addition to their Attack or Special - which is used depends on the move's class, Physical or Special, respectively. Similarly, the target's Defense or Special are used for Physical and Special moves respectively. A few exceptions exist, but they specifically say whether they deal physical or special damage: the named class determines the Attack used, and the type of damage dealt determines the Defense used. 

You can also derive the fact that your move has a damage range based on the random-number variable. The move, on average, will usually favor the numbers 92 or 93 for the RND variable, causing a range of 85% to 100% of the move's full power and a room of error of ±7.5% from 92.5%. In another way, it demonstrates a near-linear correlation among the stats when you calculate them: that doubling Defense halves damage, or doubling Attack doubles damage, or that the Base Powers of moves, when using the same Attack/Defense, make equal damage. That latter fact is itself very concerning when it comes to the use of mixed-attackers, those that use both Special and Physical moves, and it thus helps to equalize their Attack and Sp. Atk. to be able to accurately use what you deign to be the best move for the situation.




EXP. Earning Mechanics



Throughout the course of the game, it is expected that you will fight many Pokémon. It is customary for games of the RPG genre to include some kind of leveling up system; by doing so, the developers can help to provide greater challenge later in the game while also providing you the means by which to equal or surpass your foes. As usual, the level-up system is centered around the earning of EXP. (experience points); as Pokémon earn more EXP., they will eventually level-up.

Most RPGs take a relatively simplistic approach to this; even Pokémon did for a while. Essentially, in the olden days, enemies would give out flat amounts of EXP. representative of their species, and Pokémon did little more to fix that than adding a relevance to Level into the formula. The formula has since changed (back in Black/White) so that the formula also considers the victorious Pokémon's own Level, thereby making higher-leveled Pokémon earn less EXP. from battles so as to counteract the possibility of overleveling simply as a result of completionism. Of course, that seems to have been removed as early as Pokémon X/Y (2013), though the evidence is not concrete as of yet.

Throughout the course of this section, we will first discuss the mechanics of the "EXP. groups" before the actual mechanics of earning EXP. and the calculation thereof. Okay so far? Here's a full flowchart for the section:


  • EXP. Groups - An explanation of the grouping of Pokémon by EXP. earned, and the associated formulas
  • EXP. Growth Chart - A visualization of the growth formulas
  • EXP. Earning - An explanation of the earning of EXP., and the formulas and mechanics concerning it




EXP. Groups

Every Pokémon will first fit into one of six "groups" for EXP. earning. This will end up determining their growth formula as well. Note that Erratic and Fluctuating are not in Generation I, but they're here for completionism.

  • Erratic: This is the fastest leveling group, hitting 600,000 by Level 100. Also called "Very Fast", and originally named Erractic due to its changing EXP. formula: it changes four times between Levels 1 and 100.
  • Fast: This group hits 800,000 by Level 100.
  • Medium-Fast: This group hits 1,000,000 by Level 100.
  • Medium-Slow: This group hits 1,059,680 by Level 100.
  • Slow: This group hits 1,250,000 by Level 100.
  • Fluctuating: Another variable group in terms of the formula (three total formulae), it will hit 1,640,000 EXP. at Level 100.

Here are the formulas attributed to each of the groups. These are "total EXP." formulas for the given levels ("n"). If you would prefer a visual version of these, a chart will follow the list.

Experience Group Level Range Formula for Named Level Range
Erratic/Very Fast Levels 1-50 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * (100 - n) / 50
Levels 51-68 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * (150 - n) / 100
Levels 69-98 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * [1911 - (10 * n)] / 1500
Levels 99-100 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * (160 - n) / 100
Fast Levels 1-100 (all) TOTAL EXP = 0.8 * n^3
Medium-Fast Levels 1-100 (all) TOTAL EXP = n^3
Medium-Slow Levels 1-100 (all) TOTAL EXP = (1.2 * n^3) - (15 * n^2) + (100 * n) - 140
Slow Levels 1-100 (all) TOTAL EXP = 1.25 * n^3
Fluctuating/Very Slow Levels 1-15 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * [(n + 73) / 150]
Levels 16-36 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * [(n + 14) / 50]
Levels 37-100 TOTAL EXP = n^3 * {[(0.5 * n) + 32] / 50}




EXP. Growth Chart

I wonder if you've noticed the EXP. total for the Medium-Slow Growth at Level 1. Yes, at Level 1, Medium-Fast Pokémon are supposed to have -54 EXP.; this is a flaw in the formula, calculate it yourself if you don't believe me. This is because the second curve (point of inflection) in the cubic equation is accidentally below the x-axis: this puts n=1 at -54. Game Freak patched over this in later releases of Pokémon.

However, that interestingly led to a glitch in the original Pokémon games. Admittedly, it wasn't much of a concern then: until the release of Diamond/Pearl in 2007 (which patched this glitch), it was impossible to get Level 1 Pokémon. In Pokémon Red, Blue, Green, and Yellow, however, you can utilize variants of the Mew Glitch or Old Man Glitch (look it up) so that you end up with Level 0 or Level 1 Pokémon. Since the glitch wasn't patched then, for whatever reason earning enough EXP. at Level 1 to level-up would cause the Pokémon to grow straight to Level 100. This is because the negative number was interpreted as negative, but games often don't store negatives unless their bytes are signed (which they're not in this instance), and thus felt to be a large positive number, which was in turn considered be the large amount of EXP. needed to hit Level 100 once the level-up was triggered. ... I think. Anyhow. Trivia.


LEVEL FLUCTUATING GROWTH SLOW GROWTH MEDIUM-SLOW GROWTH MEDIUM-FAST GROWTH FAST GROWTH ERRATIC GROWTH
EXP. Total Next Lv. EXP. Total Next Lv. EXP. Total Next Lv. EXP. Total Next Lv. EXP. Total Next Lv. EXP. Total Next Lv.
Lv. 1 0 +16 0 +6 1 +7 -54 / 0 +64 / +10 0 +10 0 +4
Lv. 2 16 +37 6 +15 8 +19 10 +48 10 +24 4 +10
Lv. 3 52 +71 22 +30 27 +37 57 +39 34 +46 14 +19
Lv. 4 123 +115 51 +49 64 +61 97 +38 80 +76 33 +32
Lv. 5 238 +169 100 +73 125 +91 135 +44 156 +114 65 +49
Lv. 6 406 +232 173 +102 216 +127 179 +57 270 +159 114 +69
Lv. 7 638 +304 274 +135 343 +169 237 +78 429 +211 183 +94
Lv. 8 942 +385 410 +174 512 +217 314 +105 640 +271 276 +122
Lv. 9 1,327 +473 583 +217 729 +271 420 +140 911 +339 399 +155
Lv. 10 1,800 +569 800 +265 1,000 +331 560 +182 1,250 +414 553 +192
Lv. 11 2,369 +672 1,065 +318 1,331 +397 742 +231 1,664 +496 745 +234
Lv. 12 3,041 +782 1,382 +375 1,728 +469 974 +288 2,160 +586 979 +280
Lv. 13 3,823 +897 1,758 +438 2,197 +547 1,261 +351 2,746 +684 1,260 +332
Lv. 14 4,720 +1,018 2,195 +505 2,744 +631 1,613 +422 3,430 +789 1,592 +388
Lv. 15 5,738 +1,144 2,700 +577 3,375 +721 2,035 +500 4,219 +901 1,980 +478
Lv. 16 6,881 +1,274 3,277 +654 4,096 +817 2,535 +585 5,120 +1,021 2,458 +588
Lv. 17 8,156 +1,409 3,930 +735 4,913 +919 3,121 +678 6,141 +1,149 3,046 +686
Lv. 18 9,564 +1,547 4,666 +822 5,832 +1,027 3,798 +777 7,290 +1,284 3,732 +794
Lv. 19 11,112 +1,688 5,487 +913 6,859 +1,141 4,576 +884 8,574 +1,426 4,527 +913
Lv. 20 12,800 +1,832 6,400 +1,009 8,000 +1,261 5,460 +998 10,000 +1,576 5,440 +1,043
Lv. 21 14,632 +1,979 7,409 +1,110 9,261 +1,387 6,458 +1,119 11,576 +1,734 6,483 +1,184
Lv. 22 16,611 +2,126 8,518 +1,215 10,648 +1,519 7,578 +1,248 13,310 +1,899 7,667 +1,337
Lv. 23 18,737 +2,275 9,734 +1,326 12,167 +1,657 8,825 +1,383 15,209 +2,071 9,004 +1,503
Lv. 24 21,012 +2,425 11,059 +1,441 13,824 +1,801 10,209 +1,526 17,280 +2,251 10,506 +1,681
Lv. 25 23,438 +2,575 12,500 +1,561 15,625 +1,951 11,735 +1,676 19,531 +2,439 12,188 +1,873
Lv. 26 26,012 +2,725 14,061 +1,686 17,576 +2,107 13,411 +1,833 21,970 +2,634 14,061 +2,079
Lv. 27 28,737 +2,874 15,746 +1,815 19,683 +2,269 15,245 +1,998 24,604 +2,836 16,140 +2,300
Lv. 28 31,611 +3,022 17,562 +1,950 21,952 +2,437 17,242 +2,169 27,440 +3,046 18,440 +2,535
Lv. 29 34,632 +3,168 19,511 +2,089 24,389 +2,611 19,412 +2,348 30,486 +3,264 20,975 +2,785
Lv. 30 37,800 +3,312 21,600 +2,233 27,000 +2,791 21,760 +2,534 33,750 +3,489 23,760 +3,052
Lv. 31 41,112 +3,453 23,833 +2,382 29,791 +2,977 24,294 +2,727 37,239 +3,721 26,812 +3,335
Lv. 32 44,564 +3,591 26,214 +2,535 32,768 +3,169 27,022 +2,928 40,960 +3,961 30,147 +3,634
Lv. 33 48,156 +3,726 28,750 +2,694 35,937 +3,367 29,949 +3,135 44,921 +4,209 33,781 +3,951
Lv. 34 51,881 +3,856 31,443 +2,857 39,304 +3,571 33,085 +3,350 49,130 +4,464 37,732 +4,286
Lv. 35 55,738 +3,982 34,300 +3,025 42,875 +3,781 36,435 +3,572 53,594 +4,726 42,018 +4,639
Lv. 36 59,720 +4,103 37,325 +3,198 46,656 +3,997 40,007 +3,801 58,320 +4,996 46,656 +4,504
Lv. 37 63,823 +4,219 40,522 +3,375 50,653 +4,219 43,809 +4,038 63,316 +5,274 51,160 +4,810
Lv. 38 68,041 +4,328 43,898 +3,558 54,872 +4,447 47,846 +4,281 68,590 +5,559 55,969 +5,129
Lv. 39 72,369 +4,431 47,455 +3,745 59,319 +4,681 52,128 +4,532 74,149 +5,851 61,099 +5,461
Lv. 40 76,800 +4,527 51,200 +3,937 64,000 +4,921 56,660 +4,790 80,000 +6,151 66,560 +5,807
Lv. 41 81,327 +4,615 55,137 +4,134 68,921 +5,167 61,450 +5,055 86,151 +6,459 72,367 +6,166
Lv. 42 85,942 +4,696 59,270 +4,335 74,088 +5,419 66,506 +5,328 92,610 +6,774 78,533 +6,539
Lv. 43 90,638 +4,768 63,606 +4,542 79,507 +5,677 71,833 +5,607 99,384 +7,096 85,072 +6,926
Lv. 44 95,406 +4,831 68,147 +4,753 85,184 +5,941 77,441 +5,894 106,480 +7,426 91,999 +7,328
Lv. 45 100,238 +4,885 72,900 +4,969 91,125 +6,211 83,335 +6,188 113,906 +7,764 99,326 +7,743
Lv. 46 105,123 +4,930 77,869 +5,190 97,336 +6,487 89,523 +6,489 121,670 +8,109 107,070 +8,174
Lv. 47 110,052 +4,963 83,058 +5,415 103,823 +6,769 96,013 +6,798 129,779 +8,461 115,244 +8,620
Lv. 48 115,016 +4,986 88,474 +5,646 110,592 +7,057 102,810 +7,113 138,240 +8,821 123,863 +9,080
Lv. 49 120,002 +4,998 94,119 +5,881 117,649 +7,351 109,924 +7,436 147,061 +9,189 132,943 +9,557
Lv. 50 125,000 +6,324 100,000 +6,121 125,000 +7,651 117,360 +7,766 156,250 +9,564 142,500 +10,049
Lv. 51 131,324 +6,471 106,121 +6,366 132,651 +7,957 125,126 +8,103 165,814 +9,946 152,549 +10,557
Lv. 52 137,796 +6,615 112,486 +6,615 140,608 +8,269 133,230 +8,448 175,760 +10,336 163,105 +11,081
Lv. 53 144,411 +6,755 119,102 +6,870 148,877 +8,587 141,677 +8,799 186,096 +10,734 174,186 +11,621
Lv. 54 151,165 +6,891 125,971 +7,129 157,464 +8,911 150,477 +9,158 196,830 +11,139 185,808 +12,179
Lv. 55 158,056 +7,023 133,100 +7,393 166,375 +9,241 159,635 +9,524 207,969 +11,551 197,986 +12,753
Lv. 56 165,079 +7,150 140,493 +7,662 175,616 +9,577 169,159 +9,897 219,520 +11,971 210,739 +13,344
Lv. 57 172,229 +7,274 148,154 +7,935 185,193 +9,919 179,057 +10,278 231,491 +12,399 224,084 +13,953
Lv. 58 179,503 +7,392 156,090 +8,214 195,112 +10,267 189,334 +10,665 243,890 +12,834 238,037 +14,580
Lv. 59 186,895 +7,505 164,303 +8,497 205,379 +10,621 200,000 +11,060 256,724 +13,276 252,616 +15,224
Lv. 60 194,400 +7,613 172,800 +8,785 216,000 +10,981 211,060 +11,462 270,000 +13,726 267,840 +15,886
Lv. 61 202,013 +7,716 181,585 +9,078 226,981 +11,347 222,522 +11,871 283,726 +14,184 283,726 +16,567
Lv. 62 209,729 +7,812 190,662 +9,375 238,328 +11,719 234,394 +12,288 297,910 +14,649 300,293 +17,266
Lv. 63 217,541 +7,903 200,038 +9,678 250,047 +12,097 246,681 +12,711 312,559 +15,121 317,560 +17,985
Lv. 64 225,444 +7,987 209,715 +9,985 262,144 +12,481 259,393 +13,142 327,680 +15,601 335,544 +18,722
Lv. 65 233,431 +8,065 219,700 +10,297 274,625 +12,871 272,535 +13,580 343,281 +16,089 354,266 +19,479
Lv. 66 241,497 +8,137 229,997 +10,614 287,496 +13,267 286,115 +14,025 359,370 +16,584 373,745 +20,255
Lv. 67 249,633 +8,201 240,610 +10,935 300,763 +13,669 300,141 +14,478 375,954 +17,086 394,000 +21,051
Lv. 68 257,834 +9,572 251,546 +11,262 314,432 +14,077 314,618 +14,937 393,040 +17,596 415,050 +21,867
Lv. 69 267,406 +9,509 262,807 +11,593 328,509 +14,491 329,556 +15,404 410,636 +18,114 436,917 +22,703
Lv. 70 276,915 +9,652 274,400 +11,929 343,000 +14,911 344,960 +15,878 428,750 +18,639 459,620 +23,560
Lv. 71 286,567 +9,792 286,329 +12,270 357,911 +15,337 360,838 +16,359 447,389 +19,171 483,180 +24,437
Lv. 72 296,359 +9,927 298,598 +12,615 373,248 +15,769 377,198 +16,848 466,560 +19,711 507,617 +25,336
Lv. 73 306,286 +10,059 311,214 +12,966 389,017 +16,207 394,045 +17,343 486,271 +20,259 532,953 +26,256
Lv. 74 316,345 +10,186 324,179 +13,321 405,224 +16,651 411,389 +17,846 506,530 +20,814 559,209 +27,197
Lv. 75 326,531 +10,310 337,500 +13,681 421,875 +17,101 429,235 +18,356 527,344 +21,376 586,406 +28,160
Lv. 76 336,841 +10,429 351,181 +14,046 438,976 +17,557 447,591 +18,873 548,720 +21,946 614,566 +29,145
Lv. 77 347,269 +10,543 365,226 +14,415 456,533 +18,019 466,465 +19,398 570,666 +22,524 643,712 +30,152
Lv. 78 357,812 +10,652 379,642 +14,790 474,552 +18,487 485,862 +19,929 593,190 +23,109 673,864 +31,182
Lv. 79 368,464 +10,757 394,431 +15,169 493,039 +18,961 505,792 +20,468 616,299 +23,701 705,046 +32,234
Lv. 80 379,221 +10,856 409,600 +15,553 512,000 +19,441 526,260 +21,014 640,000 +24,301 737,280 +33,309
Lv. 81 390,078 +10,951 425,153 +15,942 531,441 +19,927 547,274 +21,567 664,301 +24,909 770,589 +34,408
Lv. 82 401,028 +11,040 441,094 +16,335 551,368 +20,419 568,842 +22,128 689,210 +25,524 804,997 +35,530
Lv. 83 412,068 +11,123 457,430 +16,734 571,787 +20,917 590,969 +22,695 714,734 +26,146 840,527 +36,675
Lv. 84 423,191 +11,200 474,163 +17,137 592,704 +21,421 613,665 +23,270 740,880 +26,776 877,202 +37,844
Lv. 85 434,391 +11,272 491,300 +17,545 614,125 +21,931 636,935 +23,852 767,656 +27,414 915,046 +39,038
Lv. 86 445,663 +11,338 508,845 +17,958 636,056 +22,447 660,787 +24,441 795,070 +28,059 954,084 +40,256
Lv. 87 457,001 +11,397 526,802 +18,375 658,503 +22,969 685,229 +25,038 823,129 +28,711 994,340 +41,498
Lv. 88 468,398 +11,450 545,178 +18,798 681,472 +23,497 710,266 +25,641 851,840 +29,371 1,035,837 +42,765
Lv. 89 479,849 +11,497 563,975 +19,225 704,969 +24,031 735,908 +26,252 881,211 +30,039 1,078,603 +44,057
Lv. 90 491,346 +11,537 583,200 +19,657 729,000 +24,571 762,160 +26,870 911,250 +30,714 1,122,660 +45,375
Lv. 91 502,883 +11,570 602,857 +20,094 753,571 +25,117 789,030 +27,495 941,964 +31,396 1,168,035 +46,718
Lv. 92 514,453 +11,596 622,950 +20,535 778,688 +25,669 816,526 +28,128 973,360 +32,086 1,214,753 +48,087
Lv. 93 526,049 +11,615 643,486 +20,982 804,357 +26,227 844,653 +28,767 1,005,446 +32,784 1,262,840 +49,482
Lv. 94 537,665 +11,627 664,467 +21,433 830,584 +26,791 873,421 +29,414 1,038,230 +33,489 1,312,323 +50,904
Lv. 95 549,292 +11,631 685,900 +21,889 857,375 +27,361 902,835 +30,068 1,071,719 +34,201 1,363,226 +52,351
Lv. 96 560,923 +11,628 707,789 +22,350 884,736 +27,937 932,903 +30,729 1,105,920 +34,921 1,415,578 +53,826
Lv. 97 572,550 +11,616 730,138 +22,815 912,673 +28,519 963,633 +31,398 1,140,841 +35,649 1,469,404 +55,328
Lv. 98 584,167 +7,716 752,954 +23,286 941,192 +29,107 995,030 +32,073 1,176,490 +36,384 1,524,731 +56,856
Lv. 99 591,882 +8,118 776,239 +23,761 970,299 +29,701 1,027,104 +32,756 1,212,874 +37,126 1,581,587 +58,413
Lv. 100 600,000 - 800,000 - 1,000,000 - 1,059,860 - 1,250,000 - 1,640,000 -




EXP. Earning

The process itself of earning EXP. is a relatively simple one: beat Pokémon, gain EXP., nothing complex about that. Of course, we're looking at the game from a mechanical aspect in these sections, right, so that "no pain no gain" concept won't cover it sufficiently. Unlike with Black/White in 2011, the EXP. formula seems to only consider the losing Pokémon's Level, like with the games prior to Pokémon Black/White.

Here's everything affecting EXP. earnings:


  • EXP. Share: Divides the EXP. among all Pokémon in the party if turned on: the participating Pokémon get the normal EXP. value whereas the rest get 50%.
  • Lucky Egg: Holding a Lucky Egg gives the holder 50% extra EXP.
  • Species: All Pokémon have a basal value used in the EXP. gain formula corresponding to their species. You can see (most) of the values in the [[Pokémon Stats (Misc. #2)]] section, with the values being organized in numerical order in the [[Pokémon by EXP. Base Value]] section.
  • Level: Again, both the winning and losing Pokémon's levels are considered.
  • Trainer/Wild Pokémon?: Fighting Trainer-owned Pokémon is an automatic 50% gain.
  • OT/Original Trainer: If you are not the Pokémon's original owner (i.e. it was traded), it gets 50% more EXP. if it was from the same country as you, and 70% if not. For example, I'm in the U.S. My American Pikachu could earn 1,000 EXP., someone else's American Pikachu would earn 1,500 EXP. from me, and a Japanese Pikachu would earn 1,700 EXP.
  • Pokémon-Amie Affection: Having 2 Hearts or more in Pokémon-Amie gives the Pokémon 20% extra EXP.
  • EXP. O-Power: The EXP. O-Power can give party-wide 20%, 50%, or 100% EXP. boosts.
  • Can It Evolve?: Excluding Mega-Evolutions, if the Pokémon is above the level at which it evolves, it gets 20% extra EXP. For example, Charmeleon evolves into Charizard at Level 36. If I would earn 1,000 EXP. with a Level 20 Charmeleon, I would earn 1,200 EXP. at Level 40 (assuming everything was adjusted so that I'd earn 1,000 EXP. at Level 40 still).

If you're curious, the maximum boost would be as follows: an international Pokémon holding a Lucky Egg, having 2+ Hearts in Pokémon-Amie, with EXP. O-Power Lv. 3 active, and the Pokémon being able to evolve, while all fighting a Trainer Pokémon. That results in a EXP. gain 11.016 times the norm: where you'd earn 1,000 EXP. otherwise, you would now earn 11,016 EXP. The highest EXP. earning would be you fighting a Blissey at Level 100 with a Level 1 Pokémon and winning under these circumstances: that would be an EXP. gain of 457,970 EXP.

This is how it would be in the form of a formula:


   ---------------------------------------------------------------------
   EXP. GAIN = BASE * LV * WT * OT * EVO / 7 / SHARE
   ---------------------------------------------------------------------
        BASE = Species-dependent value
 
          LV = The losing Pokémon's level

          WT = 1.0 (norm) if the defeated Pokémon is wild
             = 1.5 (+50%) if the defeated Pokémon is Trainer-owned 

          OT = 1.0 (norm) if the Pokémon is yours
             = 1.5 (+50%) if the Pokémon is not yours, but from the same country
             = 1.7 (+70%) if the Pokémon is not yours and from another country

         EVO = 1.0 (norm) if the Pokémon cannot evolve at its current level
             = 1.2 (+20%) if the Pokémon can evolve at its current level

       SHARE = Number of Pokémon that participated in the fight (if you lack EXP. All)
             = Double the number of Pokémon that fought and did not fight times
               the number of Pokémon in your party (thus dividing it among them all) with it


Statistical Growth



In regards to Pokémon strategy, the exact mechanics of a Pokémon's own growth can be rather interesting, even essential to deciding which Pokémon to choose for your team. These growth mechanics can be useful in determining the exact stats of a Pokémon, or generating comparisons between Pokémon. In this section, we'll discuss the formulas delegating statistical growth.

  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  General  = (Adjusted Base Value             + Adjusted Stat EXP. Gains       + Adjusted DV Gains       + Final Adjustment)
  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MAX HP   = {[(2 * BASE) + 10] * (LV / 100)} + [(sqrt(EXP) / 4) * (LV / 100)] + [DVs * 2 * [(LV / 100)] + LV + 100}
  ATTACK   = {[(2 * BASE) + 5] * (LV / 100)}  + [(sqrt(EXP) / 4) * (LV / 100)] + [DVs * 2 * [(LV / 100)] + 5}
  DEFENSE  = {[(2 * BASE) + 5] * (LV / 100)}  + [(sqrt(EXP) / 4) * (LV / 100)] + [DVs * 2 * [(LV / 100)] + 5} 
  SPECIAL  = {[(2 * BASE) + 5] * (LV / 100)}  + [(sqrt(EXP) / 4) * (LV / 100)] + [DVs * 2 * [(LV / 100)] + 5}
  SPEED    = {[(2 * BASE) + 5] * (LV / 100)}  + [(sqrt(EXP) / 4) * (LV / 100)] + [DVs * 2 * [(LV / 100)] + 5}
  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  "BASE" = The base stat value for this stat on this Pokémon, between 1 and 255 inclusive
  "EXP"  = The Stat Experience on this Pokémon for this stat, between 0 and 65,536 inclusive
  "DVs"  = The number of IVs on this Pokémon for this stat, between 0 and 15 inclusive
  "LV"   = The Pokémon's current level, between 1 and 100 inclusive
The base stats of Pokémon can be found in the Pokémon Stats (General) section.

As you can see, your statistics are proportionate to certain characteristics of the Pokémon: the base stat, which determines general stat growth (75~80 is "average", competition-wise); your level, of course; your Stat EXP., which are earned from beating enemies or certain items; your DVs, which cannot be changed. All of these factors can be manipulated, other than the base stats (unless you count changing the Pokémon), and thus, you can specifically manipulate the growth of stats to the degree where you can calculate the exact stats of a Pokémon at any given level before you even experimentally test these things.



Competitive Pokémon Strategy

NOTE ABOUT RELEVANCE

This competitive guide was originally written from the viewpoint of Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. This guide remains as-is because of the fact that many of the subjects here are still relevant to the game back in the original generation, although mechanics may indeed differ slightly. The skills can still be extrapolated; further, it's mainly because competitive battling is moreso a thing of the most modern games, so ... yeah...


Umm... Yeah, I guess there's not much here - probably something revolving around me being really good at Pokémon. >_> <_< In any case, if there's something else you feel should be covered here, be sure to mention it to me!! (My contact info is in the Legalities section.) 

Also note that the term "competitive" refers to the arena in which players of the game actually battle each other, something itself that goes above and beyond the level of typical in-game strategies. Of course, you don't have to follow these guidelines on the whole: EV-training, IV-breeding, and Nature optimization are things that can take hours more than most strategies. If that's not your thing, remember that, while statistics do play a role, strategy is the most important thing.

In any case, here's the overview for this section:


  • [[Important Notes About This Section|********************** READ THIS FIRST!!!! **********************]]





Important Notes About This Section



Note that none of the stuff here is intended to cover stuff for the main storyline. When it comes to the main story, simply having a balance of Pokémon on your team will do: you shouldn't have to worry about EVs or Natures or particular strategies or anything like that for the main game unless you're honestly pretty terrible at the game. >_> If you go any more specific than that, or want to do so, feel free, but you'll overpower everything else with ease if you do.

This whole section was created in the intent of giving people that helpful "step up" to the competitive level of Pokémon playing against other skilled players. By absolutely no means will this work for everyone: everything here, at least of the initial writing, was written by me after thorough, in-depth observations of how people tend to play, and how successful people tend to play. Subjectivity is inevitable: it may not help you, but it may help the next person, so I simply ask for you to do two things: first to take this with a grain of salt and, second, to respect the opinions herein; "respect" implies nothing about your own agreement with the opinions, but your acceptance of their validity (they work very well for me and for others), and I ask this in no small part because the Pokémon community is rather flammatory and touchy at times. At the same time, that doesn't mean I'm not open to additional opinions or topics to cover: if anything, that's what I'm hoping for, since this FAQ will be certainly viewed by millions (my X/Y FAQ got over 5,000,000 across the Internet, and over 2,000,000 on just GameFAQs, in just 10 months) one could sort of view this as a community project to help out everyone else, especially since anyone who actually does use this will likely branch off and develop their own successful style of play.

Again, this is not to provide the whole of a person's Pokémon strategy, but the foundation for it: the whole "the man who built his house upon the sand" metaphor, if you will. A successful foundation (knowledge) can be built using the standards here, but the point where I leave everyone off is the specific development - on the team structure, Pokémon-specific level - of one's own strategy. I can give you the foundation, but cannot give you the house, which you must build yourself. (Yup, I'm that bad of a contractor lol.) The foundations of all strategies (what I give here) usually converge or are based upon what I put here, but the houses (what you come up with after this) are all unique. But a house cannot stand without a firm foundation: I have encountered a number of teams whose Pokémon don't even differentiate between Special and Physical moves (not even attempting to use mixed-attacker sets, mind you) and thereby are terrible, because they clearly don't have that firm knowledge foundation of what differentiates between Physical and Special and thereby cannot make the most of their power; they are the houses upon the sand. Hopefully, I will make your house the one upon the rock - though whether a grand old mansion is built upon that rock is based upon your application and practical usage of the knowledge and experience you learn here and later.

(This isn't just some Biblical metaphor; it has realistic, proven consequences in the field of psychology, but the "house upon the sand" metaphor is the best way to explain it. It was evidenced by Lev Vygotsky in the earlier part of the 20th century in his work with psychological scaffolding: building the knowledge base that leads people to develop their own conclusions and ideas.)

Every competitive Pokémon player can recall the difficulty and aid they needed when it came to going from someone who could barely beat the Battle Tower to the time where they felt ready to compete on the world level: VERY few of you can honestly attest to not having to do any sort of research or practice, VERY few indeed. That's why this is here: to hopefully lessen that threshold and to help the community as a whole by grouping together lots of competitive-related info in one spot (or to at least make external references to useful tools or other areas in the FAQ) and by allowing people to cotnribute to the effort. I simply ask you don't troll needlessly; if you're going to troll, at least give me something I can add to this to prevent others from trolling or to openly validate why you yourself should have trolled in the first place. And, if you are going to add something, remember that this is based on generalities: I will not include data or strategies for specific Pokémon unless I have good reason to do so, since there are other websites for this sort of info (i.e. Smogon). But few actually explain the basics of strategic battling, or even gather all of the components together (like breeding and EV-training), which is why I'm here.





Learn Your Types!


In Pokémon OR/AS, there are 18 Pokémon types: Normal, Fire, Water, Grass, Electric, Ground, Bug, Dark, Psychic, Ghost, Flying, Rock, Ice, Dragon, Fighting, Poison, Steel, and Fairy. All Pokémon and all moves are attributed to one of these types, kinda like elements. For example, Charmander is a Fire-type Pokémon, and the move Thunderbolt is Electric-type; some Pokémon are dual-typed, like Charizard, who is Fire/Flying. Each type has a certain effectiveness to others: this is the key component in choosing moves. For example, Water-type moves are super-effective on Fire-type Pokémon, and thus do extra damage to them; likewise, Water doesn't do much damage to Dragon. There are even immunities (Normal and Fighting on Ghost, Ghost on Normal, Electric on Ground, Ground on Flying, Dragon on Fairy, and Poison on Steel). Be sure to take into consideration the weaknesses of your Pokémon!



STAB - Same-Type Attack Bonus


It's just an important concept when you decide to choose offensive moves for your Pokémon. Granted, type variety and type coverage are also worth considering greatly; just because you can have Dragonite (Dragon/Flying) learn Outrage (Dragon) and Fly (Flying) doesn't mean you should do so. STAB is the common term used for moves of the same type as the user; moves under such a status will thus have a power bonus of 50% (x1.5), or 100% (x2.0) under the Adaptability ability. If you're left up to choosing moves for offense just for the sake of offense, or just want the most powerful move(s) of a type given certain conditions, or stuff like that, be sure to consider STAB's damage bonus.

The real importance, to some degree, is shown in sweeper Pokémon, who are intended to be able to super-effectively hit a wide variety of Pokémon. For instance, a move that is normally super-effective has a damage multiplier of 2.0x, right? With STAB, it's 3.0x! If it's doubly-super-effective, it's 4.0x, and 6.0x with STAB, or even 8.0x with Adaptability. Keep in mind that the actual coverage of the moves, too, should be considered in this instance. For example, having both a Dragon- and an Ice-type move is generally a bad idea; Dragon is only super-effective to Dragon, while Ice is super-effective to Dragon and Flying and Grass and Ground. The only real reason to have chosen that Dragon-type move over the Ice-type one is a huge difference in power, like usually about double when STAB is accounted for. (Double power is the same as a super-effective attack.) Just a personal note on it; feel free to do as you will.



How to Make a Good Team - A Superficial Guide


This is a brief guide on how to create a good competitive team for true competition against other people, not for in the game against the main story AI or for those who casually battle without much of a care (simple type balance will suffice for either of those natures, really), but for the competitors who want to try to have the best team possible. This guide is by no means a good one, though; it is not thorough, and there's a good bit assumed on the knowledge of the reader (especially because I wrote this a good time after becoming "good", so this is more instinct for me and the process I go through). Feel free to contribute something!

Step #0 - The Basest of All Knowledge: Before you should even consider battling competitively, one thing you'll want to master is types' resistances, weaknesses, and immunities, as I already noted. You need to know how these types interact, both when a Pokémon has one type, two types, and even be able to extrapolate how a third type will affect things (unlikely as it may be to occur). You should also learn the types of all Pokémon. This affects everything you will ultimately ever do competitively. This will help you determine what is truly a balanced or imbalanced team. This will help you determine when to stay in for the kill or switch out to avoid being killed. Types are at the heart of Pokémon strategy, and coming in without that knowledge is much like swinging at a piñata while blindfolded: you fail to know where both you and your foe stand, though that piñata can clearly see both of you.

Furthermore, you need to learn the type of every move and Pokémon: otherwise, you cannot apply the knowledge of the type matchups. This is a bit more formidable: some Pokémon appear their type, but then others are starkly different. (Blaziken, for example, clearly looks to be a Fire and a Fighting type. However, who would think Metagross to be part-Psychic or Florges to be a Fairy just on appearances?) Part of this will be made easier by repeated experience with Pokémon battling and through rote learning: either one works. (So does writing Pokémon FAQs! lol)

Step #1 - Choosing the Type of Battle: For starters, your team needs to have a strategy fitting the type of battle you want. Double and Triple Battles take a lot more strategy to work for than Single Battles because multiple Pokémon are on the field at once. Just because Earthquake is a powerful move doesn't mean you need it in a Triple Battle, for example. I mean, you need a way to try to deal with the damage your other one or two allying Pokémon would get. Also try to understand the mechanics of the battle you are trying to deal with. For example, understand the definition of a Long Range move for Triple Battles; that will be insanely important when it comes to putting someone in a certain slot at any point in the battle. Most of the strategy in any kind of battle will be derived simply from definitions or certain roles of Pokémon; for example, Support Pokémon are much more common in Triple Battles than Single Battles.

Some common notes for each:

Single Battles: In Single Battles (the most popular of competitive battling fields, and thus the one with the most knowledge available), one of the biggest themes is Entry Hazards-setting Pokémon, at least in the competitive field. These allow you to set up a way to nullify Sturdy and the like and, more obviously, deal damage to all sorts of Pokémon to come after the first. Even if you remove 1/8 of the foe's HP per Pokémon, you're talking about damage equivalent to 3/4 of the foe's HP across six (were that even possible). The best hazard setter is probably Skarmory since it can use Stealth Rocks (the most directly potent one), learn Defog (to get rid of the hazards the foe uses on you), and use Roar/Whirlwind to force the foe to switch, forcing damage accumulation.

Another common theme in Singles are walling Pokémon. Unless those types with multiple battling Pokémon, there's only one foe on each side of the field, so prediction is pretty easy. Thus, you can easily see when a walling Pokémon will be at an advantage as it will take little damage from the predicted attack, and can even force the foe to switch if done right. Blissey qualifies as THE Special-wall, boasting insane HP and decent Sp. Def.: personally, Eviolite Chansey (slightly lower in each regard, and then boosted with Eviolite's 50% boost) is better, but to each their own. Physical walls are pretty variable.

There isn't much else common to Singles teams aside from these, at least nothing popular of note.

Double Battles: In Double Battles - the most balanced of all battle types: if you hate Smogon Singles, for Christ's sake, stop whining and play these! - statistics and walling and all that junk takes less precedence. While they by all means matter, prediction and strategy suddenly take the spotlight: you now have two Pokémon per side. Even Pokémon that would be labeled Uber by Smogon can easily fall if it just because of a focused strike.

In Doubles, competitive battling is much less predictable: common themes are few, but those that exist have strong, obvious builds. Weather teams and Trick Room teams become much more valuable, however, due to the multiple influences: teams using these tend to use the weather setter and a primary beneficiary for the opening. By the latter term, I mean someone who would benefit the most on the team. For example, on a Sandstorm team, a Pokémon with Sand Rush or Sand Force is invaluable. On a Trick Room team, a really slow, bulky attacker works quite well. So on and so forth.

Teams built around Intimidate also exist: these teams seek to use 2-4 Pokémon with the Intimidate ability on their team, repeatedly switching out or something so as to lower the foes' Attack. While unusually common as of late, they are particularly gimmicky as Special-oriented teams (even to a slight extent) fell them easily.

Similarly, teams built around Lightning Rod and Storm Drain seek to boost their allies' Sp. Atk. Teams built around Lightning Rod will have Pokémon using Discharge so as to hit the Lightning Rod Pokémon, and those with Storm Drain tend to use Surf to hit the Storm Drain Pokémon. Each time one of these moves hits the corresponding ability wielder, it raises their Sp. Atk. by one stage: some teams will even open with two such ability wielders and use two Discharges/Surfs and double their Sp. Atk. off the bat. However, teams built around this are particularly imbalanced in terms of type.

The Support-style opening is also quite common, and is a fair threat. The opponent will usually open with a Pokémon which is powerful and a Pokémon to support it. The powerful Pokémon is often a Mega Pokémon and/or a sweeper. The Support Pokémon has a number of forms: Talonflame, Meowstic, Sableye, and Whimsicott are the more common ones. They will usually use Tailwind or Helping Hand to ridiculously aid their team: Reflect, Light Screen, and/or Safeguard are also common. They can also take a more "offensive" stance with hindering their foe: a Thunder Wave to induce Paralysis and halve Speed, perhaps, or maybe a Will-O-Wisp to burn and halve Attack. Support Pokémon - either for true support or to ail the foe - are not to be taken lightly, and Pranksters especially.

Multi-target moves are a commonality. Multi-target moves include those like Discharge, Earthquake, Heat Wave, Water Spout, Surf, and so on, that hit multiple Pokémon at once. While powerful in Single Battles, these moves will lose 1/4 of their power, being reduced to 75% power if they attempt to hit more than one Pokémon. This will normally suggest the use of their single-target versions (Fire Blast over Heat Wave, for example), but there is a key point to using them, and it is the most superficial: to hit, and possibly KO, multiple Pokémon. However, be careful as to how you use them. You don't want to activate Flash Fire or Storm Drain, for example. You also don't want the damage to be pointless. Pokémon using these are often boosted by weather (Heat Wave, Surf), ability (Sand Force in Sandstorm), or Choice item (Heat Wave on a Specs Chandelure is common), and these boosts make the moves back into significant threats. At the same time, multi-target moves can be easily countered as their users are usually quite obvious, and there are also obvious counters: Lightning Rod and Storm Drain are examples. Even putting Pokémon like that in can induce the foe to switch.

I also cannot emphasize the importance of the move Protect or its likeness in Detect in multi-Pokémon battles such as this: skillful prediction will allow you to avoid a KO and also use your other Pokémon to get in enough damage to perhaps force that attacker's KO on the next turn, saving you pain and another Pokémon. It's very useful once you get used to predicting moves. Furthermore, you'll even be privy to part of your foe's moveset, which is just simply invaluable since you can even guess at what they're aiming at doing (which doesn't have to be a simple KO attempt) and act accordingly. In fact, Protect/Detect are best used whenever your Pokémon is at threat: this threat includes the potential for a super-effective attack (STAB ones are particularly nasty, but the easiest to predict in this fashion) and the ability to introduce detrimental ailments (Burns being the most lethal to physical attackers and Paralysis or Sleep in general). Even that one Protect gives you an eye into everything your foe does ... do not waste this knowledge.

Triple Battles: Triple Battles are the weird cousin of Double Battles that likes to lock himself in the basement: not many people tend to play Triples. Why? Triple Battles are a firefest of weather/Trick Room teams and multi-target moves. Imagine them as Double Battles on steroids, the balancing concept taken too far in reference to Singles that it creates openings for gimmicks. For example, Sturdy Shedinja or Beat Up on a Justified Pokémon are annoyingly common and, even if gimmicky, still quite lethal. Multi-target moves - particularly whenever there's Tailwind aiding the user, more or less forcing their move to be first - also are very common.

Rotation Battles: If Triple Battles are the weird cousin, Rotation Battles are the dude that is in the mental institution. Rotation Battles are very much like Singles, but with one key aspect: a huge, huge, huge, HUUUUUUUUUUUUGE reliance on prediction, so much so that it is almost insane. Not much can truly be said: prediction is all that really matters in a Rotation Battle.

Step #2 - Pokémon Role Choice: The main thing, first, is to decide what kind of roles you want on your team. Do you want "this many" strong, sweeper Pokémon (Lucario, Dragonite)? Support Pokémon (Prankster Meowstic, Klefki)? Pokémon that cripple with statuses (Smeargle, Sableye)? Pokémon that play mind games with your opponents (Zoroark)? Pokémon that benefit from weather (Mega-Garchomp, Excadrill)? You can't simply choose the Pokémon you necessarily like; I mean, I like Pikachu (and so do many others: it's the series mascot!), but it's so flimsy, and the Light Ball isn't a lot of a boost when compared to other Pokémon. I mean, going on just what you like works and all at times, but it's not the best thing to rely on: you'll need to adapt to be a true competitor.

The MOST important thing about this, however, is to think about a balance of roles. For example, six physical attackers is an example of an imbalance. Why? Teams revolving around the use of Intimidate or the use of Counter or the use of Reflect will cream you easily, mostly because it's not hard to spot out a physical attacker. (Or a Pokémon of any role, for the most part: that itself, the ability to spot out the role and strategy a particular Pokémon plays on instinct, before it makes a move, is a key part of becoming a great competitor, but it will only be honed through practice, really. Some details regarding such "prediction" can be found in [[In-Battle Prediction|this section]].) That said, I'm not saying a team of six should have six completely different roles, either. What you want, in general, is a centralized synergetic attacking core of two to four Pokémon (generally about half of the team). This can be balanced in any way you prefer, so long as it is not completely of one attacking role: for example, I tend to find two physical attackers and two or three special attackers on a six-Pokémon team to balance well. If you want to go for an all-offense team, that works fine, too: a 3-to-3 ratio (when considering physical/special only) is generally good. After all, this latter thing gives you more flexibility in who you bring out, since you now have 24 moves to play with, rather than 16 offensive and 8 status (on a general level). Each have their benefits.

Step #3 - Choosing Pokémon for Those Roles: Next, think about Pokémon that fit these chosen roles. It helps to narrow them down once you have the roles named. For example, if you want six physically-strong, offensive Pokémon for a direct offense, you don't want six Gengar, right? That'd be a huge disadvantage (not to mention impossible in VGC play). You do want to consider the Pokémon of those roles that have the best statistics for that role and can execute the roles well through their moves and their abilities. For example, you might want a revenge killer. So a Pokémon that lacks a priority move (or the ability to use such) is not a good choice, no matter how strong or how fast. Or you might want a physical sweeper, in which case Gengar is off the table, as his Attack is poor in comparison to his Special Attack. You want to create a varied party that makes it so that no one type or Pokémon can sweep your team, or get as close to that as possible as most teams have one niche counter. You want a party that has no inherent single-Pokémon counters against itself if you can at all manage it.

(In terms of common weaknesses and move repetition... You generally want no more than two Pokémon having the same weakness on your team, and the same type of damaging move (i.e. Taunt won't count to this) repeated twice. This makes it easier for someone to get a Speed advantage over you and begin killing straight up. For example, Greninja with Ice Beam can easily kill off both Haxorus and Landorus-Therian: neither share any of their actual types, but both share the weakness. It's very hard to avoid keeping common weaknesses out of the formula, however, and trying can be very restrictive on your team: I'd say having no more than any two Pokémon share the same weakness be ideal.)

In a footnote to the previous statements, though: That's how it works in most cases - there are benefits to using a team heavy in or completely of a single type, known as Monotyping. You might see this on people inexperienced with making weather-based teams, for example, but yet somehow are actually good at using the team for a reason they don't entirely know. See, with a Monotype team, if you can get rid of the main threats the opposing team has against you, then you're good: Monotyping lowers the number of those possible threats, even, which means some teams might not be completely prepared to fight against you at all. Then again... Take a Fire Monotype team, such as Mega Charizard X, Ninetales, Arcanine, Talonflame, Rotom-Heat, and Blaziken. For the most part, especially in Double/Triple Battles, Aerodactyl (Rock/Flying) could one-hit most of these Pokémon with a Choice Band Rock Slide or Stone Edge, and Aerodactyl is faster than most of those Pokémon, barring Speed Boosted Blaziken and priority moves, meaning you'd usually get killed before a move could get off. In Monotype teams, being able to counter all threats - not at the level of mere type, but of actual Pokémon species, and maybe even some of their specific strategies - is of utomost importance. For example, on a Fire Monotype team, the best counter one could get for Aerodactyl would probably be Camerupt: he can use Rock Slide or Stone Edge, which are super-effective on Aerodactyl; he has the Attack stat to back this up even without STAB, and is bulky enough with a good enough EV/IV/Nature set to be able to take even an Earthquake from Aerodactyl.

Step #3.5 - Developing the Pokémon & Error Prevention: Okay, it's one thing to choose a Pokémon, but it's another to actually create a strategy for it. I've seen a number of teams on forums that are simply complete crap, not because of lack of skill but lack of understanding. Some people simply do not understand how to develop their Pokémon properly. I won't deny that there is a number of viable ways for any Pokémon to be developed - I could probably give you two dozen equally valid Dragonite sets. However, while there is no right way to do it, there are definitely wrong ways to do it.

Some of the more common errors I see regard how to give a Pokémon EVs and Nature. Depending on the Pokémon, there are a number of sets that equally work, but for some Pokémon there is just one set that actually really works. For example, take Blaziken: a very fast physical-attacking Pokémon, especially given Speed Boost. What EV set would you give it? Unless you said 252 Attack, 252 Speed, and 4 of something else (unless you're deciding to use a Special moveset, which can work out), you screwed up somewhere as you want to enhance what the Pokémon has done well. There are a number of generalized EV sets each Pokémon tend to use:


  • Attacker (Fast): 252 of (usually) best offensive stat, 252 Speed, 4 something else (HP, Defense, Sp. Def.)
  • Attacker (Slow, Good Defenses): 252 of (usually) best offensive stat, 252 HP, 4 something else
  • Attacker (Slow, Uneven Defenses): 252 of (usually) best offensive stat, 256 towards equalizing Defenses
  • Attacker (Slow, Sore Weakness): 252 of (usually) best offensive stat, 252 to preventing that big weakness (like 252 to Sp. Def. to help prevent Ice Beam on Dragonite), 4 HP
  • Attacker (Bulky, Already Powerful): 252 Defense, 252 Sp. Def., 4 HP -or- 252 HP, 256 to equalize the Defenses
  • Attacker (Mixed): Usually specific to the Pokémon
  • Attacker (Eviolite): 252 to best offensive stat, 256 to equalize Defenses (absolutely none for HP, all Defense)
  • Status User (Fast): 252 HP, 252 Speed, 4 something else - usually best for those using Taunt or the like
  • Status User (Bulky): 252 HP, 256 to equalizing Defenses
  • Transformer: 252 HP, 252 Speed, 4 to something (doesn't matter)

These EV sets, as you notice, do one thing: prioritize the betterment of the Pokémon in what it does best. I won't say these are the only valid sets (look up some for Rotom-Wash one day), but are the most common and are a good place to start before making your own. For example, it is unwise to give Gengar 252 EVs in Attack because it is just a crap Physical user. And similarly you should not give it Shadow Claw, a Physical move. However, as time goes on, you need to remember to tweak these sets such that you KO mostly who you need to KO. For example, if you're KO'ing a Pokémon that is a significant problem to your team, and are just under 1HKO'ing a different Pokémon, you want to keep it so that the first is always a OHKO and the second a 2HKO. It doesn't make much sense, I suppose. >_> Point is, you want to OHKO common threats and outspeed others, and then once that threshold is met, devote other EVs to Defenses and HP, but it really depends. 

After all, if you're outspeeding a Pokémon by 16 points in Speed and aren't outspeeding anyone's other common sets (for example, Choice Scarf Garchomp or Landorus is common, but you never see Choice Scarf Marowak or Escavalier, right?), you can take off 60 EVs (15 points) so you're just outspeeding that Pokémon by 1 point, a guaranteed move first barring Tailwind and the other sets that are uncommon from your research as to be pointless. Furthermore, if that Pokémon you're outspeeding really isn't a threat your team (think "team" in this stuff: this one Pokémon you're optimizing may not be threatened by it, but another on your team might, like in the case of Metagross and Talonflame when optimizing against Aerodactyl), you can go down more from there in terms of Speed and devote even more EVs to your Defenses! Bulk is heavily undervalued in the Pokémon metagame (outside of OU on Pokémon Showdown for some stupid reason): the difference between a OHKO and a 2HKO can literally make all the difference in a battle, even if that it just 1 HP. That 1 HP will allow that Pokémon to move again, allow it to even possibly throw in another KO. DO NOT undervalue bulk; you should not focus solely on power and speed, but neither should you focus on just bulk. You want that ideal balance: you want to be able rip some Pokémon apart in as few moves as possible and with as much speed as is reasonable, but you also want to have the bulk (even if it is just 2 or 3 points extra in HP) so you may be able to survive the hits your opponent is throwing at you. The battles may ultimately boil down to strategy and luck, but they are sitting on the table opposite from the statistics, which are just as important. A team with a great tactic can be brought down in very few moves just because it was too frail to enact that same strategy. But, on the other side of things, a team of strong, bulky Pokémon is easily brought down just because it was too slow to act (the common flaw in Trick Room teams is that exact reason: once the Trick Room setters are gone, the Pokémon are basically sitting ducks for those who are faster).

There is another problem I often see, though: people optimizing stats they shouldn't optimize, neglecting the Pokémon's best characteristics. I'm not saying the instances where a Pokémon can be (more or less) equally valid as a Physical, Special, or mixed attacker; I mean like with, say, Beedrill-Mega, who has TERRIBLE Special Attack (base 15), being given Special moves, where there is no question of validity.

A similar issue occurs with Nature: you should choose a Nature that enhances your Pokémon, usually as follows:


  • Physical Attacker (Fast): Jolly or Adamant, depending on base Attack
  • Physical Attacker (Slow): Adamant
  • Physical Attacker (Trick Room/Weather Setter): Brave
  • Special Attacker (Fast): Timid or Modest, depending on base Sp. Atk.
  • Special Attacker (Slow): Modest
  • Special Attacker (Trick Room/Weather Setter): Quiet
  • Mixed Attacker/Status Users: Variable: usually a Defense or Speed compensator that lowers Attack as a mild Foul Play counter

As with the EV thing, I won't say they're the only ones. For example, I tend to use Quiet Nature on my Aegislash when not in Trick Room: it usually depends on your strategy and moves, but again these are the most common Natures you'll often see. And again they serve the same purpose: to accentuate what the Pokémon does well. A dedicated Physical-attacking Pokémon should absolutely never have anything lowering its Attack, for example, and probably not Speed: it doesn't have to raise them, either, but you don't want them to go down. To further an example you'll see in a moment, you should not use Timid or Modest Haxorus because not only is he a crappy Special Attacker but it weakens the Physical moves you do use.

Finally, the biggest and most prolific problem I see tends to regard move choice. When choosing a Pokémon's moves, particularly those of a Pokémon that has a great difference in Attack and Sp. Atk., it should be able to complement the Pokémon's base stats; you can see those in the Mini-Pokédex later in the guide. Base stats dictate the Pokémon's statistical growth throughout the game. For example, take Haxorus, who has the following base stats:


# Species Type Abilities HP Atk. Def. Sp.Atk. Sp.Def. Speed
#612 Haxorus Dragon Mold Breaker, Rivalry, Unnerve 76 147 90 60 70 97

Notice how Haxorus has much higher base Attack (147) to his Special Attack (60). On average, his Attack will be at least 2.5 times more than his Special Attack; at Level 100, discounting EVs, IVs, and Nature, Haxorus will have a whopping 299 Attack (432 with max influence) whereas he can only have 125 Sp. Atk. (240 at the most), which is very weak. Thus, which would it be best to give Haxorus: Dragon Claw, Dragon Pulse, or both? Dragon Claw is a Physical move, and Dragon Pulse is Special. Since your Attack is going to be way higher than your Sp. Atk. - heck, it's going to be higher even if you maximize Sp. Atk. and minimize Attack - it would be best to maximize your damage output, and thereby give it Dragon Claw.

"Hey, why not Outrage? It's stronger!" To understand this furthering of my example, you must understand something about Pokémon battles. Play a few Pokémon battles online with someone in Pokémon Showdown (Google it) or even just your own game; observe how little PP you consume. The average Pokémon battle in Singles lasts no more than 10~20 turns, and usually only about 5~10. In Doubles, it's closer to 3~8 in most cases, and in Triples it drastically can vary from 2~8 in my experience, at least on average. Most inexperienced people would want Outrage in addition to Dragon Claw, because it is stronger and also benefits from STAB. While this is true, observe how you are EXTREMELY unlikely to consume all of Dragon Claw's PP. Therefore, the redundancy in having Outrage is only detrimental when you also have Dragon Claw, because you are more or less wasting a move slot for another Dragon move.

"But it's stronger you moron!" Again, this is true. However, you should look at it like this: every moveslot should serve a purpose. If you have to fill a moveslot with some random, crap move, then the Pokémon itself probably is crap: any Pokémon, within reason, should have 4 at least half-decent moves it can use. It needs to be able to serve a purpose. Now, obviously, Outrage has the purpose of dealing damage. In fact, it does more than Dragon Claw. However, keep in mind that Outrage "traps" the user for 2~3 turns, confusing them after the use of that move; it is very easy for the foe to switch in with an advantageous type, such as a Fairy, and outright win. Power it may have, but the confusion and the trapping is very disadvantageous in the long run. It therefore doesn't serve much of a purpose to have Outrage over Dragon Claw, except as a "nuke" or "last ditch" move, though the instances in which you can't find another move to use over such a move are very infrequent. In other words, the move's Power is not meant to be the only consideration you take into account!

What about an instance where two moves of the same type can be logically used? Well, firstly, let's continue our previous argument by saying such instances are relatively rare; if you're even bothering to use two damaging moves of the same type, you are most often just detracting from the value of the Pokémon. One of the most well-known instances of valid moves of the same type are the moves Psychic and Psyshock. Both moves are of the Psychic type and have very similar powers (90 and 80 respectively), 100% accuracy, and use the user's Sp. Atk. for damage. However, they use the foe's Sp. Def. and Defense respectively for damage as well. This can be very significant: for example, if you're facing Blissey, it's better to use Psyshock, and better to use Psychic for non-Special walls in other instances. Psyshock serves a valuable niche role whose value can be easily seen when you actually memorize Pokémon base stats: so long as the target has at least 1.125x more Sp. Def. than Defense, Psyshock is more powerful -- and, remember, the Defense stats on a Pokémon are rarely equal.

Now, back to the argument about serving a purpose. Every move must have a purpose in battle of some sort; if it serves a relatively niche purpose, like the Psychic/Psyshock dilemma, that's fine, but keep in mind I said "relatively". When it comes to the consideration of a move's purpose, you must also consider how well the Pokémon will be able to execute it, again like the Dragon Pulse/Dragon Claw thing with Haxorus I mentioned earlier. There are more complex instances, however; Haxorus is great for sweeping, so it's logically going to have four moves of different types. Pokémon oriented more to generalized Physical- or Special-attacking will likely have one or two status moves in their backup. How would you determine if a move in these instances is valid enough for real use?

For example, should Talonflame have Steel Wing? Talonflame is indisputably weak to Rock moves: in virtually every non-Focus Sash instance of him, I've see Rock moves OHKO him with ease. Steel Wing would counter Rock Pokémon, right? Seems logical. However, remember that Talonflame has relatively low Attack, a base of 80-something. Most Rock Pokémon will barely lose 20%~35% of their HP from Talonflame's Steel Wing, so it's not really that good a move. However, can we actually replace it with a good move? Remember, if Steel Wing is crap, what's better on it, assuming we already have Flare Blitz and Brave Bird/Acrobatics like most people do? It serves a purpose, after all, albeit poorly so. And, from observation of its moveset, there aren't many attacking moves that serve us well. This is where we tend to dip into the status moves: remember, on non-sweepers, we want each damaging move to serve a purpose very well, not just to fill a slot, because status moves can have a huge change in the dynamics of the battle in general. For example, Tailwind would be a good move to have on Talonflame: it would expose even its biggest counter in Aerodactyl to the concerns resultant from its own weaknesses, despite its own speed. Or perhaps Will-O-Wisp if your target is physical: Will-O-Wisp makes a nice way to [[Burn|burn]] the target and in turn weaken their Attack significantly by 50%. Perhaps he could even use Sunny Day as a way to back-up your Drought Pokémon on a Sun team? While none of these moves deal direct damage, you can see how they enhance your own ability to deal damage or inhibit that of your foe.

So, to sum up about movesets, I will make two points. Firstly, every move should have a known purpose: niche purposes are fine, but they have to be relatively wide niches, not Pokémon-specific unless that Pokémon is the only viable counter. Secondly, avoid redundancy wherever possible, on both your team and the Pokémon itself. For example, let's say that you are going to use Tyranitar, who is slow: having both Crunch and Payback, both Physical Dark moves, is redundant. If you intend on using Payback, slow down T-Tar as much as possible, and for Crunch speed him up. They hit the same weaknesses and have the same priority, but one is noticeably better than the other in given situations so it is more advantageous to trash one and replace it with something that can serve a further use.

Step #4 - Identifying Counters and Flaws & Synergy: The problem with any theoretical team, Monotyping or not? All Pokémon have counters - without exception, there will be at least one Pokémon with one move or moveset that WILL be able to fully defeat your Pokémon in some manner. Blaziken, I predict, will become popular in OR/AS play because of how he's a strong starter that can Mega-Evolve (and could for a while, since X/Y), albeit not the only Hoenn starter that can. However, take Talonflame with Gale Wings: barring Protect or the like from Blaziken, Talonflame's Brave Bird will go first and will OHKO him in most circumstances. If you're dead-set on the Pokémon you want in your team, you need to develop those Pokémon so that they can cover each other. For example, if I want Blaziken, I will also have Aerodactyl: a fast, decently-powerful counter Pokémon to beat up Talonflame and the other fast Flying Pokémon that would beat Blaziken.

This kind of synchronicity is the absolute most important part of your team! Also be aware of other kinds of synchronicity that go far beyond simple types, such as the type for which weather teams are most known; for example, Sandstorm teams like to use Pokémon (e.g. Mega-Garchomp, Landorus, Excadrill) with Sand Force to further increase their damage output, so be sure to consider every angle. Support Pokémon with properly-timed and properly-used moves also create a synergy of their own since they increase the effectiveness of your team: I've been able to have Mega Charizard Y sweep three Pokémon off the field in Triple Battles via Heat Wave (not even supereffective, and from full HP) just due to a well-chosen Helping Hand and Tailwind. So long as your team won't be swept away, and yet they can also work together through most situations, then they're good. Several runs through a Battle Test or a few dozen battles in Pokémon Showdown with a success rate of 80+% in the latter is generally a great team.

There is a bit of a quicker way to determine whether a team has flaws, of course. There is this "Break My Team" calculator/program one can find tangentially to the Pokémon Showdown site -- it is at http://sweepercalc.com/brmt/. What this particular thing will do is allow you to import a team of up to six Pokémon via their Pokémon Showdown data, or generally just fill in their stats, and confine your battling situation to a set of norms. (For example, Trick Room team, VGC-style team, Doubles team, Level X battling, etc.) You can then figure out the Pokémon that will be best angled to hurt your team. This will show the general set of EVs/Nature/item/boosts they will likely run and then the move and damage dealt to you. There is usually at least one such sweeping Pokémon against a team that will be able to one-hit-KO them all at some point, and often even more if the team is specifically geared to a certain purpose (like a Sandstorm team). That doesn't necessarily mean that the team as a whole is bad; if anything, if you can narrow it down to just one niche Pokémon, you're well on your way to making a great team. What you ought to do with this data is to create ways your team can counter the/those Pokémon by changing your team's movesets slightly. For example, a Sandstorm team is generally swept away by Crawdaunt with Choice Band and Crabhammer (or a few other moves, depending on the Pokémon). Tbus, since I'd likely be using Tyranitar, I would give him a Focus Sash set and give him the move Thunderbolt. Or I could use a Focus Sash set for Metagross or Rhyperior and have him pound the Crawdaunt with Hammer Arm, probably followed by Bullet Punch should that fail. Or I could even go ahead and include Elektross on my team: he can easily counter Crawdaunt, is pretty bulky and powerful, and will even be immune to the myriad Earthquakes my Sandstorm team will spew in Doubles and Triples! Most of the counters will indeed mostly be the addition of a Focus Sash, and that alone is no guarantee of any real success: priority attacks, for example, completely foil such strategies, not to mention the fact that you simply can't have more than one Focus Sash per VGC or Battle Spot team. That's why I suggested Eelektross: for the synergy he also brings. It also helps to perfectly exemplify that why, while an inept near-Monotype weather team can do unexpectedly well, variance should be given to the same weather teams, and in general variety should be used because, while the same team may make awesome victories, they may lose just because one certain Pokémon was used. By all means go ahead and make as many Pokémon compatible with your weather type as you can, but do consider variance as well: Armaldo, for example, would work great on a Rain Dance team because he has nice Attack and Swift Swim, and given his movepool will be a nice counter to the Water Pokémon's counters in Grass (via X-Scissor) and Electric (via Earthquake). He also can benefit from Sandstorm's Sp. Def. boost since Sandstorm-setters are the main ones that will be going before Rain setters in a Rain-vs.-Sandstorm battle, so there's huge value there. You may have to make a team in which not all of your Pokémon benefit from the weather, just to lessen the number of sweeping counters to your team by inherently countering those counters. In any case, my two cents.

Step #5 - Practice Makes Perfect: Think you have a good team? Before you waste time breeding and training the team in-game, how about playing some Pokémon Showdown? Pokémon Showdown - just Google it! - is an online Pokémon battle simulator in which you are matched up with other players around the world in Pokémon battles. You can set up a team as wanted, with the exact set of EVs, IVs, moves, nature, anything you want, really; you can even play specialized metagames (such as 1v1 (only one Pokémon per team), Monotypes (everyone must be of or part of a single type), or Hackmons (any Pokémon, any ability, any moves)). By setting up the team and thus battling against others on Pokémon Showdown (just one battle won't do it, mind you; a good estimate can be found through 30 or 40 battles, IMO), you will be able to quickly identify flaws in your team and be able to improve upon that. Remember, those flaws could be critical, and thus could cause you to have to rebreed a Pokémon from scratch (like Nature); the ability to simulate a battle will be invaluable to saving you time when it comes to needing to possibly rebreed the same Pokémon multiple times for the right Nature or Ability.

Step #6 - Breeding the Team: Now that the theoretical/research/simulation part is done, you must simply breed the Pokémon for their IVs and Nature and Egg Moves as appropriate, then EV train them to the levels where they evolve and learn moves properly. That stuff is mostly covered in other sections, though.

Step #7 - Prove Your Might!: Now use that team! Now that your team has been sim-tested and bred, it's a nice time to put 'er through the actual online competition. The big thing as you battle is to be able to learn from your mistakes, and correct them if necessary. Minor ones, like a bad moveset or incorrect EVs, are relatively easy to correct, while nature or IVs or egg moves can require rebreeding. Don't be scared or disappointed to rebreed a Pokémon. Let your battles inspire you to create a good team; correct your flaws and move on. If you discover or realize a new technique you never considered, feel free to test it out. The main thing is to never be that moron that thinks "Oh, my team's the best, I don't need to fix anything". All teams will have flaws. All teams. Without exception. With that in mind, be willing to do minor fixes to your own team as time goes on, and be open to new ideas. I never thought I'd want to use Aegislash after messing around with it some, for example, despite its power, due to its flimsiness in its Sword Forme. Then I figured a great way around that. It's not flawless, but it works. But it required me to change from the priority-attacking set it had, and thus meant rebreeding. Be open-minded, and be ready to learn, even though your team is battle-ready; with 721 Pokémon in the game as of now, and millions of ways to customize them, you should always be ready, at any second, to learn something new, for there is no way to know everything about Pokémon and Pokémon strategy - there are 1,073,741,824 different ways to arrange your IVs alone, and well around 10^1000 -- that's a "1" followed by 1,000 zeroes! -- combinations when you bring in EVs, Nature, and Pokémon species, abilities, levels, genders, items, and moves.

Step #8 - Believe in Yourself: But, despite the fact that every team has flaws, and despite how much strategization and research one might put into a team, there is a single key element that makes the difference -- belief. I don't care if you somehow do create the ultimate Pokémon team with no inherent counters; if you do not believe your team is worth having, no one will. It may sound cliché, but it does have a psychological basis - if you do not believe you can do it, you are inherently setting yourself up for failure. I don't give a crap what anyone else says about my team, nor should you value your team simply upon the evaluations other people give -- if you truly and earnestly believe your team is a great team, then that perhaps may be all you need. (That said, do be open to the criticisms others give, but be sure to also weigh them: don't accept/reject mindlessly, but consider them.) Personally, I value a team whose worth is beyond mere words, a team whose strategy and value you cannot easily voice, cannot quite put into words: I've tried many a time to get my current team in a "Rate My Team" topic on the message boards before (mind you, a team that's gotten me into the Top 500 on both Pokémon Showdown and the Pokémon X/Y Rated Battles), but I can never quite put their value into words. The difference between my team and the general Pokémon team is that one element of faith: I believe my team is good, and I believe I can win. I know my team inside and out, and even in some ways I probably can't voice; I believe in them, and that's why I feel my team to be good: not because it's the best, but because it's my best, and I know it.

Step #9 - Removal of Flaws After Creation: I know, it's not a lot as to how to make a great team. It's very superficial. I've spent months simply optimizing my current team as it is. But keep in mind that there is no perfect team; for, if there was, everyone would use it, right? The main thing you can do is to keep improving your team in minor ways. I've had to re-EV train some of my Pokémon three or four times just to fit certain strategies a little better, and sometimes I've had to scrap Pokémon or the whole team entirely. Your team will not be perfect, and you will never go for an extended period of time without a loss. Take these losses and learn from them; learn what was wrong with your team, learn what was wrong with your execution, and use that so that you don't screw up as much. You never know, you might even get a new idea for a new team or for a new strategy that could take you in whole new directions. Ultimately, it can be summed up as this: there is no perfect Pokémon team; so long as you are satisfied with the one you have - a team you love, a team you know inside and out - then that's as perfect as is needed. After all, once you believe you've got as perfect a team as you can possibly manage, Pokémon itself should be focused upon with nothing more than the attitude originally given to it: it is a game, so simply have fun! =D





Common Pokémon Roles


This is an analysis of the general roles you'll find people use for Pokémon; again, not every role is here, mostly because some Pokémon can fit multiple roles, and other roles are usually only compatible with a niche few Pokémon. This is a generalized section, mind you; I am not going into detail about each role that an individual Pokémon or restrictive set thereof could or should play, simply because I don't have the time. Smogon is probably the site for that.

Nuke: This term does not apply to one Pokémon necessarily as a role, but moreso as a specific move it has; thus, why I posted this one first. A nuking move is often a filler move when the player cannot find a good other move to put in there, though it sometimes can be part of their strategic. Nuking moves are typically used with the intent of high-power, high-reward: these moves include those like Overheat, V-Create, and Draco Meteor which weaken the user after use, but it can be extended to any extremely powerful move that has some drawback. Because of this drawback, it is often only used once, and usually as a last-ditch move: like "I know I'm going to die, so I may as well deal what damage I can". Their viability (except with White Herb in a set few instances) is usually pretty low in most cases. The most notable case of a viable version of this is Salamence with Moxie in which Salamence uses Draco Meteor for a OHKO and then the Moxie boosts its Attack so that it doesn't need Draco Meteor again.

Physical Attacker: This Pokémon typically will have a base Attack stat of 125+ for general competition. Depending on the Pokémon's other stats, people can go bulky (Adamant + 252 EVs in Attack and HP or Adamant + 252 Attack EVs + EVs to equalize Def./Sp.Def. and then the rest go for HP) or people can go a fast, powerful striker (Adamant or Jolly + 252 Attack EVs and 252 Speed EVs). Whether to favor Attack or Speed in the latter is up to you. Most will run Jolly unless the Pokémon is very fast, though, such as with Talonflame or when using Choice Scarf when most would not expect this. Pokémon like this also tend to use one of several items: a Choice Band (especially on Outragers and Thrashers), a Choice Scarf (for speed), a Life Orb (for flexibility on fast sweepers), an Expert Belt (flexibility without HP loss), a Leftovers (for bulky ones or as "nothing else worth using"), or a Shell Bell (for exceptionally powerful and speedy Pokémon - and I mean VERY). Example Pokémon for bulky physical attackers would include Conkeldurr, Multiscale Dragonite, and Mega-Mawile; good speedy physical attackers would include Blaziken, Haxorus, and Talonflame. When choosing a Physical Attacker's moveset, it's wise to not just use all attacking moves. Don't get me wrong, you will want two or three usually. However, keeping that one status move will help to check other Pokémon. For example, say someone brings out a Pokémon that likes to clearly uses status ailments, such as Rotom-Wash with Will-O-Wisp: Taunt can be a viable option. Other Pokémon have status moves for the sake of set-up sweeping, as noted later. But the only real reason to use an all-offense moveset is due to Choice item usage so you can have maximum coverage.

Special Attacker: Essentially, you can imagine this as a Special-oriented attacker, rather than a physical one. There are no particular widespread advantages to one or the other, though. Typical bulky Special Attackers will use a Modest nature with 252 Sp. Atk. EVs and equalizing Def./Sp.Def. or just all to HP. If speedy, they prefer Modest or Timid with 252 Sp.Atk. EVs and 252 Speed EVs. The items essentially remain the same, although Choice Specs would clearly be favored over Choice Bands. =P Good speedy special attackers include Gengar, Alakazam, and Zoroark, whereas good bulky ones include Chandelure, Reuniclus, and Mega Ampharos.

Mixed Attacker: This is the hardest category to get right, simply because pretty much any Pokémon - with the right EV split and Nature - could fit somewhat well into this category. A good mixed attacker won't have a nature that affects their stats or, if it does, it will be the Defenses or Speed simply due to a strategy. (For example, you could take Tyranitar's Sp. Def. down to boost Sp. Atk. on a Sandstorm team, since Rock Pokémon get a 50% Sp. Def. boost in Sandstorms. Or lower Speed on someone holding a Choice Scarf.) Alternatively, there could be a boost in the attacking stats, especially if one's lower, to help equalize them. This Pokémon also tends to be rather fast or rather bulky, so that the Trainer can build up both Attack and Sp. Atk. to relatively equal levels. Few Pokémon truly fit well in this role, however. Sandstorm-team Tyranitar, Lucario, and many legendary Pokémon can fit somewhat-well. The main problem with a mixed attacker is that you are sacrificing attacking prowess for flexibility, many times. For example, Tyranitar is largely better for physical attacking; however, Sandstorm team users tend to give him a mixed set since the Sandstorm team tends to be reliant on physical attackers, and some moves are more available in the Special class - such as Ice- or Fire-type moves - that you cannot easily get as a Physical user. You might not be able to hit as hard as with a fully-physical set (because logic dictates equaling the Attacks out: no point in using Ice Beam if your Special Attack is obscenely-low), but you at the same time are more able to counter threats. It can go either way - as I said, it's mostly reliant on the team you have.

Sweeping Attacker (a.k.a. "Sweeper"): A sweeper Pokémon will normally be a specialized subset of one of the above three categories. A general physical or special attacker may have one or two status moves to somehow aid the party; even if intended for attacking, they may have some other purpose in mind. For example, Mega Banette makes a great physical attacker, but with Prankster it can also be nice at trolling with Thunder Wave or other such moves or using Destiny Bond as a "take you down with me" move. Sweeper Pokémon are however definitively powerful, definitively fast, and definitively only intended to attack. Their primary goal is to be able to hit as many Pokémon super-effectively as possible. In turn, that must mean they have a varied movepool such that they can learn a huge variety of moves. Examples include Lucario (Aura Sphere, Flash Cannon, Dragon Pulse, Psychic), Dragonite (Dragon Claw, Thunder Punch, Ice Punch, Fire Punch), Protean Greninja (Scald/Surf/Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, Dark Pulse, Grass Knot/Hidden Power Fire), and many other Pokémon. No one Pokémon has ever been able to hit all Pokémon supereffectively, nor will any be able to: the goal is to get as close to that as possible. Most of these Pokémon will have a maxed offensive stat, maxed Speed, and Jolly/Adamant or Timid/Modest Natures, depending on their general stats and items. They will usually hold Expert Belts (+20% damage when super-effective) or Life Orbs (+30% damage, -10% HP per attack, particularly used on those with Sheer Force): this way, they can always switch moves rather than be forced into a single move like with Choice items. This enhances their ability to sweep by increasing their offensive output while at the same time keeping the flexibility.

Self-Buffing Attacker (a.k.a. Set-Up Sweeper): A good few Pokémon are able to play this role nicely. The key aspect of this is that the Pokémon is definitively bulky; for example, you give them a Nature and EVs to equalize or max out their Defenses and HP rather than their Attacking stats for one key reason. (You can also go for boosting Attack and Speed like normal if you prefer, it's really up to you.) The other possibile use for this set is that the Pokémon is able to switch into a situation that is tough for the opponent, allowing you to capitalize on a predicted switch out with a boost. (For example, you send out Talonflame against a Breloom, giving you a huge advantage and a likely one-hit kill. Instead of attack, you could use Swords Dance, or even Tailwind or Will-O-Wisp to boost not yourself but general help yourself and then wait and see what the foe brings out, in case you end up in a different situation that is bad for you.) That reason is that the Pokémon is intended to bulk themselves up using one of several moves; Swords Dance is common for physical attackers (Attack +2 stages), and Nasty Plot for specials (Sp. Atk. +2 stages). Dragon Dannce (+1 Attack, +1 Speed) is also very good since it boosts both Attack and Speed, though these Pokémon generally have to get in several uses or train in Attack and Speed to maximize its viability; only Dragonite with Multiscale and some other helpful item can really pull it off with DD. Due to the Pokémon being bulky or capitalizing on the switch, they get a free boost which can be helpful in the long term if the Pokémon lives beyond this turn. I've swept whole teams with 2-Dragon Dance Dragonite, for example. Sadly, the moveset for these is relatively restrictive. There's your buffing move, a powerful STAB move, and a priority move in general (so you can still generally attack even though you're clearly slower). Having Protect or the like in combination with Leftovers can help out; alternate between moves and Protect to restore 12.5% of your HP every two turns, although that can be predictable and lead the opponent to their own buffing or switching to more advantageous Pokémon, so take that as you will. A very common Pokémon for this role is Aegislash, simply because he can be both bulky and offensively devastating due to the way Stance Change works if you think about it right. Scizor also works well for this, and I like to use Darkrai for it after Dark Void. Mega-Kangaskhan with Power-Up Punch also is pretty common, since Parental Bond-boosted Power-Up Punch hits twice, and is thus an Attack +2 boost, which is very common on its moveset in X/Y. Further examples include Lucario, Talonflame, Mega Mawile, and Xerneas.

Kamikaze Attacker: In my eyes, a "kamikaze attacker" is a more advanced version of the "self-buffer", for their strategy is superficially suicidal: one wrong step can end up with a quick death. These Pokémon will rely on moves that highly buff them, such as Shell Smash (Attack, Special Attack, Speed +2 stages; Defense, Special Defense -2 stages) - in fact, Shell Smashers are the most common variety of this Pokémon. Dragon Dancers also work, but the important characteristic is the boosting of Speed. This Pokémon will always have either Sturdy or a Focus Sash so as to ensure their survival; if they are Sturdy, then they may hold a basic item that boosts their own output without drawback, such as the Plates, or perhaps rely on the Weakness Policy's own boosts, even if it is not necessarily true that you'll be hit super-effectively. They will wisely be trained in an offensive stat and their Speed - regardless of their real Speed - as they will likely have it boosted to the point that even a low base Speed is faster than most Pokémon. A priority attack, if at all possible, would be invaluable. Their strategy works like such: boost every turn until death is relatively assured. This commonly occurs after a super-effective hit triggers the Sturdy-and-Weakness Policy or Focus Sash. Their boosting each turn is used not only to boost their offensive output, but their Speed; thus, when they attack, they will attempt to hit first and hit hard. However, in this weakened state, they will also be vulnerable to even a weak priority attack, which is why a priority attack of your own is very important to fully utilizing this set-up. The main counters to these kinds of Pokémon are indeed priority attackers or Trick Room teams. Mold Breaker Pokémon can also defy Sturdy-reliant Pokémon, and multi-hit moves (i.e. Mega-Kangaskhan with Parental Bond) are able to wipe out Sturdy and Focus Sash if strong enough.

Counterattacker: A very rare role, this role is mostly delegated to Singles or 1v1 play. The main purpose of this Pokémon is to simply counterattack anything that comes; by knowing the opposing Pokémon, if you assume the opponent knows basic Pokémon strategy, you can assume their next move class used. For example, Blaziken is a good physical attacker; he'll likely use a physical move. This counterattacker will then counter that move, typically with Counter, and OHKO it due to high damage returned. Few Pokémon fit this role barring Swampert (Counter/Mirror Coat) and Aggron (Metal Burst/Sturdy), though. The Pokémon will need to be quite bulky, and generally wear a Focus Sash so they avoid being killed in one-hit if they're not already Sturdy. 

Damage Sponge (a.k.a. "Wall" or "Tank"): Damage sponges are also a rather rare role to find, but they can be quite useful, especially in Singles play since the proper use of a sponge is very much based on your prediction skills. A damage sponging Pokémon will have its Defense, Sp. Def., and HP brought as high as is naturally possible; the Assault Vest is an interesting aid to this, but it does prevent the use of status moves, a critical component of sponges since they tend to have pretty poor attacking movesets or stats. Other common aides are Leftovers, Black Sludges on Poison or Poison Heal Pokémon, or Eviolites on Pokémon not fully evolved. The general idea is this... Say your opponent has a Pokémon out that, for whatever reason, has a huge attacking advantage over you: for example, a fast Alakazam you already know to have Focus Blast is against your Tyranitar. That Focus Blast, if it hits, can easily be a OHKO. Thus, you would likely switch: a wise switch would be to a Special Damage Sponge, a Pokémon with high HP and Special Defense to essentially negate damage. Blissey is common in this instance. The moveset of the sponge is mostly dependent on the team, but it typically relies on status moves, like Blissey with Thunder Wave; when possible, the sponge also has a self-healing move, such as Moonlight, Softboiled, Synthesis, and Milk Drink, among others, which helps to turn it also into a PP sponge against the enemy to slowly limit down their moveset.

Revenge Killer: This Pokémon is almost never brought out as a lead Pokémon, and always has a priority attacking move. Personally, I'd also suggest Pursuit, for reasons to be named soon. See, this Pokémon's role is to kill off any foe that you've been grinding against, but it killed you; the foe probably has low HP now, and killing it would be a good idea. Thus, you bring in a Pokémon and hit the opponent with a priority attack; this generally lets you attack first and kill the foe, and they generally won't switch because that'd be pointless damage to the one switching in. (The exception is if you use a move that won't affect some Pokémon, like how Quick Attack or Extreme Speed won't hurt Ghosts. People could assume you'll use one of these, or just use a Protect-like move to scout for the revenge-killing technique and then switch. That's why I'd also recommend Pursuit, for if the switch could be easily predicted, and you're faster than the opponent presumably, then you'll go first either way, but Pursuit allows you to kill a switching-out Pokémon in this case.) All priority attacks are going to be physical (except Vacuum Wave), so good physical attackers work well for this role. They generally won't want to be underpowered, so Choice Bands or Life Orbs are also common, or Focus Sashes on the flimsier of these. Good Pokémon for this role include Scizor with Bullet Punch, Gale Wings Talonflame with Brave Bird or a Flying Gem Acrobatics, Aegislash with Shadow Sneak, and Dragonite with Extreme Speed. The reason I recommend these in particular are because these Pokémon can also set off as a physical-attacker role after the revenge-kill, as they're good attackers in themselves that will be able to survive for longer than this one, niche purpose: that would be the key aspect of any revenge-killer.

U-turner/Volt Switcher (a.k.a. the "Volturn" strategy): This is moreso a duet or triplet of Pokémon using the moves U-turn and Volt Switch to get their way with you. See, these moves deal damage, and then the user switches out. A wise player would try to predict the opponent's next move and then send out a Pokémon that will resist that move. For example, the battle is currently in a Trick Room with my Scizor versus Talonflame. Due to Trick Room, my (crappy) U-turn goes first and does minor damage. Scizor switches out and I send, oh, Houndoom, who happens to have Flash Fire. Houndoom is hit with Flare Blitz, his damage is negated, and his power boosted. I then Mega-Evolve and use a high-powered Overheat and could OHKO that Talonflame. Or I could send out Rotom-Wash and Thunderbolt him (or Hydro Pump, but it's less accurate)... You see? The only way to counter this tactic is to out-predict the opposing Trainer, or to run them out of PP.

Status Crippler/Status Troll: This Pokémon will almost always rely on the Prankster ability to get their job done: common examples include Sableye, Klefki, and female Meowstic. Why? This lets a variety of status moves go first, which are mostly used to cripple the opponent. Will-O-Wisp is common as a counter to physical attackers as is Swagger (followed by Foul Play); Thunder Wave can simply stop a fast offense; Quick Guard became common in the X/Y metagame due to Talonflame's overuse; Flatter can counter Special Attackers; and there's even Taunt or Safeguard to work against the Pokémon using this same strategy. Those working on this strategy will often hold Leftovers or Focus Sash to increase lifespan. EV splits tend to vary, but focus on bulk. Personally, it is best to give these Pokémon maxed Speed for sure: while they won't be attacking in most instances, it allows them to go first. Status Cripplers are particularly vulnerable to Taunt, so being able to stop someone from using Taunt on you, or at least getting that one move in before they do Taunt you. Typical counters to the Taunt vulnerability are Taunting the Taunter, Safeguard, and Magic Coat.

Status Supporter: Support Pokémon will mostly take their precedence in Double or Triple Battles in this game, mostly since they aid an ally immediately and make their slot less wasted. These Pokémon also tend to be Pranksters, just like cripplers, though Klefki and female Meowstic are far more favored than Sableye; in those, those two in particular are good for running mixed-status sets. They, too, will be bulky, as usual. In this instance, they mostly support the party by boosting the party's stats in some way or otherwise protecting them. Light Screen and Reflect are very common, as could be stuff like Quick Guard and Wide Guard. (The former's mostly used as a Talonflame counter in the X/Y meta.) Helping Hand is also particularly nasty for Supporters to have since it boosts the power of the target's move by 50% and it always goes before any offensive move. Support Pokémon don't focus on much else but boosting the party, and while that seems like a waste, keep in mind that Light Screen and Reflect together halve all damage for five turns. That's effectively doubling the life of your party. Helping Hand is like a Choice item power boost without the Choice item restrictions - and a 2.25x power boost with it! Never neglect a supporter - in fact, they should be your first target if you spot them.

Baton Passer: A Baton Passing Pokémon is sort of a specialized version of the Supporter Pokémon, and is typically used in Single Battles since it's easier to manage. A Baton Passing strategy relies on the core fact that Baton Pass will pass stat changes from the user to the Pokémon brought in by Baton Pass. For example, if I use Swords Dance twice, then use Baton Pass to bring in Blaziken, it will be as if Blaziken had used Swords Dance twice. This can be significant in transferring stat boosts to Pokémon that don't have the ability to use the moves to boost those stats or don't have them in their moveset (such as Blaziken with Swords Dance), or for giving the boosts to Pokémon too frail to be a true set-up sweeper (such as Talonflame, Alakzam, Gengar, and Greninja). How does the Baton Passing strategy work? Firstly, you will often lead with the Baton Passer. Most Baton Passers will be trained for Defense and Special Defense and HP, often hold Focus Sashes if not Sturdy, and must have a way to boost stats (ability or move) and must know Baton Pass. Most Baton Passing Pokémon will use Protect first (usually only if they know Speed Boost, common on Ninjask and Scolipede Baton Passers), then the boosting move, and alternate until they think the next move (or the move after next, depending on the foe's Speed) will kill them, which means next up comes the Baton Pass itself. The main counter for this strategy would be a priority-attacking Pokémon: since Baton Pass is not given priority, nor can any Prankster Pokémon learn it, you can get in the priority attack before the Baton Pass occurs, since most people wait for the "I'm about to die" moment (like when the Focus Sash activates) before using Baton Pass. And, if you have priority versus no priority, you win this bit. The most common Baton Passing Pokémon are Scolipede and Ninjask, who can also use their Speed Boost abilities to transfer a Speed increment in addition to Swords Dance and perhaps some other boosting moves like Iron Defense or Hone Claws (for accuracy); some Blazikens will also use this strategy, though infrequently. The best counters for this tactic are just about any priority attacker you can think of that has decent power, such as Talonflame with Gale Wings Brave Bird or Banette/Mega-Banette with Shadow Sneak. Taunt users - Prankster Sableye and Gengar/Mega-Gengar are common for this - also work very well.

Hazard Maker: These Pokémon tend to set up entry hazards; since you and your opponent see each other's teams before the battle, it's easy to see what works well. Stealth Rock absolutely murders people with Charizard, and there's also Toxic Spikes, for example, to continue piling on the damage. This role is usually dedicated to something rather bulky, such as Skarmory or Ferrothorn, and is relatively rare, except in Singles play. Your best bet to counter them is to know that they'll lead with this Pokémon. =P In any case, these Pokémon focus on bulk, but it'd take an idiot to leave the Pokémon without an attacking move of some sort, just to do something after the hazards are set. Skarmory commonly has Brave Bird or Steel Wing, and Ferrothorn often has Gyro Ball or Power Whip, for example. A different way to counter hazard setters is to actually use these turns to set-up: use several Swords Dances or something, for example, to really power-up your damage output. However, a lot of hazards can be set in by that point, so if you plan to counter it this way, be sure to have someone with Rapid Spin or Defog on your team, preferably the latter as it also lowers Evasion by one stage and removes barriers like Light Screen and Reflect.

Weather(-Like) Setter: Similar to a Hazard Maker, this Pokémon will mostly be there to set up a weather or weather-like condition. These are most often used on weather teams or Trick Room teams, and will have the move to set up the weather or the ability; if they use a move, people like use Pokémon with the Prankster ability if possible to still make the effects of the weather apparent quickly or to override someone else's weather, like with Prankster Whimsicott and Sunny Day. These Pokémon will typically intend to attack if they set up a real weather condition, and thus tend to favor the role of a Physical/Special/Mixed Attacker beyond this role. Trick Room setters are the exception, since they must use a move, and thus tend to be bulky to survive until the move is used. Commonly used Pokémon include Mega Charizard-Y (Sunny), Ninetales (Sunny), Politoed (Rainy), Tyranitar (Sandstorm), Hippowdon (Sandstorm), Abomasnow (Hailing), Slowking (Trick Room), Mega Slowbro (Trick Room), Reuniclus (Trick Room), Cofagrigus (Trick Room), and Aromatisse (Trick Room). Being able to counter these Pokémon will be essential to your team!! You need to recognize your opponent will be using a Weather team, and must send out a Pokémon, often on the first turn (since they tend to set up weather ASAP), to immediately get rid of the weather setter. Granted, the weather will usually be already-set via ability (barring Trick Room, which is often countered through Taunt, forced-exit moves like Roar, or outright KO's), but notice how a good chunk of those Pokémon are by definition able to abuse their own weather condition and/or Mega-Evolve. Mega-Charizard-Y using Fire Blast, Overheat, or Blast Burn in Sunny weather is no joke: it's by definition more than double damage (STAB = x1.5, Sunny = x1.5) before type effectiveness is accounted for; Blast Burn would be a whopping 337.5 base power. They can often be the strongest Pokémon on the team as a result of this stuff: don't let them get by! Their main flaw - at least in the way-overused ones - are double-weaknesses, such as Charizard Y's double-weakness to Rock, Tyranitar's to Fighting, and Abomasnow's to Fire. That's not to say that the strategies are themselves flawed. For example, your foe could set up Light Screen or Reflect to cut damage against you (it literally CAN save you from a KO, even despite a double-weakness) or use Tailwind to force them to go first with an overpowered move (like how Mega Charizard Y could use Solar Beam against Mega Tyranitar) that could induce the KO.

Gimmick: Several Pokémon in the game are simply attuned to gimmicky strategies that don't have much chance to work in theory, but will possibly work in practice and in niche situations. Some people tend to use them in the instance that they end up with one or more slots have nothing good for them, depending on the team-wide tactic, and thus they feel they may as well try something that is insanely difficult to counter in certain niche situations. Here are several examples:
  • F.E.A.R.: The most dreaded of the gimmick strategies, it is rarely used outside of Single Battles and will absolutely devastate a team that is unable to status the F.E.A.R. Pokémon, or even hit multiple times or abuse Mold Breaker (or similar abilities) in some cases. The most common Pokémon for this is Aron with Sturdy and a Shell Bell. This Aron needs to know Endeavor and be Level 1. Due to being Level 1, he will likely move last on the first turn, using Endeavor last. Due to low Defenses, he'll likely be at 1 HP and reduce his opponent to that level. Due to the damage dealt, Shell Bell refills his HP to full again. Then the Pokémon dies when the Aron attacks via some means. (Pokémon other than Aron will favor Quick Attack or the like: a priority move, essentially, to move first.) Sandstorm also helps that out.
  • Transform: Personally, I don't think this is a big gimmick, but, hey, whatever. Transform is a move whose details can be viewed by clicking the nearby link: essentially, you can use it to copy a Pokémon, even your allying Pokémon in a Double/Triple/Multi Battle. This allows you to view the opposing movesets and all that jazz; this strategies' uses can vary depending on the situation. Personally, I like to copy Pokémon who have been buffed up so I copy their buffs. Pokémon that fit this role typically are Ditto, Smeargle, and Mew, each with a Focus Sash. The main reason this may not work is because people can have counters to the Transformer on their team, and it's very terrible to use without Imposter (because then you just have Ditto or Smeargle (in VGC-like play), both of which are flimsy and easy to beat). The self-countering aspect is never considered in most Pokémon teams, but most Pokémon have a way to beat themselves or the allies on their team by pure coincidence. For example, on one of my old X/Y teams -- Kangaskhan beats Aegislash (Earthquake) who beats Greninja (Sacred Sword) who beats Dragonite (Ice Beam) who beats Talonflame (Thunder Punch) who beats Lucario (Flare Blitz) who beats Kangaskhan (Focus Blast/Close Combat). And, yet, I never intended that to happen!
  • Power Trick Shuckle: Shuckle has the highest Defense and Special Defense of all Pokémon in the game, a base of 230 in each, making it exceed well over 500 with the right nature/EVs/IVs. He is a friggin' tank. And then Power Trick swaps Attack and Defense, making Shuckle stronger than any other unboosted Pokémon. It can work well with the right strategy, although there is no strategy will really work out with this except in niche situations. (The main counter I always found was Talonflame - I tried a Doubles strategy where my ally was Greninja, who used Mat Block to help out. Shuckle Power Tricks on Turn 1 while Mat Block occurs. Shuckle Protects, Greninja attacks. Shuckle Attacks and Greninja Mat Blocks. A priority attacker will win this fight since Talonflame can OHKO Greninja in most situations.) Why? Because Shuckle's Defense will become a base of TEN. We're talking weakest in the game. It can work against a Special Attacking team (that lacks Psyshock), or on a physical team when Wonder Room is used, I'll grant you that, but most people aren't going to fall for this and will be able to counter it.
  • Sturdy Shedinja: The strategy of the Sturdy Shedinja is itself insanely overpowered: if someome can get it up, it's a slow, painful defeat for their opponent. Sturdy Shedinja relies on the fact that OHKO'ing moves will result in the wielder of Strudy having 1 HP - and since Shedinja always has 1 HP, it will always keep that 1 HP! To set it up, it usually must be a Double or Triple Battle, and you often have to use Worry Seed on Shedinja to give it the ability Insomnia, then on the same turn have a Pokémon slower than the Worry Seed one use Skill Swap on Shedinja to swap Sturdy and Insomnia. (The Pokémon with Sturdy and Skill Swap should already have been given it via Entrainment or Skill Swap on a prior turn.) The main reason this is a gimmick? For the main reason that there are tons of ways to still kill the Sturdy Shedinja. These include Poison, Burn, Confusion, entry hazards, Mold Breaker attacks, Teravolt attacks, Turboblaze attacks, the use of Gastro Acid to negate Sturdy, Entrainment or Skill Swap from an opposing Pokémon onto Shedinja to get rid of Sturdy, Hailing weather, Sandstorm weather, Shedinja hitting a Pokémon physically that wields Rocky Helmet, Rough Skin, or Iron Barbs... The list goes on: that's the short list! Not to mention that all of the Pokémon involved would have to avoid getting Taunted or KO'ed.
  • No Guard + Sheer Cold: As you know, Sheer Cold is the best of the OHKO moves as it is not affected by Pokémon immunities: even though it is a 30% hit rate in most instances, it nonetheless will be able to hit every Pokémon. And you probably also know that the ability No Guard has the ability to make any move 100% accurate from the wielder. Sheer Cold and other OHKO moves are affected by this, creating a great possible abuse: instanteous OHKO moves with 100% accuracy. This is very hard to set-up in many instances, however: it would require quite a bit of luck in Doubles, and about as much in Triples even though it is manageable in the latter. I'll discuss it like that. In Triples, you will have the Sheer Cold Pokémon, a mediatory Pokémon with Skill Swap, and the No Guard Pokémon: for the sake of simplicity, they will be Walrein, Alakazam, and Machamp respectively. Walrein will usually run Scarf, Alakazam Focus Sash, and Machamp ... something. Alakazam Skill Swaps with Machamp on Turn 1, and then with Walrein on Turn 2. Boom: No Guard Sheer Cold. However, the reliance on that central Pokémon is the main flaw to this strategy: if they or the No Guard Pokémon are killed, everything is shot. If the Sheer Cold Pokémon is too slow, they will be easy to kill off despite the Sheer Cold. Plus, there is the general flaw with Taunt. No Guard + Sheer Cold is no doubt a formidable strategy, but it is moreso reliant on luck than anything. It would be highly effective in Single Battles, too, but it is impossible to set up in such a situation, and Double and Triple Battles dilute its effectiveness since those rely on the cooperation on the team of Pokémon, not the abuse of one.




Choosing Your Hold Items


Barring specialized competitions or those that attempt to emulate the Pokémon Red/Blue metagame, any of your Pokémon will be able to hold some kind of item. For most official competitions and certain areas in the game itself, you usually cannot have duplicate items or Soul Dew, but beyond those there's no limitations for you. There are hundreds of items you can hold, too, making your choice of item very very very critical to your Pokémon's strategy as a whole.  And of course, there's also Mega Stones that Mega-Evolve the Pokémon holding them and they cannot be taken away by any means: note that, since you can only have one Mega Evolution per battle, you need to be careful what you do.

Here's a general overview of the items you can hold (well, should - some are completely stupid) and why. This assumes general official competition rules, by the way: that means those only working on legendary Pokémon aren't here and neither is the Soul Dew, but most others were at least looked at. As with everything else in this section, this is simply a personal evaluation, and I'm open to external notes, but keep in mind that this section is primarily aimed at generalities rather than specific strategies.


Assault Vest: The Assault Vest boosts Special Defense by 50%, but prevents the Pokémon from using status moves: obviously, then, the Pokémon should be a dedicated sweeper of either Special or Physical orientation. I commonly find this item useful on Sandstorm teams. Most of the Pokémon compatible with Sandstorm's Sp. Def. boost of 50% still won't have a lot of Special Defense after that initial boost (even if EVs are accounted for): Rhyperior and Gigalith come to mind for this. This allows that boost to be further compounded to 2.25x the norm, which can exceed even their rather high Defenses, making them very bulky, though with the aforementioned examples you still need to be wary of those double-weaknesses and the like. This can also be used on Pokémon whose weaknesses are often Special-classed: for example, Dragonite with Multiscale will only take normal damage from Ice Beam (halved from Assault Vest, then halved from Multiscale), which gives you time to take out the user of Ice Beam. Other uses of it are to create Special walls out of Pokémon, mostly for Single Battles: Dragalge with Adaptability works well both as wall and attacker because of this.

Berries: For the most part, there are only two types of Berries uses, unless you count the use of Natural Gift. First are Sitrus Berries, which can be used to heal 1/4 of your HP when you get below 50% HP: I've seen this most often with very bulky Pokémon or those that used Belly Drum to help insure their survival. The other Berries used are those that halve the damage from particular super-effective attacks, like how the Occa Berry halves damage from super-effective Fire moves. The latter are used most often with bulky Pokémon with a niche, common double-weakness: for example, Scizor and Escavalier (Bug/Steel) are weak to only Fire, and it's a double-weakness, meaning that without an Occa Berry they are often OHKO'd with a Fire move. As another example, Dragonite, Salamence, and Garchomp are double-weak to Ice, so some people tend to make them hold Yache Berries as a counter. In most cases involving decent Pokémon that aren't very flimsy, they'll survive one such attack, if just barely, so you might manage. I will add, as a footnote, I've seen Lum Berries and Chesto Berries used to remedy statuses (Chesto Berries to use Rest and immediately reawaken, Lum Berries for generalities), though it's not nearly as common as those instances.

Black Sludge: This can be useful on Poison Pokémon: it works like Leftovers, but this thing is not usually beneficial for someone to Trick away from you since it only helps Poison Pokémon or those with the Poison Heal ability. Like Leftovers, it's better left for bulky Pokémon, and perhaps those that can compound its effects with Protect.

Choice Band/Specs: The Choice Band and Specs are items that make the Pokémon use only one move (until they switch out or lose the item), but their Attack or Sp. Atk., respectively, will be boosted by a whopping 50%. Pokémon with Choice Bands and Choice Specs are often Pokémon with naturally high stats so as to turn them into complete nukes: additionally, they're often also of a decent Speed so that they don't end up dying just because they go last. They also tend to be sweepers since, once they're out, they're often forced into using a specific move: thus, the initial flexibility will be key to the battle. Choice items grow more useful as more Pokémon get into the battle. For example, say in a Single Battle your Choice Band Dragonite uses Dragon Claw. If the opponent brings out Sylveon (a Fairy Pokémon), you'll be forced to switch. In Double and Triple Battles, however, it is much less likely that you'll have to deal with such situations: you may not always be able to hit supereffectively, but you might be able to work things to your advantage, though you are also crutching on the fact that you want the Choice Pokémon to do at least neutral damage barring a few circumstances.

Choice Scarf: The Choice Scarf is like the above two items, but this boosts Speed by 50%. This is used by Pokémon with decent Speed that you want to end up moving first whose power is already more than sufficient. Common Pokémon I've seen for this role are Garchomp, Mamoswine, Landorus, Gengar, and Terrakion: all Pokémon who are decently powerful without additional boosts, so the Speed boost is nice. The only problem is like with the other items: you can only use one move and can thus be forced into unideal situations. Furthermore, to skilled players, it'll also be noticeable when it's used since they'll be able to compare the natural Speed of their Pokémon with that of the one with the Scarf and see "Wait, that Pokémon's not normally faster than mine ... something's up...".

Eject Button: This item is not used too often, but it can be useful. What this item does is, when the holder is attacked, they are immediately switched out, although it's just that one time. It can be a useful way of arranging it so that you will be able to reactivate Ability-based weather should it fail, for example, or you can use it to easily pile on Intimidates or other such abilities.

Eviolite: Eviolite tends to fall out of use as most people will tend to use fully-evolved Pokémon for most competitions: it boosts the Defense and Special Defense of non-fully-evolved Pokémon (Mega-Evolutions don't count) by 50% each. If used at all, it is typically used by Pokémon that gained a new evolution with Diamond/Pearl in 2007 since they were already decently powerful and bulky to begin with: maybe not as much as their later forms, but the Def./Sp. Def. boost can surpass that perhaps. Porygon2 is one of the more common users of this: it makes him quite bulky, and he already is a decent attacker. Chansey has grown in popularity as its Sp. Def. bulk will exceed Blissey's quite significantly with proper investment, making it an insane Special wall.

Expert Belt: The Expert Belt will boost the damage dealt by 20% for super-effective attacks. Thusly, it is very commonly used on fragile sweeper Pokémon that, while wanting a power boost, are too frail to be able to use the Life Orb effectively. It is very common on sweeper Pokémon since they are inherently designed to hit multiple Pokémon types supereffectively, although I can see people crutching on this boost to make use of the boost every time in Double/Triple Battles, which makes their moves increasingly predictable. I've seen this most on Greninja since he's frail (thus, the Life Orb is usually not preferred: need all the HP you can get) and the Protean ability really allows a lot of boosting to occur since he will already get STAB every time.

Flame Orb: This will Burn the Pokémon holding it. Using it usually is not that good for you; however, there are two uses for it. First, if the Pokémon Burned has Guts, they will get a nasty power boost (and their lost Attack ignored); Facade also works similarly, though it's pointless if they lack Guts, and there's a similar use for Flare Boost (where the Burned Pokémon's Sp. Atk. doubles). The second primary use is for Trick and similar moves to Burn the target Pokémon, which is useful in pacifying physical-attacking Pokémon (that lack Guts). Some people also use it on Special-attacking Pokémon for the purposes of preventing them from being Poisoned, Paralyzed, or put to Sleep, though it's quite risky.

Focus Sash: The Focus Sash prevents the Pokémon from being killed in one hit from full HP, kinda like Sturdy, but it only has one use. This can be used on Pokémon that have a specific role to play in the battle that they must play (for example, setting Trick Room or entry hazards), which makes this item invaluable in Singles play since you'll almost never be hit more than once per turn in the competitive envionrment. In theory, I suppose fast Pokémon or slow ones in the midst of Trick Room could use it also to make Reversal and Flail do some nasty damage, and Endeavor from a weak, slow Pokémon can end up reducing the opponent to 1 HP easily this way if you lack Sturdy (a la the F.E.A.R. tactic). In general, people mostly apply this to Pokémon with a preset specific role, to Support Pokémon, or to Pokémon with naturally-low Defense or Sp. Def., all in the effort to lengthen their lifespan.

Iron Ball: This item by definition halves the holder's Speed and will also prevent them from Levitating or Flying. This can be well-used by ground-bound Pokémon so that they intentionally have low Speed: this has a few uses, such as going first in Trick Room, or empowering Gyro Ball. The latter is the more common instance, since the former is also doable by removing Trick Room and using a Choice Scarf or something: lower Speed with Gyro Ball is nasty. You can also Trick it onto Pokémon to slow them down and/or remove their Ground immunities, though that's not often. One final use is the move Fling: with that one-use move, it has a base 130 Power (the strongest possible Fling), and 195 if the user is Dark-type.

Leftovers: This is commonly used by bulky Pokémon so that their bulk is prolonged, making them survive longer and longer. It is even more effective when combined with things like Poison Heal while Poisoned, Aqua Ring, Rain Dish, Ingrain, and so on: the biggest boost is Leftovers, while Poisoned with Poison Heal, while Aqua Ring and Ingrain are active, healing 1/2 of their HP per turn. Just a fun fact. People also tend to use this as a "go-to" item when they have nothing better to put on their Pokémon, which is mostly an occurence with competitive standpoints where there is a "no-item-duplication" clause.

Life Orb: The Life Orb boosts all damage the user deals by 30%. For the most part, this is used by strong Pokémon that would actually not benefit from a Choice item. For example, those Pokémon who are designed for sweeping, or those who have to play a slight role in niche, sporadic situations (such as the use of Tailwind before dying, which is usually impossible with a Choice item, barring the first turn), or those you simply want to be able to sweep effectively throughout the whole battle. This is best used on Pokémon with the Sheer Force ability since, for some reason, that ability negates the 10% max HP lost due to Life Orb.

Light Ball: Pretty much the only thing that makes Pikachu worth using: it doubles its Attack and Special Attack. For the most part, Pikachu is still virtually unusable due to its lack of Speed and Defenses, but it can have as much as 459 Attack at Level 100 with max IVs, EVs, and a boosting Nature, when you account for this, which is admittedly pretty nasty. (It can be equated to a base Attack stat of about 159 ignoring boosts and assuming that the Light Ball is automatic. By comparison, Pikachu's base Attack otherwise is base 55.)

Metronome: Metronomes are not often used: in a way, it's like a Choice item, but the boost is not immediate, since you're forced to repeat the use of the same move to gain more power. Still, I've seen one notable instance of it: coupling Echoed Voice with Metronome compounds that repetition boost, able to overpower the Choice boost in only a couple of uses. I've seen this most often on Sylveon (a decent Special Attacker) since it can use its Pixilate ability to get STAB from it as well, and that Sylveon generally doesn't have a good fourth move when filling out its set. As you'll recall, both Metronome and Echoed Voice will escalate power with consecutive use in the order described below by "One Booster". The combined effect of the two is in "Both Boosters". With Normal Pokémon or Pixilate Sylveon, you can also throw in STAB, and with Pixilate Sylveon you also throw in the possibility of a singly- or doubly-effective move (1SE or 2SE, respectively, to keep it short). "Power" will refer to the resultant power of Echoed Voice, all these things accounted for, while the rest are simply multipliers to the base-40 power. This clearly shows how undervalued Metronome/Echoed Voice/Pixilate Sylveon is: of course, the problem will be keeping it alive long enough to get in 5+ uses, but that's something one will account for in their strategy. For example, the Rage Powder or Follow Me diversion tactics work extremely well for diverting the hits from Sylveon in Double or Triple Battles.

Iteration One Booster Power Both Boosters Power Both + STAB Power Both/STAB/1SE Power Both/STAB/2SE Power
Base x1.00 40 x1.00 40 x1.50 60 x3.00 120 x6.00 240
1st x1.20 48 x1.44 57.6 x2.16 86.4 x4.32 172.8 x8.64 345.6
2nd x1.40 56 x1.96 78.4 x2.94 117.6 x5.88 235.2 x11.76 470.4
3rd x1.60 64 x2.56 102.4 x3.84 153.6 x7.68 307.2 x15.36 614.4
4th x1.80 72 x3.24 129.4 x4.86 194.4 x9.72 398.8 x19.44 777.6
5th + x2.00 80 x4.00 160 x6.00 240 x12.00 480 x24.00 960

Power Herb: The intent of the Power Herb is to make it so that a two-turn move becomes one-turn. For the most part, this is useless since most two-turn moves can be surpassed or bypassed in some way (e.g. Dig with Earthquake, Solar Beam in Sunny weather), but one notable exception is the move Geomancy, which raises Special Attack, Special Defense, and Speed by 2 stages. At the same time, though, the only Pokémon that can use it are Xerneas and Smeargle, and the latter only because of Sketch, so don't expect to see this much in actual competition.

Ring Target: Simply put, this is just one of those items you'll want to Trick or otherwise put on your foes since it removes any immunities they have. Its uses are pretty niche, though, since all Pokémon have weaknesses, so it's better just to try to combat them all rather than waste an item slot on an item you only might use.

Rocky Helmet: The Rocky Helmet will hurt all contact attackers against the holder by making them lose 1/8 of their HP. This isn't used much, but when it is, it is commonly used by Pokémon that have Rough Skin or Iron Barbs to compound the effect, such as Ferrothorn or Garchomp.

Safety Goggles: Safety Goggles prevents the holder from being hurt by Sandstorm, Hail, and Powder moves, and the former two are the two instances you'll mostly see usage for this. For the most part, people don't use it, though it can work on Shedinja to prevent those instances from making him die virtually instantly. Particularly, I've seen people give Shedinja this in Hackmons when it's Sturdy to really make it hard to get rid of. (Of course, it can be made Sturdy through other means, but they're tedious and heavily based on luck.)

Specific-Type Gems: Note that the only Type Gym legitimately available in Pokémon games right now is the Normal Gem. There are a number of Gems you can get that will boost the power of a certain move type by 30%, but only for one use of that move. Gems are not used much anymore, but they still have some use - the main reason for their lack of use is that, while coded into the game, type Gems are simply not obtained during gameplay, other than the Normal Gem. There's also the fact that the power boost has been nerfed to +30% over +50% since their introduction. One of the most common combos, at least when they were still in use, is Flying Gem Acrobatics: the item is used before the move, which means Acrobatics will work as if there is no item on, giving it a base 110 (not 55) Power, which is boosted to 143 due to the Flying Gem. Although it's one-use, that Acrobatics is nasty and therefore works decently as a one-time physical nuke.

Specific-Type Items & Plates: There are a set of items that boost moves of certain types by 20%. There's Black Belt for Fighting, Charcoal for Fire, Miracle Water for Water, and so on. These are useful to an extent, but you'd be better off with a Life Orb or Expert Belt, so I tend to leave these items for last-ditch usage. You should pair these with the user's type to compound the boost onto STAB for 60% base extra damage.

Thick Club: This is like a Light Ball for Cubone and Marowak; however, Marowak is a more adept user of this since it can actually survive more than one hit. >_> It will double Cubone's and Marowak's Attack stat when held: if at max EVs and IVs, with a favorable Nature, at Level 100, that's a whopping 569 Attack. That's so high that it would actually cause glitches in Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal under those circumstances, making the Attack go to 8. The main problem with using these Pokémon is relatively low Special Defense (a seeming commonality among Ground and Rock Pokémon), but this is settled with EV manipulation: just don't expect it to survive a big Special super-effective attack, which can often happen since Marowak is pretty slow. Adept switching may be required, but this makes Marowak an immense threat nonetheless, especially on Trick Room teams.

Toxic Orb: Toxic Orbs are used to induce Bad Poisoning on the holder. You will see this often used to simply use Poison Heal (Gliscor is infamous for this), or to be used as one of those items you Trick onto others to troll them. Some Pokémon also try to use it for Guts (though Flame Orb is better in the long-term, Toxic does do slightly less damage in the first two turns than Burn), and Toxic Boost is a viable use of it, especially in combination with Facade. Nothing in-depth here, really, though I don't particularly recommend its use beyond those certain niches I mentioned. Some people also use it on Pokémon for the purposes of preventing them from being Burned, Paralyzed, or put to Sleep, though it's quite risky.

Weakness Policy: The Weakness Policy is one of the most commonly used items as of its introduction: when hit with a super-effective attack, the wielder has their Attack and Sp. Atk. boosted by 2 stages each. That actually doubles their damage output assuming their stats weren't affected beforehand! The problem is ensuring that you survive the attack, since it has to be super-effective. This is therefore used by Pokémon that are both powerful and bulky such as Aegislash (Swords Dance with Shadow Sneak are particular nasty with this on). Other aides exist: for example, some people will stall with Multiscale Dragonite (with maxed Defense and Sp. Def. EVs) by using Dragon Dance until hit super-effectively, then Extreme Speed after ... or something like that. There's also Sturdy. The point is to assure that you live through the strike, and then make them regret it. 

Weather Rocks: The Smooth, Heat, Damp, and Icy Rocks are used to lengthen the duration of Sandstorm, Sunny, Rainy, and Hailing weather, respectively, by three turns. You can see these on weather teams, but at the same time I tend to see them as a "I have no better item" item: most battles should already be done within the space of the five turns in which the weather lasts, so the relevance is little.



In-Battle Prediction



In a Pokémon battle, much of your success will rely on your ability to predict and understand what your foe is going to do and why. Much of this can only be honed through a thorough amount of practice and knowledge about all Pokémon in the game: truly successful predictions are only manageable by world-class players, for there are very many things to take into account, including even your opponent's predictions! Simply playing thousands of battles or memorizing everything about every Pokémon in the game is just not enough to be able to predict what will happen: you need to have a great understanding of the higher-level of thinking that strategy itself takes. Knowledge is basic and predictable -- strategy is inherently variable and entropic; it is a whole new dimension.

This section will discuss two primary things: prediction when it comes to picking your Pokémon for the battle in the Team Preview, and then the actual execution of battles.

For the sake of argument, we will assume you and your opponent are using the following Single Battle teams. Practicing these skills in Single Battles is the best way to make that "step up" to the much more complex environs that Double, Triple, Rotation, and Multi Battles present. We will assume Flat Rules for these teams: 3 Pokémon per team, limited to Level 50, with no duplicated items or species. To further emphasize what's going on, no details are present on your foe's team, since you normally will not be able to perceive this info.


YOUR TEAM (leading with Charizard)
Pokémon Type Hold Item Ability Move 1 Move 2 Move 3 Move 4
Charizard Fire/Flying Charizardite X Blaze Flare Blitz Dragon Claw Earthquake Brick Break
Heracross Bug/Fighting Heracronite Guts Arm Thrust Bullet Seed Pin Missile Rock Blast
Aegislash Ghost/Steel Weakness Policy Stance Change Shadow Ball Shadow Sneak Sacred Sword King's Shield
FOE'S TEAM (leading with Bisharp)
Pokémon Type Hold Item Ability Move 1 Move 2 Move 3 Move 4
Bisharp Dark/Steel ? ? ? ? ? ?
Garchomp Dragon/Ground ? ? ? ? ? ?
Zapdos Electric/Flying ? ? ? ? ? ?

Choosing Your Team: In the above instance, we are already limited to the three Pokémon allowed by Flat Single Battles, so there's not much work needed in this situation. However, you will want to consider how well any of your chosen teams will be able to combat any and all of the Pokémon on your opponent's team: you don't necessarily want a Pokémon that has to be on your team, or your opponent will easily be able to spot that and immediately counter it. (A skilled predictor will be able to notice whether all of the synergy generated by a team is such as to aid one specific Pokémon, which designates it as "the one to kill". While you can use this knowledge as a bluff - think the 2014 VGCs World Championship match that popularized Pachirisu - don't expect it to work unless you actually know what the hell you're doing. A truly good team will have each Pokémon able to help each other such that there is no one necessary Pokémon: at the most, necessary combinations of Pokémon of which there are too many to pinpoint and make "the one to kill" decision.)

At the same time, if you have such a necessary Pokémon (such as with weather or Trick Room teams), include a Pokémon to counter that Pokémon that can counter yours. In other words, consider Mega Charizard Y for Sun teams; it's main weakness is Rock, so you'll want a Pokémon to counter Rock. Heatran is a good choice since it'll both benefit from MCY's Sun and can use its Steel moves to counteract the Rock. Don't stick with a set of concrete subteams from your team of six unless you have a good reason as to why (such as having two possible Mega Pokémon per team for variance): as I said earlier, you want to have a lot of intrateam synergy. Having concrete pairs, for example, in Doubles means you basically have three sub-teams; however, if your Pokémon are all synergetic with the others on the team, hard as that will be to make happen (it takes true skill and dedication and practice), it generates some 360 teams. See the difference? Before your opponent could opt to counteract any one such team and have a 2/3 shot at being able to sweep that subteam outright; heck, they could even be able to counter two of your subteams, screwing over half of your team outright for sure. (Again, VGC Doubles = 4 Pokémon per side.) But you can't easily pinpoint any one team out of 360 to wipe out, and there's the advantage.

But in general, in Team Preview, it's all about simply countering your opponent's team - regardless of whether you use subteams or not, countering your foe and recognizing his likely combos, if any, is the main focus - or countering your foe's counters to your team, whichever you use depending on your team's set-up. But you absolutely must also try to predict what Pokémon your foe will use: that kind of info will become increasingly useful in predicting your foe's own moves and actions to a level you'd be unable to believe (if you're a beginning competitor).

That also comes to another point: predicting the roles of a single Pokémon. Some Pokémon have obvious roles based on their common usage with the associated role: most people who play the OU metagame on Smogon, for example, will likely spot out Skarmory or Ferrothorn as a Pokémon who is used to set up entry hazards, but you won't necessarily know that without experience. Experience is its own benefit and can teach you more than anything. Once you realize what roles a Pokémon typically plays, you can figure out ways to counter them in the Team Preview. For example, consider this: you have a Sableye, with Prankster, knowing Taunt on your team. Your foe's team has a Skarmory on it, the archetypical entry hazard Pokémon. "Hey, entry hazards are status moves ... that means, if I use Taunt, I save myself a bunch of HP! And then I can abuse Swagger/Foul Play/Will-O-Wisp/whatever to tear apart that team!" It's only a prediction, but the fact that you know that entry hazard Pokémon are often the first out has just essentially won you part of that battle simply because Skarmory doesn't have the Attack to back up its counter to the Taunt, especially after Will-O-Wisp. This allows all manners of setting up in myriad ways ... just because you spotted out that Skarmory as a hazard setter.


When it comes to the actual battle, things begin to get complicated since you only have sixty seconds, plus battle scenes, to do all of your predicting and action choices, and many choices once finalized are irrevocable. Being both quick and accurate is of the utmost importance when it comes to the mental part of gameplay. The below are what I personally define as the three levels of prediction in the Pokémon games, and it's all regarding what to do with your offensive Pokémon when their turn comes up. (Status Pokémon are simpler in that regard: that's the "common sense" stuff often enough.) 

... Again, recall we led with our Charizard against a Bisharp.


Level 0 Thinking: This is the level of thinking most people develop during the main storyline of the Pokémon games: it is a "What I want to do" thinking and is very superficial. This kind of thinking does not care for the many counters your move would have: you simply are caring about meeting the immediate goal. In this case, a Level 0 thought would be Brick Break (to capitalize on the quadruple Fighting weakness on Bisharp) by your Charizard while Mega-Evolving.

Level 1 Thinking: This level of thinking is more common amongst people in the Battle Spot or PSS in this game: not particularly skilled players, but those definitely knowing more than the average player. Level 1 thinking consists of the counter to the opponent's own counter. With this level of thinking, we must begin to assume on what your opponent will do. In this instance -- his Bisharp versus your Charizard -- he could easily assume he's at a great disadvantage. Even if he doesn't know you have Brick Break, almost 90% of Charizards Mega-Evolve, about half into Mega-X and half into Mega-Y: you could capitalize on Tough Claws-boosted Flare Blitz or Sun-boosted Fire Blast, and both will one-hit-kill him. After all, logic dictates having a STAB move. (Remember, your foe in this instance is likely to have a Chople Berry to lessen the weakness to Fighting, or much more likely a Focus Sash to lessen all weaknesses by removing the chance for a OHKO.)

So, now, how is your opponent, at a great disadvantage he cannot accurately predict, going to counter your Charizard? There are several ways. Firstly, he could have the Focus Sash and just decide "Eh" and use Swords Dance this turn and Sucker Punch on the next: there's no guarantee of a KO that way, however. Plus, he could just take Zapdos and switch it in if he believes you'll use Brick Break and leave the vaguity of the item for another day by halving damage; however, he'll likely stick with the focus on you using a Fire move since about half of Charizards are Special and thus will not have Brick Break, so that can't be what he's thinking.... Zapdos has no advantage there. Your opponent will likely choose Garchomp, then! Garchomp will resist any Fire move thrown at him, so he's fine in that regard: plus, the assumed Mega Charizard X would even lose a nice chunk of HP (Flare Blitz or Brick Break) since your foe's team is not Sand and thus Garchomp likely has Rough Skin. Additionally, Garchomp is faster than Mega Charizard X, especially when the Choice Scarf ("ScarfChomp") is very common on it.

Now you've learned your opponent's thinking process, and hopefully deducted it faster than it took for me to write it out. You know now that your opponent likely ("likely" is the key word in all predictions: your opponent could outpredict you or be an idiot, you never know) plans to switch in Garchomp to avoid any loss of his Bisharp; on the next turn, he'll likely choose to use Outrage, Dragon Claw, Rock Slide, Stone Edge, or Earthquake to get in some kind of supereffective hit. (Again, you don't know what he has, but these are all very common on Single Battle Garchomps: these kinds of things can only be derived through experience and logic.) Your counter to the switch is the essence of a "Level 1" thought! There are two ways in particular to go about this. One is to have Mega Charizard X opt to use Dragon Claw. WRONG! Remember, you also don't know exactly what team your foe has: he could have Garchomp or might not, however likely it might be; he might keep in Bisharp and thus halve the damage, or he may even outpredict you with a "Level 2" thought. The wisest choice would be Aegislash. While Aegislash is indeed weak to Ground, a bulky Aegislash with maxed Defense/Sp. Def. EVs/IVs and a Quiet Nature (he's a Special Attacker optimizing his use of King's Shield in this instance) will survive and also counter this Earthquake in the same turn with a Shadow Ball at now-doubled Special Attack. Which will hurt a lot, and maybe even guarantee the OHKO. If not, Shadow Sneak is there for that reason. (It has +1 Priority.) Even if he kept in his Bisharp, Aegislash is bulky enough to manage more than well enough, but it's clear he'd switch to Garchomp anyways, if he is thinking logically.

Level 2 Thinking: This level of thinking is most common among those participating in the VGCs and particularly those above the regional level. This can be considered as the "getting in your head" level of thinking (since you have to think as your foe would - Level 1 thinking is simply based on logic (i.e. it would be logical to use Brick Break on Bisharp)) and it, while also possibly resulting in lower success due to the multiple variables, the successes that get through will be overpoweringly effective. This is also the highest level of thinking one can manage before overthinking begins to sap both your time and effectiveness of thinking against a lower-predicting opponent (i.e. "overthinking") since there's only so much that one can predict on a limited set of info. This level of thinking consists of a "counter to the counter to the counter" thought. Again, let's use our Charizard-vs.-Bisharp example to exemplify this.

As established in the previous example, we have realized that the initial counter is a double switch to the situation of Aegislash-vs.-Garchomp that doesn't go as your foe thought it would. Now, you have to think as if you were in the shoes of your opponent and "What would I do, knowing this will be the outcome?" Since you're (as your foe) predicting the switch-in of Aegislash that could kill you (as your foe), you (as your foe) want to be able to assuredly one-hit-kill the Aegislash. Thus, in reality, sticking with Bisharp would actually be ideal. You (as your foe) would want to be able to counter Aegislash, since you (that is, again, your foe) are predicting that Charizard X could ultimately fall to a Swords Dance- and STAB-boosted Sucker Punch (3x damage) since a Chople Berry or Focus Sash could be in use, which they typically are on Pokémon with dual-weaknesses. You (again, as your foe) are therefore thinking the switch-in to your (as your foe) Garchomp would provide advantages over both Charizard X and Aegislash. And with the Aegislash ultimately triumphing, you (as your foe) would want Bisharp to remain in.

There, you have gotten into your opponent's head: you realize that, on the first turn of battle, they are actually going to keep in Bisharp to do something. Your foe is likely to lead with Swords Dance and then Sucker Punch whatever moron remains, be it Charizard or Aegislash, for the one-hit KO. You don't know for sure what item they hold, though that it could be a Chople Berry or a Focus Sash, meaning there's no guarantee of death even with a Flare Blitz (and then they could hold an Occa Berry to capitalize on the bluff, but the likelihood of that is exceedingly low). How do we counter this situation?

It would most easily be done with the biggest aberration from normal strategy in our team. Hopefully by now some of you have questioned as you why I have two Mega-Evolving Pokémon in "your" team. This all traces back to the stuff I spoke of back in the details about using Team Preview to your advantage. A good player would be able to predict whether a situation like this would pop up and, instead of using their already-established inflexible, concrete teams that most multi-Mega-Pokémon teams have, you included both in this battle. Whether your Charizard Mega-Evolves, even if statistics are in their favor (90%), is irrelevant to your opponent's strategy: Swords Dance-boosted Bisharp with Sucker Punch is more than able to kill Charizard or Mega Charizard X, it won't matter to him. Make a Mega-Evolution relevant then.

Thus, you have chosen to switch in your Heracross and Mega-Evolve it next turn. This will throw your opponent's ongoing strategy (as Swords Dance was just used) for a loop since not even a Swords Dance- and STAB-boosted Sucker Punch will make a dent in Mega-Heracross. You can also add to that that Arm Thrusts will have a base 90 Power (quad-weakness, STAB) each across the guaranteed 5 hits due to Mega-Heracross's Skill Link; since items activate only the moment when they're needed, this will virtually eliminate the problems of Chople Berries (activate only on hit one) or Focus Sash (only activate if there is a OHKO, and doesn't protect for hits beyond the causation).

Your opponent is now forced to switch somehow, but there's little point. Unbeknownst to you, you've outdone their entire team. Bisharp by the already-described means, Zapdos by five-hit Rock Blast (though switching is a better idea against him since Zapdos is often faster and could run Air Cutter or, crazily, Drill Peck), and Garchomp almost never has the Aerial Ace that would be the perfect counter to Heracross. (Most people use Dragon Claw/Outrage, Earthquake, Rock Slide/Stone Edge, and some coverage move, usually Poison Jab, Shadow Claw, or Brick Break.) Thus, you could just use the STAB-boosted Pin Missile against him and it might work out; Outrage might kill, but most are unwilling to use that since it traps you for a time.

Level 3+ Thinking: Now that you've established the best counter for your Charizard-vs.-Bisharp situation, which could've turned out far less well than you likely thought initially, it seems a switch-in to Heracross would be ideal. However, that's not necessarily the case since your opponent can further outpredict you and you further outpredict him. However, I usually wouldn't recommend anything beyond the already-described standards for a couple of reasons. Firstly, reactions and the resultant predictions are not by any means instantaneous: you have to think and think hard, using all of your logic and experience at your disposal, and the problem is that you have a limited span of time (one minute) to make them all. Adding multiple predictions is a way to force yourself to lose simply because you took too long. Additionally, with every extra level of prediction, you add in all the more room for flaws. Remember how we initially established your foe would likely switch to Garchomp while you switched to Aegislash? That doesn't have to be the case. Your opponent could over- or underpredict, and that will change the dynamics of everything; most people tend to make one or two levels of predictions to prevent too many flaws from coming into the formula. All prediction comes with the side-risk of failure, and as you layer it on, it gets increasingly risky. That's not to say you shouldn't try to even further outpredict your opponent - indeed, as you practice this, you'll learn to get into your foe's shoes and learn at what "level" he is thinking, and then in turn adequately match your own level of thinking against his so you can win out - but this can regress into an infinite series where no move is made simply because you counter the other infinitely. (It's possible.) Stick with what you can manage in 60 seconds and what is most likely - that's what all this is based on, "most likely" - to occur and you will manage well enough.



Overview of Themed Teams



There are a number of ways to have a team that runs along a common theme. Weather teams are the most common, but there are other types of teams, including those based on simple types, Trick Room, and abilities. Below are analyses of the common themed teams; if you feel others are worth mentioning, feel free to throw them along!

Keep in mind these were mostly written from the VGC metagame as compared to the real one: for example, that's why I stick to mentioning Politoed in the Rain teams. This helps get people into the competitive mindset and, more importantly, you can't even use most legendary Pokémon on Battle Spot and the like, so...

Weather Team - Rainy: Particularly in the competitive Pokémon Black/White meta, Rain teams became very common. Rain teams, like all weather teams, tend to rely on a Pokémon that has Drizzle to automatically set up Rainy weather: Politoed is the only viable choice in VGC-approved formats. Kyogre is viable for Ubers-level battling, and Primal Kyogre brings more to that. Due to Politoed's "meh" stats and movepool, you'll pretty much want to take it as a given that, if Politoed is on the opposing team, it's a sure-shot Rain team.

What do Rain teams have? Firstly, they'll have multiple Pokémon that can use their abilities to abuse the weather condition. Kingdra is a common choice for its Swift Swim and STAB-boosted Dragon Pulse or Draco Meteor, which is coverage for Dragon Pokémon. An underused Pokémon that is actually quite essential would be Armaldo: Armaldo one of only a few non-Water Pokémon to get Swift Swim, and that will allow him some powerful type coverage since he is already fast and powerful. He normally will cover Water's weaknesses in Grass (via X-Scissor) and Electric (via Earthquake). Ludicolo is a common choice for its Swift Swim as well and it can decently wall Specially, though it will mostly operate via Fake Out and Giga Drain.

Swift Swim is not the only viable Rain-boosted tactic to use, though it is the most common. Rain Dish allows a Pokémon to get healed slightly in the Rain, though the Pokémon wielding this are usually not worth using to begin with. Hydration can work well in ailment prevention, but often these Pokémon can be spotted out for that outright (Rain-themed team, Hydration needs Rain ... people can connect the dots). Water Absorb works somewhat well on a Doubles/Triples Absorb-themed team. Dry Skin can work much like Rain Dish, but the problems with it lie in the problems that the same Pokémon gets when Sunny weather occurs.

Beyond these, there are two common move-type abuses: the fact that Thunder and Hurricane became 100% accurate in the rain! Dragonite is a common Pokémon to make abuse of these two, but it would be best to divvy those two moves up to suitable Pokémon. Aside from your essentials in Politoed and Armaldo, you can give Thunder to many Electric pokemon and Hurricane to some Flying Pokémon.

These facts alone give you the general balance one should aim for on a Rain team:


  • Politoed with Drizzle
  • Armaldo with Swift Swim
  • Electric Pokémon with Thunder
  • Flying Pokémon with Hurricane

A quick analysis on the Politoed. You'll want it to be the primary weather setter, but you'll also want at least one other Pokémon capable of using Rain Dance. While it will be the main one doing the set-up, it is possible for Rain to run out or for another weather condition to come into play: particularly in Doubles, you can have your ally Protect and then use Rain Dance to satisfy your needs. Most people fail to realize that a battle can last longer than five turns and will neglect this, which itself has altered the minds of the players in the Pokémon metagame to the point that they will not expect this - both from their own weather team ending it and for when weather ends naturally - allowing you to regain your advantages. Politoed however should be slow (Quiet Nature, 0 Speed IVs, 0 Speed EVs, but no Iron Ball) so you can also make sure you get outsped if countering a weather team: their weather will set, then yours if you are slower. Sand teams will mess with this a little.

Now, you have two other slots you can use. These slots can be considered wild-card slots, depending on the type coverage of Politoed, Armaldo, and the Thunder/Hurricane Pokémon. Ideally, they'll be the fastest Pokémon on your team that can cover the others in a number of ways, or perhaps they'll play a role of support. Whichever works. However, going on the point I ended the previous paragraph with, you'll want a physical Water Pokémon: if you find a Sand team, you are screwed in most cases as a Sand team will be able to bulk its way through most Water attacks. (You should always account for the possibility both Politoed and the alternate weather setter will die off.)

This typically means that your second Water Pokémon will be Mega Gyarados or Mega Swampert, and each have their advantages: one can abuse Moxie and then Mega Evolve, but is prone to Electric in the meantime, whereas Mega Swampert gets really fast but is always prone to Grass. Mega Sharpedo can be the most viable in my opinion since it can get a Speed Boost and then Mega Evolve to 1.5x Speed and abuse Strong Jaw's power. Carracosta can be an interesting and surprise-worthy choice if trained for Speed (Swift Swim, Jolly Nature, 252 Speed EVs, 31 Speed IVs = 358.6 Speed in the Rain, equivalent to a Pokémon of base 113 Speed with a Speed-boosting Nature), though you'll need to beware that Grass weakness.

Counters for a Rain team exist completely in the role of a Sun team. Aside from this, Rain teams themselves often counter Rain teams when running the predescribed set-up, so a Rain team can be a double-edged sword. Luckily, Rain teams don't have truly direct counters in terms of types of Pokémon due to the variety that should be implemented: you'll likely end up with no fewer than two and no more than three Water Pokémon on the same team. (While Rain does provide an additional 50% boost to Water damage that couples with STAB, you'll find that Monotyping has its own problems.)

Weather Team - Sunny: Sunny teams are a bit less used and less predictable than is a Rain team. Furthermore, they also have less room for additional abuse; Sunny teams will prefer to rely on the fact they get the 50% extra damage from Fire moves (125% total boost when combined with STAB) in the Sun and also relish lowering the effectiveness of their counters in Water Pokémon, a few in particular. For weather setting, you have two standard options. Ninetales is used if you prefer another Mega Pokémon to be used, but it doesn't have the attacking power to make it good for much but support. Mega Charizard Y can be hard to counter without a Specially-bulky Rock Pokémon, particularly because it can use Solar Beam, but it's more than possible to kill it via other means due to some physical frailty. Non-VGC teams will also find Groudon and Primal Groudon worth using.

For the most part, you'll want to end up using Mega Charizard Y; it is more than possible to run Ninetales if you know how to run effective support, but almost none of you will be bothering with that part of things anyways since Mega Charizard Y is pretty much one of the only Mega Pokémon that makes full advantage of Sunny weather. As with Rain, we do have some abilities you can find worth using on a Sunny team.


  • Chlorophyll works great to incorporate some Grass Pokémon at double-Speed to counter those pesky Rock/Ground Pokémon that'll be plaguing Mega Charizard Y; sadly, not a lot of good Pokémon exist that have it. Lilligant is common to bring some Special Attackers into the team, whereas Leafeon is much more common, has decent Attack and great Defense.

  • Solar Power allows the Pokémon to gain further power in their moves while losing some HP each turn: imagine a Life Orb. In fact, you may as well put a Life Orb on these Pokémon. Charizard is a common choice for this since he adds some type variety to the team, as is Heliolisk for much the same reason. If your setter is Ninetales, this will be the reason you'll use Mega Houndoom.

  • Flower Gift from Cherubi may be helpful, or look it, but it's only worth using with defensive Cherubi in a Triple Battle, given his frailty. Still, it can boost your attack somewhat.

So, what you'll generally end up with is:

  • Mega Charizard Y / Mega Houndoom
  • Ninetales with Drought / Charizard with Solar Power <-- both in the case of Mega Houndoom, none otherwise usually
  • Some other slots

What these remaining slots are used for is largely up to you; you have a lot more flexibility with this type of team than you do some of the others. These slots are best used for type coverage; Leafeon and other Chlorophyll Pokémon help to cover that pesky Rock weakness that'll plague your team as well as incidences of Rain and Sand teams that come in. Beyond these things, you pretty much have it all covered, a point after which you'll want to focus on covering all types. Heliolisk is capable of abusing its Solar Power to add the Electric coverage and some other types, but to each their own.

Finally, one final note on your team: this goes much in the same vein as it does with the other weather teams, that you should include multiple weather setters. I wouldn't use both Mega Charizard Y and Ninetales (that's too clear a giveaway - remember, Mega Charizard could go X or Y, so your ambiguity on the matter helps a lot). Rather, just teach some other Pokémon on your team Sunny Day for the obvious reason of reintroducing it as needed. Whimsicott is a great Pokémon for this as it can play some intense support: aside from Tailwind, Light Screen and Reflect are immensely helpful in mitigating damage, and Charm and Confide can help to cripple foes' statistically, often forcing switches!

What counters a Sun team? Unequivocally, without that secondary weather setter, you'll be killed by a Sand team: there are just too many disadvantages for you to be able to cope, and probably not even then since they may have their own weather setter. Including Pokémon with Grass Knot can be helpful if you choose not to throw in a Chlorophyll Pokémon - Greninja works well - since these Sand team Pokémon are often very heavy. Low Kick is also good, and you can use generic Fighting moves to take out Tyranitar. Outside of weather teams, your common problem will certainly be Rock and Ground Pokémon just in general; a lot of your team will need be focused on the mitigation of these problems for your team to be successful.

Weather Team - Sandstorm: Sandstorm - often called just Sand - is a useful type for a Pokémon team aimed towards bulkiness, and it is easily paired in conjunction with a Trick Room team. There are quite a few abilities and Mega Pokémon choices to use on all three fronts of Speed, Attack, and Defense, not to mention Sandstorm's own boost of 50% to Rock Pokémon's Special Defense! The two choices you have for a Sand team are Tyranitar/its Mega and Hippowdon. Tyranitar has obscene Attack and its Mega Forme moreso, but it has an annoying weakness to Fighting. Hippowdon can be more safe, but ... well, you don't get it to do much beyond that. Tyranitar is almost the unilateral favorite.

What abilities make a Sand team great?


  • Sand Force provides a boost to the power of Rock, Steel, and Ground moves during a Sandstorm. Excadrill, Mega Garchomp, and Mega Steelix all provide this and can abuse their STAB. Excadrill is probably best left to Sand Rush with a Life Orb or Choice Band, and Mega Steelix won't add much to the team's movepool (though it can add some nasty power on a Trick Room/Sandstorm team with Gyro Ball). Mega Garchomp would be your essential one to include for this.

  • Sand Rush doubles the Speed of the wielder during a Sandstorm: Excadrill gets this and it allows him to outspeed a huge threat in Greninja, which is a threat not only due to its commonality but also the ways it can hit weaknesses. Sandslash also gets this, but he's not nearly as strong.

  • Sand Veil raises one's Evasion rate in a Sandstorm. For reasons elaborated upon later, this is not that good of an ability to use since it is luck-reliant. This would be a reason to use Cacturne or Helioptile, though!

At this point, then, you are getting a gist of the general structure of your team, but there's quite a few good Mega Pokémon for your team as well!

  • Mega Garchomp makes use of its Sand Force to abuse the competition via Sand Force, and it adds some nice type variety to the team by introducing Dragon moves into the movepool. It has a pesky Ice weakness that it cannot shake, however.
  • Mega Steelix works well in a Trick/Sandstorm team by having a powerful Gyro Ball and also being insanely defensive physically, but not nearly so in Special Defense.
  • Mega Tyranitar just hits like a truck, and can overcome the Special Defense decrement that seemed to be dealt out to all Rock types at creation with the proper EV/IV/Nature set. The problem lies in its low Speed and its weakness to Fighting ... but that can be circumvented by the inclusion of a Ghost Pokémon and wise switching.

Here would be a very general outline for your ideal Sandstorm team (non-Trick Room):

  • (Mega-)Tyranitar
  • (Mega-)Gengar <-- the switch that prevents problems with Tyranitar's Fighting weakness, doesn't need to be him but it helps to add variety not to mention adding a Ground immunity for further switching aid; Chandelure can help with other type variety issues
  • Four other slots

Yup, that's about as specific as you can get with a Sandstorm team: Tyranitar and a Ghost Pokémon. Beyond that, you want to construct a team around your Mega and these two/three Pokémon's weaknesses and problem areas. For example, if I were to include Mega Garchomp, I'd look for a way to cover its Ice weakness, such as by including Aerodactyl or Choice Band Talonflame. Were I to opt for Mega Tyranitar, I'd look for ways to increase my type coverage. Were I to choose Mega Steelix, I'd cover its painful Water weakness by including Helioptile. It really all depends on your team. The important thing is to include some Pokémon with Sand Force/Rush as applicable if you end up with blank slots after all the type coverage is done to make them into additional powerhouses.

As usual, I'll note also that you should include multiple Pokémon with Sandstorm. In the case of Mega Tyranitar, where you're more or less certain to KO to annoying opposite weather setter by the time you go Mega if you time it properly, you don't have to worry so much about this so long as you're good with prediction in Team Preview. Other teams will want a secondary Pokémon to induce Sandstorm, doesn't really matter who in particular, though Speed is a good characteristic.

What counters a Sandstorm team? Teams heavy in Fighting Pokémon, as well as Water and Grass Pokémon, will thrive. Water is mostly a problem after Sandstorm fades away since you have the Sp. Def. boost until then on your Rock Pokémon, but the other two are a pretty consistent problem. That is in fact the bane of the Sand team: Rock's myriad weaknesses and low Sp. Def. Training to affect the proper changes to balance out your Sp. Def. will force the team to go to Trick Room/Sandstorm in some cases, so the inclusion of Chandelure will be helpful as it can counter these Pokémon in a number of ways (Grass via Fire Blast/Heat Wave, Fighting via Psychic, and Water via Energy Ball): he'll have to have Choice Scarf to get ahead of the big threats, or get an aid from Tailwind.

Weather Team - Hail: Hail teams are overwhelmingly the least-used teams of the weather metagame, and for good reason. Not only does the only Snow Warning Pokémon in the metagame - Abomasnow and, more recently, Aurorus with its Hidden Ability - have ridiculously common double-weaknesses, most Pokémon that would profit from the condition in any form are Ice-type, a type known for being frail and not that strong. You run into some problems in choosing this team, to the point that I'm not sure where to begin. I'll just try to assure you it's not that worth it.

Pseudo-Weather Team - Trick Room: Trick Room is a pseudoweather condition (it's read as weather by the game anyhow), and it is perhaps the biggest shock to players when they first encounter it. Many players will begin their competitive Pokémon battling career with a team that has two foci: to be the fastest around, and to be the hits-like-a-truck-est around. Achieving that balance is an accolade in itself, but it means nothing if you cannot counter a Trick Room team. Trick Room teams are inherently the most problematic of the "weather" conditions as there are many Pokémon that can make use of it and its characteristics rely on bulk. But, first, let's say you were making the team.

Where to begin? As with any weather team, your construction begins with the Trick Room setter, and there are a ton of them! Slowking and Cresselia are among the most common, particularly the latter as of late as it can be useful through bulk and support. Aromatisse has become common since it can stave off Taunt threats and then play support as well. Who plays the Trick Room out of them all? (There's far more than these common ones!) Firstly, someone that is inherently slow. For the leading Trick Room, you'll also a bulky Pokémon as well, someone who can stand at least one good super-effective hit; that's why Cresselia is used often, as it can take sometimes two super-effective, STAB hits if done well. It has base 120 HP and Defense and base 130 Sp. Def., which is hard to cut through if trained defensively. But just in general you'll want bulkiness and slowness. Coming in with a Sitrus Berry on can be further helpful to this goal, or Leftovers if your setter's goal is to be around for a while.

While you're setting up this one Trick Room Pokémon, before going anywhere else, grabbing another one or two will also be helpful. As with the other conditions, the obvious reason is to keep your advantage; furthermore, unlike the other weather conditions, there is no "rock" to extend it like some weather teams will use. Some people will even include Trick Room on their own Speed-oriented team just to cut you off when you use Trick Room on a TR team! And then your setter is dead and where are you? Unlike the other teams, regardless of the situation, TR teams are completely crippled by not having TR in play. If you had a Sand team, you might be fine if your opponent used a Sun team when your weather went out. TR teams are crippled without TR because the majority of teams are Speed oriented at least in some fashion: you might have the bulk to weather the hits, but if they're taking out half of your attackers per turn (like one Pokémon per turn in a Double Battle), your offense is falling fast. You need to have multiple TR setters. In a Singles Battle, have four or more; Double Battles, 2-3; Triple Battles, 1-3; maybe more if it won't sacrifice team variety or the use of Protect on Pokémon.

Now, with that over with, how do you select the remaining Pokémon for your team? Since you've basically assured your going first most turns via the use of Trick Room, you will be good with slow, strong, bulky Pokémon. How do you choose these Pokémon? Look at the section Pokémon by Speed: you'll see a lot of slow Pokémon and, once you filter past the crappy, unevolved ones, a lot of gems. Marowak can be an aid, for example, by having insane Attack with its Thick Club. Mega Ampharos adds a lot of type variety and great Sp. Atk. and bulk, whereas Mega Mawile can bring in some bulk of its own and physical power, not to mention it can function outside of Trick Room as well, particularly via Sucker Punch. Reuniclus and Conkeldurr add their varieties. You have a lot of good choices. If you want to get into specifics, usually aiming for under a base Speed of 55 is good.

Key characteristics for most of your attacking Pokémon, however, will include one of two things: either a crapton of power or a crapton of good multitarget moves. Marowak works great because of Thick Club- and STAB-boosted Earthquake; Chandelure favors Life Orb- or Choice Specs- (both with STAB-) boosted Heat Wave; Mega Mawile has that Huge Power ability; and so on. After all, you will likely be Protect-stalled by most Speed-oriented teams when Trick Room comes up, so having that ability to hit and KO as many Pokémon at once will be a nice help.

The problems with a Trick Room team? These were outlined previously: a Trick Room team must keep Trick Room up to succeed, or it crumbles apart in mere turns. Many players will also not be able to hide the obviousness of a Trick Room team: once you get a Trick Room team initially, it will be clearly slow. It is obvious to any skilled, experienced player when a Trick Room team is going to be used, and, if you're not careful, who the setter will be! If they kill off your setters, you're absolutely screwed. Having multiple setters is an undervalued tactic; out of over 1,000 battles, I've never seen another player use the weather/TR condition again aside from when I somehow fail to kill the initial setter. This element of surprise cannot ever be undervalued.

The problem with that lies in Trick Room's -7 Priority. You will certainly go last when using Trick Room, and you need to mitigate threats to that somehow. The most common problem is Taunt; Taunt is packed on a number of Pokémon, commonly Gengar and Absol. How do you counter that? You need to put a Mental Herb on your initial setter for the battle; people almost never double-Taunt a Pokémon (you'll almost never see Taunt on a team twice, for that matter), so that gives you some safety. Aromatisse won't need to worry about that, though. The main problem is actually getting killed before you can get off that Trick Room. In Single Battles, there's not a lot of ways to circumvent that besides wisely predicting your foe's lead Pokémon. In other types of battles, you can easily do this by having, for example, Follow Me or Rage Powder. An alternative to that is using a Pokémon with high Speed on your team that allies your lead Pokémon; this Pokémon will be grossly inhibited with Trick Room in place, however ... unless it has a priority move, making Talonflame an oddly viable Trick Room Pokémon. Furthermore-- actually, I'll cover that in a second.

In short? A Trick Room team has a glaring advantage over 90% of teams in the Pokémon metagame, making it the most threatening weather condition of them all to be faced with, but the problems lies in when it goes away. Good players will be able to make teams that survive both in and out of Trick Room, and others can wall their way through it with Protect/Detect/etc. and good switching, so being able to keep the Trick Room up and being able to get it off in the first place are two key components of your team.

Supported Team - Tailwind: Tailwind is an oddly underused condition; it happens, trust me, but rather infrequently, and why is beyond me. Tailwind is a status that applies to your entire team in a battle and doubles their Speed for the next four turns or so, excluding the turn on which it is used, making it very threatening. Even Pokémon like Marowak and Mega Ampharos, with base 45 in Speed, can exceed very fast Pokémon like Greninja if Tailwind is in place; Tailwind is like Trick Room in its own way, but it can go first and provides more versatility.

More on that in a second. So, what is a good Tailwind setter? Firstly, it would have to be a Pokémon that can execute it first in the turn: that means either Prankster or Gale Wings, making Whimsicott and Talonflame great choices. Whimsicott is the more supportive option, being able to pack in a number of other supportive skills as well like Light Screen, Reflect, Charm, Confide, Sunny Day, and more; Talonflame allows for a more offensive mindset, boosting Brave Bird at +1 priority and STAB-boosted Flare Blitz or Overheat (depending on your choice) that can be great to revenge-kill or to hit the annoying weak-to-only-Fire Pokémon on teams like Scizor, Ferrothorn, and Forretress.

What makes a good Tailwind team? You'd think first off that it'd be fast Pokémon that are powerful but not quite fast enough to exceed their counters. In a way that is correct, but the ideal definition is "bulky Pokémon that are somewhat slow normally". See, the goal of a Tailwind team would be to have Pokémon in the range of a base Speed of 45+, and the primary beneficiaries in 45~65. Why is this? Pokémon of base 45 Speed by themselves can outspeed over 99% of Pokémon, and once you hit around 60~65 (depending on your choice of Nature) you begin to outspeed every Pokémon except Speed Forme Deoxys!

"Okay, but why not just have really, really fast Pokémon?" See, the thing is that a good Tailwind team will be made of somewhat slow Pokémon. Base values of 45~65 to the main beneficiaries will make it so that you outspeed the Speed-oriented teams ... but what about the Trick Room teams? Tailwind teams are going to be heavily offensive because of the Speed restriction (it's mostly a coincidence thing, that slow Pokémon tend to be less supportive), so you can't easily Taunt away a Trick Room team, and even then, you might not manage. You need a way to deal with a Trick Room team. Most Speed-oriented teams will focus on Taunt or KO'ing the Trick Room setter when it appears, but those methods fail. So, what am I getting at?

A team that is not only viable against Speed teams but also against Trick Room teams. The ideal Tailwind team is in a unique position because of this. You activate Tailwind, you outspeed everyone. You don't activate it and you are beating Trick Room teams. The flexibility can be quite amazing. The problems will lie in getting used to both conditions because each requires a different strategy. See, when you make a Tailwind team, your main beneficiaries are those in the 45-65 base Speed range, but that's not the only Pokémon that can benefit. For example, Tailwind exceeds the benefits of Choice Scarf by 33%. You can give that Scarfed Pokémon a Life Orb, an Expert Belt, Specs, or a Band, making it into a powerhouse. Some Pokémon cannot be easily beaten even with fast Pokémon without this kind of an aid, like Landorus-Therian with its Choice Scarf. Therefore, not only should you focus on the generalization of "beating fast and slow", but also beating the common threats by including faster Pokémon on your team, just a few that can counter these annoying common threats. Finding that balance will be the hardest part of your trek in making this team (probably the hardest of all to make) because you need to find some sweeper Pokémon that suffice well for sweeping despite the inclusion of Protect. (You need something to help you when you reuse Tailwind.) Critical types to include on these faster Pokémon are Fire, Ice, Electric, and Fighting: that will counter most of the types of the game and get the important double-weaknesses.

The problems with a Tailwind team? Firstly, Tailwind teams can easily be Taunted out, but that's only if you're stupid enough to not abuse priority from Prankster/Gale Wings. If the Taunter has Prankster themselves, you ought to be able to outspeed them nonetheless. (Analysis of Whimsicott/Talonflame compared to Prankster users reveals that you should be fine, particularly in the case of Talonflame.) Reintroducing Tailwind can itself be a problem given the lack of users of Tailwind that are truly viable: your most common ones are Whimsicott, Talonflame, and bulky Mental Herb support Togekiss, and when you have a team mostly about offense, support Togekiss doesn't fit well. In other words, your team has to strong enough to kill off most Pokémon in the four turns of Tailwind, and if not at least have the faster Pokémon be capable: in other words, you keep the fast Pokémon in the reserves regardless of the situation. If they're your lead in fights versus Speed, then you may end up with no Tailwind and slow Pokémon; if you lead with them against Trick Room teams, they can get slaughtered; getting that swap is pretty key to the Trick Room team's survival.

Support Team - Lightning Rod: In Double Battles particularly, when one begins to think of a themed team, they go one of two ways: either to weather or to Lightning Rod for whatever reason. Lightning Rod is a strategy with its benefits as it allows for quick increments in one's Sp. Atk.

For executing the Lightning Rod strategy, you need to have two or three Pokémon wielding Lightning Rod as an ability, and it must be a Double or Triple Battle. Effective Pokémon include Manectric, Pikachu with Light Ball, and Mega Sceptile. From there, you need to have your allies use Discharge as much as possible. (Ironically, that means Mega Sceptile's ally will not be boosted.) Lightning Rod activates and boosts the ally's/allies' Sp. Atk. by 1 stage. In Double Battles, you can get in turn Discharges a turn to boost your team's Sp. Atk. quickly enough; the middle Pokémon, were this to be used in a Triple Battle, would end boosting the middle Pokémon's Sp. Atk. to +2 stages (doubled). That's high.

An unusually underused tactic - actually, I've NEVER seen it - is to have one of the beneficiaries of the Discharge have the Motor Drive ability, like with Electivire. This allows you to focus EVs on bulk rather than Speed because, after one Discharge, you'll be at +50% Speed. Dunno why it's not used.

The problems are actually quite nasty. Firstly, for the most part, you are opening your team up to weaknesses by having heavy type favoring; in this case, you have a lot of Electric Pokémon, so you begin to hurt yourself by opening yourself up to Ground. Secondly, you lose type coverage since a number of Pokémon have to have Discharge. Thirdly, you are using Discharge on the first few turns; Discharge will be reduced by 25% in power due to its multitarget nature, making it unlikely to KO unless it hits a weakness, which means you can easily get set-up on or even have these Pokémon easily killed. It's a flawed strategy at best that I only include here for the fact that it is unusually common.

Support Team - Water/Volt Absorb: These tactics work on many of the same guideliens as the Lightning Rod tactic, but rather than using Lightning Rod and Discharge, they use Volt Absorb with Discharge or Water Absorb with Surf. This allows the Pokémon - particularly Life Orb users - to restore HP pretty readily. The problems are much the same: type coverage loss, common weaknesses, and the repeated use of weak moves.

Miscellaneous Team - Monotype: Monotyped teams are interesting in themselves: the choice to include a single type of Pokémon only on a team seems hypocritical to every guideline of basic Pokémon strategy, at least at a first glance. You could come in against a Fire Monotype team wielding a Rain team and think that you'll win, but then lose swiftly. What's up with this? You need to remember that the person almost certainly is doing it intentionally.

Building a team around a single type only can have its benefits. The most prominent center around that there literally is only one type on the team: that means they all share common weaknesses. It simplifies things; whereas the common team often contains weaknesses to at least 12-15 of the 18 types in the game somewhere amongst its members, these Monotype teams only have weaknesses to 1-5, depending on the type. The problem comes in with the mitigation of these problem. Okay, your team is weak to five teams. How do you counter a team that has these types?

Simple. Every Pokémon is not limited to moves of its own type; in fact, many Pokémon can learn moves of other types. I mean, that is the basis of Pokémon battling: not just using STAB moves, using other moves. Some Pokémon will even be encouraged to use moves that are not STAB ones! Other dual-typed Pokémon can contribute well to a Monotype team. For example, Rock is a common Fire weakness and can inhibit Fire Monotypes; why not bring Blaziken, whose Sky Uppercut or High Jump Kick STABs, or Earthquake even, can help out? Grass is an annoying Water Monotype problem; bring Greninja, who can use Ice Beam! Ground is a problem plaguing Electric Monotypes; bring Rotom-Wash, who can blast 'em away again (?) with Hydro Pump! (Not to mention being a viable switch-in counter to Ground Pokémon!)

Monotype teams have no truly inherent problems, at least no more than the typical Speed-oriented team. Their problem lies in perfecting their construction as it is hard to make a team that adequately counters the weaknesses of its six constituents, given that you have to go to the level of individual Pokémon at times to manage. For example, Blaziken would not function as well with its Fighting moves or Earthquake against Aerodactyl, who outspeeds it: you may need to bring Air Balloon Heatran on a Fire Monotype to be able to deal with that. In fact, NO Fire Pokémon outspeeds it; you need a Pokémon that can wall its attacks instead. This latter analysis will be in particular underused, so that is where a Monotype team will fail. A Monotype team cannot simply focus on its problem areas, either, but also, like every other Pokémon team, aiming to kill 'em all: because of the emphasis needed to perfect the problem areas, the areas where most teams would succeed can fall apart. Finding the ideal balance is what makes most Monotype teams crash and burn because there is a huge emphasis on balance and perfection that is just difficult to adequately meet.




The Element of Luck



What does any one Pokémon battle ultimately come down to? Does it come down to skill? To statistics? To execution? Or to just dumb luck? What is the ultimate controlling characteristic?

What most top-level Pokémon players will agree upon that this aspect is will be luck. It all comes down to two factors in a battle setting: the [85...100] portion of the damage formula that can make a move 15% less powerful than normal as well as the baseline-1/16 critical-hit chance. Accuracy also plays a role in this, but these two are the overriding things. It is VERY possible to lose or win a battle on pure dumb luck, all just because someone got in a critical hit at the right time or just because someone managed to miss or because someone Protected twice in a row and it worked the second time. Hell, I've had all three happen to me and be caused by me. >_> When a Pokémon survives a hit with just 1 HP, it oftentimes can be dropped down to luck. When a Pokémon gets out of Frozen state in one turn or 20, it is just good luck or bad luck, depending on who you were. When a Pokémon gets 5 critical-hits in a freakin' row, you can claim that all-knowing god of hax, the RNGesus, luck, screwed you over (or blessed you).

Can you mitigate the influence of luck? Yes. Most of the section preceding here is designed for that purpose. It's not just luck that influences the game -- it is skill, it is strategy that ultimately determines to true victor. That's why the VGC format runs "best of 3" matches: because it is possible to lose a battle on luck. It is even the same reason that the tiered formats on Smogon and Pokémon Showdown ban stuff like Evasion buffs/debuffs and pretty much anything luck-based: you may not like that, but keep in mind that the two are intended to help your skill and reduce the influence of luck. Yes, we all like Greninja. (Okay, most of us.) We hated it when he got moved to Ubers. (Or liked it.) But if you're using Pokémon Showdown for the intent of just using high-quality Pokémon against lower ones, you're misusing the battle simulators; you don't have to like it, after all, but the increment in skill is the primary focus of Smogon and Showdown. This is coming from someone who doesn't particularly play tiers on Smogon anymore, for the record, though I did in the past. If you're looking for level gameplay where you're intended to test your skills, you play the Battle Maison, the Battle Spot, and Battle Spot Doubles/VGC Doubles on Showdown or in real life. If you are looking for gameplay to improve your skills, you'll play the tiers until you get sick of them like I did. (Not to mention - I cannot emphasize this enough - Singles are far less balanced than Doubles, and Doubles is therefore more fun.)

But the problem in all of this is that, no matter how much you anally analyze the game, no matter how much you mitigate damage, no matter how many times you improbe your team's weaknesses or a lack thereof, no matter how much time you put into the game, you will never be able to change the damage or critical-hit formulas. You will never be able to get rid of luck. Skill can improve your chances of surviving on the whole, but you will always be able to lose. Luck will always play its role. Your goal as a Pokémon Trainer is to play the game and train your Pokémon to that point that luck's influence is minimized that you win fewer and fewer battles just because you got lucky (or the inverse of that, that you lost because you were unlucky).

The preceding article hopefully helped you on your way to getting to that point by teaching you the basics of competitive Pokémon battling. Only you can improve upon this knowledge base now by improving your own skills and growing more experienced. (Not to mention telling me other topics to cover!) Only by improving can you lessen the effects of luck. You will never be able to eliminate luck, but you can always get better; you will never be able to win every battle, but you surely can win many of them if you improve your skills!+



Idealizing Pokémon Stats



Okay, good, so you've finally got some practice with Pokémon battling on the competitive level. As you can probably guess, you were mainly meant to get your feet wet with the scene; if you actually made an ideal, ladder-climbing, championship-ready team, I'd be more than surprised (albeit happy for you). Once you've gotten some experience, it's about time you need to understand how to idealize your Pokémon's EV, IV, and Nature spreads.

"Wait a minute, what the heck? You went over that before."

Yes, I did. The basics. There are some things that only experience could teach you, particularly given the dynamic nature of the Pokémon metagame and how I'm not going to update this thing with every common Pokémon, EV spread, whatever. As you've probably noticed, there are several Pokémon that are KO'ing you with ease, and others you may have trouble smacking around; and the inverse as well, Pokémon you are beating the stuffing out of and those your opponent can't even touch. In competitive Pokémon battling, there's a degree to which "overkill" is just that - overkill, superfluous, unnecessary. Let's say you're doing enough damage to not only KO a Blaziken in one hit, but doing 120 HP's worth of damage beyond that. That extra damage - that extra power - doesn't necessarily serve you any purpose, because a KO is a KO. The EVs overpowering that Attack could be the thing that let you get the bulk sufficient to survive other attacks!

And thus, the element of experience. As we'll go over in the next section, you'll see that there are two main groups of Pokémon that are "threats". Pokémon that are "threats by commonality" (those used on a lot of teams), and Pokémon that are "specific threats" (threats specifically to your team). Experience should have let you learned both over time. Now comes the time to learn how to attempt to really best them.

It helps to have a damage calculator to test this stuff out; the one provided by Pokémon Showdown is by far the best.

http://pokemonshowdown.com/damagecalc/

We'll first cover defensive idealization - that is, assuring that you aren't easily KO'ed by threats.

Now, you'll want to enter a Pokémon on your team, and its threat on the opposite side. Using your knowledge of the meta (either through experience or research), try making the threat attack your Pokémon and you'll see some kind of damage ratio based on that attack. For example, say I'm trying to make sure that my Mega Gardevoir isn't OHKO'd by Aegislash using STAB + super-effective Shadow Ball.

252+ SpA Aegislash-Blade Shadow Ball vs. 0 HP / 0 SpD Mega Gardevoir: 132-156 (92.3 - 109%) -- 50% chance to OHKO

Well, that's upsetting. What you want to do now is adjust your Pokémon's EV spread - and, for defensive/redirection/support Pokémon, often even Nature - to survive this hit. As my Mega Gardevoir is offensive, I'd rather keep my Modest or Quiet Nature, and I obviously have maxed defensive IVs, so I'll fiddle with her HP and Sp. Def. EVs. In general, the process is this:


  • Try altering the Pokémon's EVs in each a little and see which has a greater effect on your Pokémon's damage, and do so for each 4 EVs added.
  • If your Pokémon uses Leftovers or Sitrus Berry and usually has HP investment anyways, try increasing its HP investment or just keeping it as high as possible. If offensive, do try to avoid taking EVs out of both HP and the offensive stat, but, if needed, you will want to work more on the offensive optimization first.
  • Also note that, in Level 50 gameplay like VGC, it takes 8 EVs to make a full point in a stat occur. However, the first 4 EVs of that 8 (0.5 points) will still work. So, 4, 12, 20, etc., EVs get a point. Remember that since it can give you a spare 4 EVs elsewhere.
  • Also always try to account for whether you'll want or will be using stuff like Intimidate to lower the opposing Pokémon's Attack. Full-attack Mega Kangaskhan is a LOT different from one at 2/3 Attack. And the same should be true for weather and the like.
  • Repeat the process as needed for your team's threats and the common threats.

This is a good showing of what you'll want after the aforementioned Aegislash-vs.-Mega Gardevoir evaluation.

252+ SpA Aegislash-Blade Shadow Ball vs. 108 HP / 0 SpD Mega Gardevoir: 132-156 (84 - 99.3%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

Notice my range here: it ends in 99.3%, not 100%. As much as possible, you'll want to assure that you don't get into OHKO range, no matter how little the chance. (That's not to say there aren't times when it's appropriate, or sometimes necessary or even avoidable. It depends on which threats you're focusing again.) Usually, we work on defensive optimization first across several different Pokémon, both physical and special threats, before moving on to the offensive optimization, as we can then devote the EVs in our offense as much as necessary, and any spare can go to further bulk.

The process of offensive optimization is much the same as defensive, but now it's YOU trying to hit the common threat. Let's take a Support Cresselia I own versus Landorus-Therian, the classic VGC example. This works nicely, since Cresselia is a supportive Pokémon whose main intent, on my team, is to OHKO Landorus-T whereas my other Pokémon can't do so easily.

0 SpA Cresselia Ice Beam vs. 4 HP / 0 SpD Landorus-T: 132-156 (80 - 94.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

Given that Landorus-T isn't much of a threat to Cresselia (seriously, nothing unboosted can OHKO it with a critical-hit reliably, it's insane), and you're using a reasonable set for Landorus-T, you have a good starting point. Given that Cresselia is usually reliant on its bulk (it runs support otherwise in this case), you want to hit a specific benchmark based on commonality and get out of there, leaving the rest of the EVs in bulk where it can be useful. Since it's supportive, it won't have an Sp. Atk.-boosting Nature, and we so instead just run up its Sp. Atk. EVs until we get the guaranteed KO on a common set:

212 SpA Cresselia Ice Beam vs. 4 HP / 0 SpD Landorus-T: 168-200 (101.8 - 121.2%) -- guaranteed OHKO

This time, we want the minimum percentage to be as close to - but at least equal to or above - 100% as possible.

This set shows a classic issue: when is the optimization too heavy? Indeed, 212 EVs may seem like a LOT of bulk that could go to HP instead of KO'ing a Landorus-T when you may even have access to other Ice Beam or Ice Punch users. That ultimate judgment lies with you and in your defensive analysis. For Cresselia, it works well because it's bulky as hell and can get 1/8 of its HP back by Protect-aided Leftovers, 33% from a Sitrus Berry triggered by an attack that would usually result in a 2HKO, or even 50% by Moonlight. For Greninja or other frail attackers, max offense and max Speed can work better since there's pretty much no defensive optimization of use that can occur. And, of course, we may run into this situation...

252+ SpA Life Orb Cresselia Ice Beam vs. 0 HP / 0 SpD Mega Salamence: 114-135 (67 - 79.4%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

... where, no matter how heavily the set becomes optimized, we cannot get the OHKO we want. That means we go down to the next most important benchmark, and the one below that, and so on, trying to hit the best, most useful benchmark we can. What determines the tiering of benchmarks, though? That, I cannot answer for you - again, the meta is dynamic, Pokémon get nerfed minorly and majorly with new entries in the series, and it all depends on how your team can handle them without a benchmark. For example, if you wanted to optimize a Rain Dance team, not much need to worry over your average Ninetales, right?

The ultimate goal of this process is to assure two things - that your Pokémon can get the KO's it needs to get, and that your Pokémon can take as many hits as possible or move as fast as possible. Superfluous EVs aren't going to help in the long-run except against weird sets or untrained Pokémon, which are rare in the real-life competitive environment - most people will use reasonable sets there.

One final note - EV-creeping. EV-creeping - or generally known as power-creeping or, in its more common use, Speed-creeping - is the deliberate manipulation of EVs in a very specific fashion that is akin to optimization. The goal is usually to help counteract the exact same Pokémon you're using in one fashion or another while trying to minimize the threat to yourself. For example, when two bulky Mega Kangaskhan using the same, general stat-spread face each other, their Speed stats are the same. That can result in the whole battle being a 50-50 shot, since Mega Kangaskhan's Low Kick will KO another in many instances. By bolstering your Speed by 4/8 EVs in this instance, though, you get that 1-point advantage that, while minuscule, allows you to avoid that very specific threatening situation. Most expert creeping will affect 2 or 3 points, a counteraction to Speed-creeping.




Threat Analysis



So, we've established that certain Pokémon can give you trouble, and that there are ways to help counteract a good chunk of them, so long as you play well. The problem lies in identifying what these are in the first place. Generally, I like to identify the threats like this:

  • Threats by Commonality: These are Pokémon you need to watch out for, because a LOT of teams use them. In the Pokémon OR/AS VGC metagame, for example, the commonality threats are Mega Kangskhan, Thunduurs, Landorus, Milotic, Bisharp, Cresselia, Heatran, Amoonguss, Mega Charizard Y, Mega Gardevoir, Aegislash, Sylveon, and Mega Metagross, to name off a good chunk of them.

  • Specific Threats: These are Pokémon that threatening SPECIFICALLY to your team. The Break My Team tool mentioned in the Beginners' section helps to analyze the Pokémon that are going to try to screw with your team. Most teams will still have that one Pokémon that *can* mess them up; you'll have to find a way to deal with it, since that calculator doesn't account for Speed and several other determining factors. An (extreme) example of a team-specific threat would be a Rock-type Monotype team versus a Flying-type Monotype team, seeing as Aerodactyl, Omastar, Armaldo, and more aren't too common.

  • Common Themes: Can your team handle Sun teams? Rain? Sand? Trick Room? These are the four main weather types seen in competitive gameplay; Hail appears occasionally, but not enough to be a concern to the average player. Counteractions to these for ALL teams are crucial, just as with the (albeit dynamic) commons threats. Handling these is better done on the front of Speed than EV optimization, however, since it would be very hard to get a Pokémon, which is neutral to Fire, optimized against Mega Charizard Y's Fire Blast in the Sun; better to find a way to get a good OHKO on it before said Fire Blast.

  • Gimmick Threats: More common in online and Showdown play than in real-life tourneys, having the ability to counter a general "gimmick" team will help. Common gimmicks include Clefable with Minimize and Follow Me, Smeargle with Dark Void and other status moves (such as Transform to get a double Mega), and the use of Beat Up on a Pokémon wielding Justified (commonly Terrakion).




Walkthrough

Layout Notes (READ!)

Here, I will try to briefly describe some of the stuff you will see as you navigate through this FAQ/Walkthrough - primarily overly-technical stuff you'll find in tables at the start of sections so I don't have to pointlessly describe this stuff in an area using several paragraphs while only writing a two-word walkthrough. Plus, it's a nice quick-paste bank for me. =P If you don't see some of this stuff for a particular area, assume that means none of that is there: no Pokémon encounters table, no Pokémon.

LOCALIZATION: There are multiple releases of Pokémon Red, Blue, and Green, and each with different variations. For the most part, you can assume this game to be written from the viewpoint of Pokémon Red Version's US counterpart. However, all version-exclusive details that I know of where accounted for with playthroughs of a US Pokémon Blue and the Japanese Pokémon Green deriving these details.

DIVISIONS: Each badge's section will begin with a sectional flowchart. This flowchart denotes the areas we'll go to whilst traversing to the named badge, and in the order named. These sections will be headed off with a horizontal line above and below the section's name. Any sub-divisions from there, if any, will be simply bolded at the start of the paragraph.

TABLE INFORMATION: We'll finish off the rest of this section with an analysis on the type of data that you'll see throughout this FAQ. Most of the info not represented here (treasure checklists, shops, and the like) should be obvious enough to keep me from having to detail it. As for the table data? It's below. Take note that it is mostly fake; it's just to test column widths and such on my end. First, we'll cover the Wild Encounters data.

As you can likely tell from the below table, if you're used to older Pokémon games, these Pokémon games lack several characteristics commonly found in later Pokémon games. Most prominent is that of Abilities: they will not be found here. Additionally, the "Special" stat, in terms of numbers, is analogized to the Sp. Atk. of later games, but it will function as both Sp. Atk. and Sp. Def. if you're familiar with those mechanics. And, of course, only 15 types existed in Pokémon Red, Blue, and Green: any types thereafter (Dark and Steel in 1999, and Fairy in 2013) do not. Okay so far?


LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Magikarp Electric/Flying 77 77 66 66 11 All
Pikachu Electric 2 1 5 0 132 Red
Clefairy Normal 999 999 999 999 999 Blue/Green

  • Pokémon Species: Denotes what kind of Pokémon it is: its default English name, really.

  • Pokémon Type: Type is used to determine extra damage multipliers when fighting.

  • Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats: See the section on Stat Experience for exactly what this means and why it is how it is.

  • Version: There are three versions of this Pokémon release: Pokémon Red, Pokémon Blue, and Pokémon Green. Pokémon Red was the one that went everywhere, in and out of Japan. Pokémon Green remained Japan-only. Pokémon Blue was intended to only be outside of Japan, but was later brought there. Pokémon Blue and Green are, for the most part, completely the same: however, where Pokémon Blue has blue graphics when played on the original GameBoy or a GameBoy Player, Pokémon Green's are green. There are other differences, of course, between those two. However, most differences among the three will mostly devolve to Pokémon Red versus Pokémon Blue/Green, and thus includes Pokémon only available in specific versions of the games.


POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Mewtwo Dragonite Dragon/Flying
Red [none] Magikarp Water
Blue/Green [none] Pikachu Electric

Most of the info denoted here can be derived from the wild encounters table. This basically will note possible Pokémon trades or gifts in an area. The first row of the table denotes what a trade will look like, while the second is what a gift will look like: note how the second row as a "[none]" in the "Pokémon Given" column to note that it comes for free.


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Rayquaza Lv. 1, Hydreigon Lv. 255, Missingno. Lv. 0
#2 Zigzagoon Lv. 10, Pikachu Lv. 11
#3 Snivy Lv. 20 (x2), Tepig Lv. 50 (x4)
#4 Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle, Torchic, Treecko; all Lv. 20

This table denotes some data on trainers in an area. Included are their Pokémon party. Since Trainers in Pokémon R/B/G usually don't give a specific name, they're most often simply referred to by a number in this list, as the trainers are listed are in the order in which you'll encounter them in the game. No info is given on actual strategy as this info is usually very repetitive and pointless; except in a low-level game, you should be able to win the battles if you've progressed this far. Of particular note are some notations in the latter two rows. The "(x#)" notation means that there are # Pokémon of that species and level - not necessarily anything else - in that trainer's party. In the latter, that means that all five of those Pokémon are Level 20; it helps to save some room on both ends. Of course, this is placed only in an "If I have to" instance, since I'm writing this pre-format section without regard to the game's content at the moment, so you might not even see 'em.


BOSS: Master KeyBlade999

  • Rewards: $999,999,999, Earthbadge

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Arceus Fairy Level 100 N/A
Kyogre Water Level 53 N/A
Charizard Fire/Flying Level 50 Chose Bulbasaur as a starter
Venusaur Grass/Poison Level 50 Chose Squirtle as a starter
Blastoise Water Level 50 Chose Charmander as a starter
Pikachu Electric Level 66 Playing Pokémon Red
Pichu Electric Level 33 Playing Pokémon Blue


This blue box is used to denote relatively difficult boss battles: typically Gym Leaders and the like. Initially, you'll see the various rewards for the battle. Next is that trainer's party. Note that, like all mainstream games, the opponent's party may differ depending on the circumstances of the battle. For example, all of the mainstream games have have at least one of your rival's Pokémon differ depending on which starter you choose; Pokémon Black and White Versions even had that done doubly since you had two rivals and thusly all three starters distributed amongst you. (The rest of the table is pretty obvious.) Finally, below the table, will come some sort of strategy. As per my other Pokémon FAQs, it will primarily consist of several things: the Pokémon's type advantages/weaknesses, notably annoying moves, and perhaps Pokémon that would be ideal for this. I do this because your party could differ significantly from mine (especially if we're playing different versions of the game, or picked different starters, or you traded, or whatever), so be sure to keep this mind.


BoulderBadge



Sectional Flowchart






Game Start-Up



We'll begin the game by first beginning with the basics. Begin by inserting your cartridge into your console of choice and you'll soon go to the title screen of the game. There, you can opt to Continue a saved game, start a New Game, or adjust a few settings. Assuming you opt to start a new game, you'll soon meet with Professor Oak - the main Pokémon authority of the Kanto region in which you live. He'll give you basic info on Pokémon: these Pocket Monsters are animals with very special abilities. Some people capture them for pets, and others for battles (such as you), and others (such as Oak) for study. Your tenth birthday has arrived, and so it is your turn to go on a Pokémon journey. You'll be told to give your name, then that of Professor Oak's grandson, your rival. (Yes, he forgot his own grandson's name.) And, with this, the game begins.



Pallet Town



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Potion

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Note
All [none] Charmander Fire You only get one!
All [none] Squirtle Water
All [none] Bulbasaur Grass/Poison

Okay, once you gain control of yourself, you'll find yourself in your bedroom
in your house located in Pallet Town. Pallet Town is one of many locales in the
Kanto region of the Pokémon world. To Pallet's south is the ocean and Cinnabar;
to the north are forests. To the west, you'll find Mt. Silver, Tohjo Falls, and
the rest of the Johto region. (Which isn't in these games.)

Okay, anyhow, you're in your room. Interact with the PC and withdraw the Potion within the storage system. You can mess with the SNES here. As a note of trivia, in these games' remakes (FireRed and LeafGreen), you actually play with a NES. Anywho, head downstairs and outside.

Outside, go north and try to leave town. Professor Oak will stop you, telling you it is too dangerous in the tall grass to travel alone. You'll be escorted to Oak's lab, where you'll also find your rival. After a bit of complaining from your rival, you get to pick on of the Kanto starter Pokémon.


  • Bulbasaur, a Grass/Poison Pokémon, is on the left. It is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic, and has type advantages over Grass, Water, Rock, and Ground. It evolves into Ivysaur at Level 16 and Venusaur then at Level 32, being the earliest to reach its strongest stage. Overall, it will have the most advantage for the beginning player as it'll easily sweep the first two Gyms and won't run into significant problems until the Fire Gym.

  • Squirtle is the Water Pokémon in the middle, a type it retains throughout its evolutionary chain. Thus, it is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground, and weak to Grass and Electric. It will evolve at Level 16 to Wartortle, and then again at 36 to Blastoise. It will have an early advantage over Pewter's Rock-type Gym, but it will falter briefly with the third and fourth Gyms, typed for Electric and Grass Pokémon, respectively. Squirtle is a good Pokémon for the beginning player looking to actually grasp the concepts of Pokémon wherein you can't attempt to really solo the game with one Pokémon. Otherwise, you could look at it being for the moderately-skilled player.

  • Finally, you have Charmander on the right. It is initially of the Fire-type, as is Charmeleon, making it advantageous to Ice, Grass, and Bug, and Steel if traded to Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal. They are weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. Charmander evolves into Charmeleon at Level 16, then again to the Fire/Flying Pokémon Charizard at Level 36. Charizard is arguably the strongest of the three Pokémon and works well as a varied-attacking Pokémon. However, with Fire/Flying typing, Charizard gets an additional weakness to Electric and takes quadruple-damage from Rock, although it will be immune to Ground. Charmander and its evolutions have problems throughout the game, mostly the first two Gyms, the third for getting Charizard early, and the last one since Ground Pokémon tend to be able to learn Rock moves. Charmander is a nice start for those looking for some challenge.

Choose your starter, and nickname it if you so wish.

After this, your rival will choose their Pokémon. Their Pokémon will be chosen so that they end up with a Pokémon whose type is superior to yours. In other words, if you choose Bulbasaur, they get Charmander; if you get Squirtle, they get Bulbasaur; and if you get Charmander, they'll choose Squirtle. Technically-speaking, Charmander - once it becomes Charizard - will have two type advantages over Bulbasaur's evolutionary chain, although that's not as evident as it really ought to be. >_>

After you both receive your Pokémon, you will engage in a Pokémon battle!



BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $175

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charmander Fire Level 5 If Bulbasaur was your starter
Squirtle Water Level 5 If Charmander was your starter
Bulbasaur Grass/Poison Level 5 If Squirtle was your starter

In this battle, strategy is not as apparent as it will be in later battles: indeed, it's more of an attempt to get you used to Pokémon battles. In Pokémon battles, the goal is to reduce the HP of all your opponent's Pokémon to zero, thereby making them faint. This is usually done directly with offensive moves like Tackle or Scratch, although strategically-minded players will also use other moves to ail the opponent. In this battle, though, you basically have two moves due to your Pokémon's low level: an offensive move of the Normal type, and a stat-reduction move. Just focus on the damaging move for now and leave it simply at that. You won't win by necessity, but neither is a win required in this instance.


After the battle, your rival will leave. Follow suit.

There's nothing else to do here. Remember, you can go into your house and speak with your mom to heal your Pokémon to full health. When ready, go north onto Route 1.




Route 1



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Potion

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 62 All

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: There isn't much of a point to bothering with Pokémon capture at this point in time, as you do not possess Pokéballs. In fact, in the Japanese Pokémon Red/Green, having any more than one Pokémon counted as "owned" in the game would actually prevent progress if you didn't have the Pokédex! (This is caused by your starter Pokémon evolving before getting the Pokédex, by grinding on Route 1.) For now, though, I still wouldn't run from battles: EXP. is very important! Keep in mind Pidgey for future capture, though; it will be important to have a good Flying Pokémon later in the game for at least a functional use. I'd wait for Spearow personally, but to each their own.

Anyhow, there isn't much here. Go north along the route and talk to some guy on the way; you'll get a Potion. Continue north until you hit Viridian City.




Viridian City



When you arrive, head into the red-roofed building. This is the most essential
tool for all Pokémon Trainers, the Pokémon Center. Speak with the nurse at the
desk to be able to fully heal the Pokémon in your party for free. Nearby is a
PC - you can use it to access the Pokémon storage and item storage. There are
some linking things, as well, upstairs, I believe.

Anyhow, we WOULD go for the Gym here, but the Gym Leader is out somewhere.

  • sigh* Well, let's continue forward.

Let's momentarily go west onto Route 22: there's something optional, but beneficial, we can do there right now. If you don't want to do it, continue on to [[Back to Viridian City|this section]].




Route 22



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 All
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

We are only going here for a few moments. You can't go much farther here -
you'll need eight Gym Badges, for one thing, before getting to do much else.
Anyhow, there are some Pokémon here. You can grind against them for now.

Just for reference, for later... If you have Charmander, try catching a Mankey here later on. Those with Bulbasaur can catch Spearow for help with some Bug-blasting, and those with Squirtle also could use Spearow due to the Grass weakness. Spearow in general is a good Flying-type Pokémon to have, since it's stronger than the Pidgey most people will be tempted to grab, and thus will be more usable.

Anyhow, return east into Viridian.




Back to Viridian City



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Oak's Parcel

Well, we know Pewter City has a Gym (as according to this FAQ and the anime)
so why not head north to there? Well, an old man is blocking you and won't let
you by until he get's his coffee. We can't control that, so we'll just have to meander around for now.

So, what to do? Go into the blue-roofed building, the PokéMart. You normally can buy various items in here. The clerk will notice you when you enter and hand over a package that you are to deliver to Professor Oak. Leave the PokéMart and exit to the south.




Return to Pallet Town



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Pokédex [_] Town Map

Route 1: Continue south, hopping along those brown ledges as shortcuts. Continue south
into Pallet Town.

Pallet Town: Go into your house and speak with your mom to restore your starter Pokémon's health. Then go into Oak's lab. You'll end up giving Oak the package, with your rival soon coming in. You are then given the Pokédex. The Pokédex is this item that can record the data of all 151 species of Pokémon in existence - it's actually been expanded to far more than that with newer Pokémon games, 721 with the release of Pokémon X/Y in 2013. To record the data of a Pokémon in here, you must simply catch it. You can use the Pokédex to find which Pokémon you have seen and have caught, in which case you can find where they reside.

Anyhow, go outside and into your rival's house. Speak with his sister to get the Town Map, which shows the whole Kanto region. By pressing Up/Down while viewing it, the game even coincidentally tells you the general order you'll through the game's areas in. Finish up any business you have here and exit to the north.




Your Rival on Route 22



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (ROUTE 22)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 All
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

VIRIDIAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.

Route 1: Continue northward into Viridian.

Viridian City: As you can see above, the PokéMart (the building marked with "SHOP") is now selling items. You should have about $3,000 (at least, the other games do). Pick up a few extra Potions and Antidotes if you have money after buying Poké Balls. Ten ($2,000) is a good number. Anyhow, to the west on Route 22 is our current task, albeit an optional one: if you would prefer to avoid it, simply go north from Viridan onto [[Route 2 - South|southern Route 2]].

Route 22: Go through the grass to the west and you will find your rival, ready for a battle.


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $280

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charmander Fire Level 9 Bulbasaur was your starter
Squirtle Water Level 9 Charmander was your starter
Bulbasaur Grass/Poison Level 9 Squirtle was your starter
Pidgey Normal/Flying Level 9 None

  • Charmander is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It by now knows Ember, a Fire-type move.

  • Squirtle is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water Gun, a Water move.

  • Bulbasaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It should know Vine Whip by know, a Grass move.

  • Pidgey is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, with a Ground immunity.

In this battle, your starter will not fare particularly well against your foe's starter, mostly due to the type advantage they have. By this point, having caught a secondary Pokémon is a very good idea to counter them. None of the starters have a particularly decent counter for the moment, except Bulbasaur who Pidgey or Spearow with a Flying move will do very well against. Pidgey can be easily handled by your own starter, with a neutral-damage move in the case of Bulbasaur (others using same-type-as-user moves for 50% more damage), or Pikachu from Viridian Forest not far from here will work. Overall, though, it's not particularly difficult: if you find it hard, you don't need to do this battle anyways.




Route 2 - South



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Potion

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (ROUTE 2)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 20 45 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

VIRIDIAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.

Viridian City: Once you're done with the battle on Route 22, if desired, return to Viridian City and heal up and stock up. Head north of the town and, on the way, you'll find the man west of the Gym who was blocking you earlier. He will explain how to capture Pokémon if you need to learn. Essentially, the goal is to get the Pokémon's HP as low as possible, then throw a Pokéball at it. Certain Pokéballs are more effective than others, and adding ailments to Pokémon will further aid in their capture; however, you can't capture a KO'd Pokémon, so be careful about that!

To the west of there, there will be a narrow forest path, with a tree blocking you. As you may know, this is a tree that can be Cut down with the Cut HM, although we won't have that for a while. However, press A while facing it to get a Potion! Then go north to Route 2.

Route 2 (South): Route 2 is a pretty easy-to-navigate Route: you shouldn't have much trouble walking northward into Viridian Forest. There's nothing of note on the way; even most of the Pokémon. You may want to consider getting a Caterpie, though; Bug Pokémon tend to evolve at very low levels, and they also are commonly able to learn status moves like Stun Spore that would aid in the capture of Pokémon. Anyhow, to the forest.




Viridian Forest



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Antidote [_] Poké Ball [_] Potion

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 20 45 All
Kakuna Bug/Poison 45 25 50 25 35 All
Metapod Bug 50 20 55 25 30 All
Pikachu Electric 35 55 30 50 90 All
Weedle Bug/Poison 40 35 30 20 50 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Weedle Lv. 6, Caterpie Lv. 6
#2 - Red Weedle Lv. 7, Weedle Lv. 7, Kakuna Lv. 7
#2 - Blue/Green Caterpie Lv. 2, Caterpie Lv. 2, Metapod Lv. 7
#3 - Red Weedle Lv. 9
#3 - Blue/Green Caterpie Lv. 9

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Statistically-speaking, there aren't a lot of Pokémon good here other than completion purposes. Pikachu is a decent one to grab since Electric Pokémon are relatively rare, and Pikachu is a decent one. Plus, it's cute. I'd also recommend grabbing Caterpie since it'll become Butterfree by Level 10, and Bug Pokémon in general easily get status moves that aid in Pokémon capture, since statuses boost the catching rate.

Once you enter, go north and west to find a Poké Ball. Go back east and south to the entrance, then further east and north to find a Trainer, with another to the north. Further north of the second Trainer is an ''Antidote';, an item that heals the Poison status, which can damage, and Weedle's Poison Sting - found commonly here - can Poison you. Anyhow, go east and then north to find another Trainer. Go west some more and speak with the person you find to battle him, too.

Continue along the pathway and you'll soon find a fork in the road. Go east on it to find a Potion. Then return to the fork, head west, and battle the last Trainer of the forest. Head north to go to the gate, go on through, and you will find Route 2 again.




Route 2 - North



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 20 45 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

Simply go north some more to Pewter City - there's nothing here, for now anyhow.



Pewter City



PEWTER CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Escape Rope $550 Allows you to instantly escape natural dungeons, like caves.

When you arrive, head on over to the Pokémon Center and heal up. Other than that, really, there's nothing else of import to mention here. Go to the Gym. If you don't know what it looks like, try to exit Pewter by heading east onto Route 3. You'll then be escorted
to the Gym.



Pewter City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] BoulderBadge [_] TM34 (Bide)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Diglett Lv. 11, Sandshrew Lv. 11

This is a very straightforward Gym. Go forward to battle the Trainer: you can walk around him, but it's free EXP. and money. After beating him,
you may want to head back to the Pokémon Center and heal. When ready, speak to
and challenge Brock.

BOSS: Gym Leader Brock

  • Rewards: $1,386, BoulderBadge, TM34 (Bide)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Geodude Rock/Ground Level 12 None
Onix Rock/Ground Level 14 None

In terms of type data, both of these Pokémon are rather the same, and even seem to have similar movesets. Rock/Ground Pokémon have double-weaknesses to both Grass and Water, and also are weak to Ice and Fighting. They are immune to Electric and advantageous over Fire, Bug, Poison, Rock, Ice, and Electric. Despite this latter fact, the main damaging move you'll see from either is Tackle, and Onix may use Bide, which will do double the damage you give to it over two turns, two turns it should not survive anyways.

In terms of strategy, you shouldn't have much trouble; you can consider the battle won if you have Squirtle or Bulbasaur, or even one of their evolutions. Those with Charmander are less well-off, and don't have much of a choice in good battle partners, except perhaps Mankey from Red's Route 22. Grinding will likely be the best thing you otherwise can do.


After the battle, you will be granted your first Gym Badge, the BoulderBadge. Brock will also hand you TM34, which teaches Bide, a move his Onix used in the battle. So, 'grats on one of eight.


CascadeBadge



Sectional Flowchart






Route 3



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (ROUTE 3)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Jigglypuff Normal 115 45 20 25 20 All
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON (ROUTE 3)
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All [none - $500] Magikarp Water

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON (ROUTE 3)
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Pidgey Lv. 9, Pidgey Lv. 9
#2 Caterpie Lv. 10, Caterpie Lv. 10, Weedle Lv. 10
#3 Rattata Lv. 11, Ekans Lv. 11
#4 Weedle Lv. 9, Kakuna Lv. 9, Caterpie Lv. 9, Metapod Lv. 9
#5 Spearow Lv. 14
#6 Rattata Lv. 10, Nidoran Lv. 10
#7 Caterpie Lv. 11, Metapod Lv. 11
#8 Jigglypuff Lv. 14

Pewter City: Once you've obtained the BoulderBadge, there is little point in sticking around. Heal in the Pokémon Center, restock at the PokéMart if needed, and head east onto Route 3.

Route 3: In terms of Pokémon, Route 3 doesn't offer a ton that would be considered new or good. Spearow and/or Pidgey would be good to get if you haven't gotten them yet. The Magikarp you can buy for $500 near the end of the Route is also good, since Gyarados is a pretty nasty Pokémon: to get the rather-useless Magikarp to evolve, though, you'll need to put it in battle and switch it out so it'll gain EXP.

Go east onto the Route and you'll see some Trainers in the near vicinity. Go east and defeat the Lass, then go north to find a Bug Catcher. Go west to find a Youngster. Defeat him and continue to the right to find another Lass and another Bug Catcher. Hop down south to find another Youngster, then go down and around to the right to find a Bug Catcher. Then go along the Route to the patch of grass. Defeat the lass to the east.

Ah, grass! That green plant filled with chlorophyll, having a mystical quality in Pokémon. =/ All weird talking aside, you'll want to note Jigglypuff for you can't get it anywhere else in Pokémon Red/Blue. Other than the Pokédex, its Sing attack helps to catch Pokémon and it's a bit of an HM slave.

Eventually, head north to find a Pokémon Center. Heal up there and also note the man inside who will sell Magikarp for $500. While Magikarp is iconic for being more useless than fire underwater, its evolution, Gyarados, is like its polar opposite. It's also easy to catch later on, but if you like go to the trouble, here ya go. You should have raised $1,170 fighting those Trainers.

Once you're done, head east into Mt. Moon.




Mt. Moon



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Escape Rope [_] Ether [_] HP Up [_] Moon Stone [_] Moon Stone [_] Potion [_] Potion
[_] Rare Candy [_] TM01 (Mega Punch) [_] TM12 (Water Gun)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Clefairy Normal 70 45 48 60 35 All
Geodude Rock/Ground 40 80 100 30 20 All
Paras Bug/Grass 35 70 55 55 25 All
Zubat Poison/Flying 40 45 35 40 55 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Weedle Lv. 11, Kakuna Lv. 11
#2 Clefairy Lv. 14
#3 Magnemite Lv. 11, Voltorb Lv. 11
#4 Caterpie Lv. 10, Caterpie Lv. 10, Metapod Lv. 10
#5 Oddish Lv. 11, Bellsprout Lv. 11
#6 Rattata Lv. 10, Ratta Lv. 10, Zubat Lv. 10
#7 Geodude Lv. 10, Onix Lv. 10, Geodude Lv. 10
#8 Grimer Lv. 12, Koffing Lv. 12, Voltorb Lv. 12
Grunt #1 Sandshrew Lv. 11, Zubat Lv. 11, Rattata Lv. 11
Grunt #2 Zubat Lv. 11, Ekans Lv. 11
Grunt #3 Raticate Lv. 16
Grunt #4 Rattata Lv. 13, Zubat Lv. 13

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Nothing of real note. >_>

Mt. Moon - 1F: When you enter, head north and defeat the Lass. Then go west and north to the Bug Catcher. Head northwest after the fight to find a Potion, then go south from there to find TM12, which teaches Water Gun. Go east to the Lass you beat earlier, then head northeast. You'll notice a ladder; use it.

Mt. Moon - B1F: Down on B1F, you'll want to go along the path for a bit to find another ladder. Use it.

Mt. Moon - B2F: Nearby, you'll find another new class of Pokémon trainer, and perhaps the worst as far as ethics go: the Team Rocket Grunt. You'll understand their vile nature later in the game. Defeat him and go east. On the raised ledge, you can find an HP Up. Sweet; these cost almost $10,000 in this game! And for good reason: they boost your Pokémon's HP Stat Experience by 2560, which is a little udner 4% of the max. Stat EXP. is accumulated through battling, so you see my point?

Go back upstairs to 1F.

Mt. Moon - 1F: You'll notice a fork in the path. Go south, first. Defeat the Super Nerd and go southwest to find another Potion. Go around that big rock to find another Bug Catcher, then go southeast to find the rare Rare Candy. These items are perhaps the best you can find: not buyable by any means, and there's a very limited amount in the game, and for good reason: they instantly raise your Pokémon's level by one! I think it might be most efficient to use one after leveling up, because your EXP. drains out after its use.

Go north to find an Escape Rope, which will let you instantly leave a cave and some other areas like this one. Further north, you'll find a Lass. Defeat her and go west and south to the ladder series.

Mt. Moon - B2F: Defeat the nearby Rocket grunt and go north to find TM01, which teaches Mega Punch. It's a Normal-type move of decent physical power. Go east and examine the stand-out rock to find an Ether, which helps to heal PP. You usually can't buy these, so save them for emergencies.

Go back to the top floor.

Mt. Moon - 1F: Go west to find a Youngster. Defeat him and go north to find the Hiker. Defeat him and you'll notice a ladder. Don't yet use it; rather, go northwest to find a Moon Stone. Only four Pokémon in this game will evolve via the Moon Stone: Jigglypuff (into Wigglytuff), Clefairy (into Clefable), Nidorino (into Nidoking), and Nidorina (into Nidoqueen). There is one for each of them in this game, this being one of them. Take the ladder to the southeast down a floor.

Mt. Moon - B1F: Defeat the Rocket here. After, go along the path east, south, west, and north. At the end, you'll need to fight another Rocket. Go north some more and go along the narrow eastbound path. At the end, examine with A to find a second Moon Stone! Go north and fight the Super Nerd near the two fossils. After the fight, you'll get a choice of the two fossils. Each of the Pokémon will be pretty similar. Pick one: the Dome Fossil will revive the offense-oriented Kabuto, whereas the Helix Fossil revives the defensive Omanyte.

Anywho, after this, continue along the path and past two ladders to leave this place.




Route 4



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Ekans Poison 35 60 44 40 55 Red
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 30 40 Blue/Green
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: There's not much to Route 4. You'll notice there are some version-only Pokémon
here. Ekans is a quaint, mildly useful Poison-type, and found pretty rarely in
Pokémon Red; as for Pokémon Blue/Green, I value Sandshrew over Ekans because of
its versatility, ability to be a HM slave, and it keeps most of Geodude's (a
typical preference) strengths while lessening up on the weaknesses.

Anyways, continue eastward into Cerulean. There's not much on the way, though.




Cerulean City


TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Rare Candy

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Poliwhirl Jynx Ice/Psychic

CERULEAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Repel $350 Prevents wild Pokémon encounters for 100 steps.

When you arrive, head on over to the Pokémon Center and heal up. Visit the
PokéMart next, if you want. You will find a new item, the Repel. It helps to
keep Pokémon off of you. Personally, it's useless because you should be WANTING
EXP., not avoiding it. Though I guess low-level players might enjoy it.

Anyhow, go into the house west of the Pokémon Center and, in there, you'll be able to trade a Poliwhirl for Jynx. That's sad. Why? Well, firstly, you likely don't have that. Secondly, Jynx is the greater of two evils here, to me. And third? In Pokémon Yellow, you actually get a Bulbasaur FOR FREE here. >_<

In the northwestern house, you'll find a man who informs you of all of the badges' properties. Go around back of his house and examine all of the tiles there to find a Rare Candy near the east side.

Leave here and go south to find a shop. The man inside will sell you a Bicycle for the low, low prices of a mere $1,000,000! ... You know you can't afford that. For two reasons: firstly, you will need some insane grinding or trading for that much money, and secondly, you can only have $999,999. (This amount was later made much higher by Black/White - I think it was $999,999,999.) Despite this fact, kept this shop noted for future perusal.

Oh well. Let's head into the Gym. If you prefer to do some grinding beforehand, you should look at Routes 24 & 25 to the north of Cerulean. It's not optional at all, but you don't have to do it before the Gym, or you can if you want.




Cerulean City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] CascadgeBadge [_] TM11 (Bubblebeam)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Horsea Lv. 16, Shellder Lv. 16
#2 Goldeen Lv. 19

Okay, go forward and defeat the Trainers. One is optional (the Horsea/Shellder
Trainer), but he is easy enough so you might as well bother with him. Anyhow, when you're done with them, leave,
heal, and return. Speak with and battle Misty.

BOSS: Gym Leader Misty

  • Rewards: $2,079; CascadeBadge; TM11 (Bubblebeam)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Staryu Water Level 18 None
Starmie Water/Psychic Level 21 None

Both of these Pokémon are rather similar, although Starmie is much stronger. Both Pokémon are weak to Grass and Electric, with Starmie also being weak to Bug and Ghost. They both mostly stick to Water moves, which will easily wipe out Fire, Rock, and/or Groudn Pokémon.

In terms of strategy, bringing along Grass or Electric Pokémon would be ideal. There's obviously the Bulbasaur you could've gotten as a starter, though there's also Pikachu from Viridian Forest and Oddish and Bellsprout from the areas north of Cerulean. They're all pretty decent for this battle.


After the battle, you will obtain the CascadeBadge, your second Gym Badge, which also has the added benefit of allowing you to use the HM Cut outside of battle. You'll also gain TM11, which teaches a semi-decent Water-type move in Bubblebeam.


ThunderBadge



Sectional Flowchart






Routes 24 & 25



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Nugget [_] Nugget [_] TM45 (Thunder Wave) [_] S.S. Ticket [_] TM19 (Seismic Toss)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON (CERULEAN CITY)
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Poliwhirl Jynx Ice/Psychic

CERULEAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Repel $350 Prevents wild Pokémon encounters for 100 steps.

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (ROUTES 24/25)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Abra Psychic 25 20 15 105 90 All
Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 70 40 Blue/Green
Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 20 45 All
Kakuna Bug/Poison 45 25 50 25 35 All
Metapod Bug 50 20 55 25 30 All
Oddish Grass/Poison 45 50 55 75 30 Red
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All
Weedle Bug/Poison 40 35 30 20 50 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON (ROUTES 24/25)
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Caterpie Lv. 14, Weedle Lv. 14
#2 Pidgey Lv. 14, Nidoran Lv. 14
#3 Rattata Lv. 14, Ekans Lv. 14, Zubat Lv. 14
#4 Pidgey Lv. 16, Nidoran Lv. 16
#5 Mankey Lv. 18
#6 Ekans Lv. 15, Zubat Lv. 15
#7 Rattata Lv. 14, Ekans Lv. 14
#8 Machop Lv. 15, Geodude Lv. 15
#9 Onix Lv. 17
#10 Rattata Lv. 15, Spearow Lv. 15
#11 Slowpoke Lv. 17
#12 Nidoran Lv. 15, Nidoran Lv. 15
#13 Geodude Lv. 13, Geodude Lv. 13, Geodude Lv. 13, Machop Lv. 13
#14 Rattata Lv. 14, Ekans Lv. 14
#15 Ekans Lv. 14, Sandshrew Lv. 14
#16 Oddish Lv. 13, Oddish Lv. 13, Pidgey Lv. 13

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: On Routes 24 and 25, there are some decent Pokémon. If you haven't beaten the Cerulean Gym yet, Bellsprout and Oddish, while not particularly amazing Grass Pokémon compared to the majority, will sate you if you need one for the Cerulean Gym. I'd personally pick Pikachu for that role, but to each their own. Abra is perhaps the best feature here. Initially, he's a lot like Magikarp: to make him useful by evolving him, you'll basically have to lead your party with him and then switch him out first thing so he gains at least some EXP., but he's one of the best Special-stat Pokémon in Red/Blue/Green that you can get. And decent Psychic Pokémon in this game are very rare.

Cerulean City: Once you leave, heal up your Pokémon and try going north out of Cerulean. When you do, you'll find and battle your rival.


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $595

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charmander Fire Level 17 Bulbasaur was your starter
Squirtle Water Level 17 Charmander was your starter
Bulbasaur Grass/Poison Level 17 Squirtle was your starter
Pidgeotto Normal/Flying Level 19 None
Abra Psychic Level 15 None
Rattata Normal Level 15 None

  • Charmander is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It by now knows Ember, a Fire-type move.

  • Squirtle is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water Gun, a Water move.

  • Bulbasaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It should know Vine Whip by know, a Grass move.

  • Pidgeotto is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground.

  • Abra is weak to Bug and Ghost.

  • Rattata is weak to Fighting.

Geodude/Graveler would be decent in this battle for countering both Pidgeotto and Charmander, while the Pokémon you used in the Cerulean Gym (Pikachu or a Grass Pokémon) would be best for Squirtle and your Flying Pokémon for Bulbasaur. Abra and Rattata can easily be taken out by your starter Pokémon - especially Abra, since it can't attack.


After defeating your rival, you'll see him leave. Heal up back in Cerulean,
then go north to the Nugget Bridge.

Route 24: Okay, when you enter the Bridge area, the general idea is to first fight five Trainers of increasing difficulty. You should be able to go to the Pokémon Center and heal in-between battles as needed. At the end, you'll be given a Nugget and an offer to join Team Rocket. (Of course, this is a Team Rocket grunt.) Your character refuses the offer (hey, I wanted to say "Yes" =/), so you have to fight, correct? Do so. Once you're done here, return to Cerulean, heal up, and continue north onto Route 24 proper.

While in the grass to the west of that Trainer-filled area (the Nugget Bridge), defeat the Trainer. Return to the northern end of the Nugget Bridge and go northwest to find TM45, Thunder Wave, an Electric-type move that doesn't damage, but actually will induce Paralysis should it hit. Paralysis makes it so that the opponent has a 1/4 chance of not attacking, and it also halves their Speed stat, often ensuring that they go last regardless of their Speed beforehand, especially in the competitive setting.

Then go east, and battle the two Hikers. After that, you should be on Route 25.

Route 25: Continue along the Route to battle the first four Trainers above. After defeating the Hiker, you should go north and HAVE THE TRAINER TO THE NORTH WALK TO YOU. This is so you can obtain TM19, Seismic Toss. Anyhow, your next opponents, including the aforementioned Trainer, should be a Jr. Trainer and a Youngster. After defeating the Youngster, continue along the path to find a Lass. Defeat her.

Continue along the path to find a house. Go inside to find something that looks a bit like a Pokémon. The "Pokémon" reveals itself to be Bill, among the biggest of the biggest Pokémaniacs and the creator of the PC Pokémon Storage System. One of his experiments has transformed him into a Pokémon. You'll be forced to help out. When Bill enters the chamber, press A while facing the computer keyboard to transform Bill into a human being. He'll hand you the S.S. Ticket as a reward. Now leave the house and continue back to Cerulean City.




Route 5



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM28 (Dig)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All (Cerulean) Poliwhirl Jynx Ice/Psychic
Blue/Green (Route 5) Nidoran Nidoran Poison
Red (Route 5) Nidoran Nidoran Poison

CERULEAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Repel $350 Prevents wild Pokémon encounters for 100 steps.

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (ROUTE 5)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 70 40 Blue/Green
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Meowth Normal 40 45 35 40 90 Blue/Green
Oddish Grass/Poison 45 50 55 75 30 Red
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON (CERULEAN)
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Machop Lv. 17, Drowzee Lv. 17

Cerulean City: Heal up at the Pokémon Center and buy some items as needed. In the northeastern
bit of town, you'll remember a house being guarded by a police officer from
before. He's failed to do his job because, as you can quite see when inside, a
Team Rocket grunt ended up taking TM28 (Dig) from here! Leave via the back door
and beat 'im good.

After the battle, you'll be given TM28, Dig. Dig is a very decent Ground-type move. It puts the user underground for one turn, and will only be damaged by Earthquake and the like during that time, then deals Ground-type damage on the next turn. The people who originally had the TM taken from them will let you have it, so enjoy. Also note that it is a bit like an Escape Rope when used out of battle.

Continue southward to Route 5.

Route 5: Not much here, Pokémon-wise.

Further along the Route, you find you cannot go east - there is a tree in the way. Okay, south it is. You'll be able to jump the ledges. Do so to find the Pokémon Daycare, where you leave one of your Pokémon. By doing so, the Pokémon will gain 1 EXP. per step you taken. However, the moveset changes are not controlled by you, and you must pay $100 + ($100 X number of levels gained). So... Magikarp...? (Note, however, like Gen. II onwards, no breeding is allowed in these games.)

Further south, you cannot go into Saffron City because the guard is thirsty and will be a complete douche about it.

There is only one option left - taking the underground pathway connecting Route 5 with Route 6. Go into that building. Speak with the girl for a version-specific trade. You'll receive Nidoran for Nidoran in Pokémon Blue/Green, and vice versa in Pokémon Red.

When you're done, go on downstairs and follow the linear path, and exit the building to find Route 6.




Route 6



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 70 40 Blue/Green
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Meowth Normal 40 45 35 40 90 Blue/Green
Metapod Bug 50 20 55 25 30 All
Oddish Grass/Poison 45 50 55 75 30 Red
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Weedle Lv. 16, Weedle Lv. 16, Caterpie Lv. 16
#2 Squirtle Lv. 20
#3 Rattata Lv. 16, Pikachu Lv. 16
#4 Butterfree Lv. 20
#5 Pidgey Lv. 16, Pidgey Lv. 16, Pidgey Lv. 16
#6 Spearow Lv. 16, Raticate Lv. 16

So then, upon exiting from the Underground Path, go to the west and beat up the
Bug Catcher, then go southeast for two Jr. Trainers. Further southeast will be
a Bug Catcher, again. Then head southwest to find the final trainers of this
route, coincidentally a pair of Jr. Trainers. Go south to find Vermilion.



Vermilion City



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Bicycle [_] Bike Voucher [_] Old Rod

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Spearow Farfetch'd Normal/Flying

VERMILION CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Super Potion $700 Heal 50 HP to a single Pokémon.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Repel $350 Prevents wild Pokémon encounters for 100 steps.

You will be able to find a new item, the Super Potion, in the PokéMart now. This item 
heals 50 points of HP (heals 2.5x more than the Potion; costs 2.3x more), so it's a bit more efficient than Potions.

After arriving, head on into the Pokémon Center and speak with the nurse behind the counter to heal yourself. Leave the Pokémon Center and go into the house on the left. Speak with the man inside and say "Yes" to get the Old Rod. In the ever-famous words of another GameFAQs user, AstralFire, "Great. A Magikarp stick." Couldn't have put it better. That's all the Old Rod can do, as far as I know - catch Magikarp.

Leave the house and go east, then south, then to the far west to find the Pokémon Fan Club. One guy inside mentions something along the lines of his Pikachu being cuter than that one ... where is this "that one"? There isn't another in the building. @_@ Anyhow, speak with the old man and say "Yes" and you will eventually obtain a Bike Voucher, which allows you to obtain a free Bicycle if you go to the Bike Shop back in Cerulean City and give it to the man at the counter.

Okay, after the trip, heal up if needed at the Pokémon Center. Go back to the Pokémon Fan Club and into the building to the east. Inside, you can speak with a girl that will give you a Farfetch'd (a Normal/Flying-type) for a Spearow (also a Normal/Flying type). You should remember that a Farfetch'd cannot be caught anywhere in the Kanto region (guess she got hers from Johto?), so this will be the only way to get it. Farfetch'd - due to the lack of hold items - is not that much worth using, but may as well grab it for completionism. =/

Next, let's go to the harbor, where the S.S. Anne is docked.




The S.S. Anne



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Ether [_] HM01 (Cut) [_] Great Ball [_] Max Ether [_] Max Potion [_] Rare Candy
[_] TM08 (Body Slam) [_] TM44 (Rest)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Shellder Lv. 21
#2 Horsea Lv. 17, Tentacool Lv. 17, Shellder Lv. 17
#3 Horsea Lv. 17, Horsea Lv. 17, Horsea Lv. 17
#4 Tentacool Lv. 18, Staryu Lv. 18
#5 Machop Lv. 20
#6 Tentacool Lv. 17, Shellder Lv. 17, Staryu Lv. 17
#7 Growlithe Lv. 18, Growlithe LV. 19
#8 Nidoran Lv. 19, Nidoran Lv. 19
#9 Pidgey Lv. 18, Nidoran Lv. 18
#10 Nidoran Lv. 21, Nidoran Lv. 21
#11 Machop Lv. 17, Tentacool Lv. 17
#12 Machop Lv. 18, Shellder Lv. 18
#13 Goldeen Lv. 17, Goldeen Lv. 17, Tentacool Lv. 17
#14 Pikachu Lv. 23
#15 Growlithe Lv. 17, Ponyta Lv. 17
#16 Rattata Lv. 18, Pikachu Lv. 18

First, go south and east and through the door. Defeat the Gentleman within and
leave. Go southeast and downstairs. Go through the door at the left and get
the Max Potion. The next room to the left has two Sailors to battle. Go left
one more room to another Sailor, as well as an ether. Continue left for a
fourth Sailor fight and TM44. TM44 teaches Rest, which is a move that puts your
Pokémon to sleep and heals their HP, waking up exactly two turns later.

Go left one more room to find two more Trainers to fight. Afterwards, head back east and upstairs, then go back to below the entrance. Go southeast of there to fight another Gentleman past the door. Go left three doors and inside, then beat the two Trainers within. Also grab the item, which is TM08. TM08 teaches Body Slam, a fairly powerful Normal-type attack that has a good chance of also inducing Paralysis on the Pokémon it hits.

Continue left some more outside. At the west wall, go down past the stairs to fidn the kitchen. Go to the east side of this room where the chefs are peeling some 'taters and examine the southernmost trash basket to find a Great Ball, which has a 50% greater chance of catching a Pokémon than the basic Poké Ball.

Leave the kitchen and go north and downstairs. Go south and downstairs again, then to the far west side to hit the deck, metaphorically of course. Defeat the two Trainers here, then go back into the ship and to where you entered this floor.

Go through the first room on the right and you'll be shown a picture of a fat Pokémon, Snorlax, by one of the trainers within. Next room: two Trainers and the useful Max Ether. Two rooms later: two more battles and a Rare Candy!

Now, I suggest you leave the ship and heal up at the Pokémon Center. Return and continue along the path you were going along to find your rival! He brags briefly about having caught 40 Pokémon by now before battling you.


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $1,300

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charmeleon Fire Level 20 Bulbasaur was your starter
Wartortle Water Level 20 Charmander was your starter
Ivysaur Grass/Poison Level 20 Squirtle was your starter
Pidgeotto Normal/Flying Level 19 None
Kadabra Psychic Level 18 None
Raticate Normal Level 16 None

  • Charmeleon is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It knows Fire moves, and thus can really hurt Grass, Ice, and Bug Pokémon.

  • Wartortle is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water moves, and thus is going to hurt Fire, Rock, and Ground moves.

  • Ivysaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It'll know Grass moves by now, so avoid using Ground, Water, and Rock Pokémon.

  • Pidgeotto is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground. Avoid using Fighting, Bug, and Grass Pokémon here.

  • Kadabra is weak to Bug and Ghost. It'll have advantages over Poison and Fighting Pokémon.

  • Raticate is weak to Fighting.

Looks like your rival finally had the time to make their starter evolve! (And also hack the game, since it's not possible for Raticate be Level 16. >_>) The same general rules for this battle apply as they did in the Cerulean battle: Graveler works well on Charmeleon and Pidgeotto, Spearow/Fearow/Pidgey/Pigeotto on Bulbasaur, Pikachu or another Grass Pokémon on Wartortle, and your starter for Kadabra and Raticate. You should be working around Level 21~23 by now.


After winning, your rival leaves. Continue and you'll find a man near a trash
can. You will end up giving the old man a back massage to comfort his seasickness, which is odd given he is the ship's captain: shouldn't be used to this? He rewards you with
HM01 (Cut) regardless. Cut is a particularly weak Normal-type move. Using up a useful move slot for a
weak move isn't a good idea... Eh, I simply made a Sandshrew my HM slave and
moved on. You'll need to use Cut to be able to get through the game, after all, and it's usable in the field, as you do have the CascadeBadge.

Okay, anyhow, exit the S.S. Anne.




Vermilion City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] ThunderBadge [_] TM24 (Thunderbolt)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Pikachu Lv. 21, Pikachu Lv. 21
#2 Voltorb Lv. 20, Voltorb Lv. 20, Magnemite Lv. 20
#3 Pikachu Lv. 23

Vermilion City: With the Cut HM in-hand, it's time to challenge the Vermilion City Gym. Heal up in the Pokémon Center, then head to the southwestern portion of the city to Cut down the tree. (Farfetch'd, by the way, can learn Cut if you don't have a Pokémon that can.) Go inside.

Vermilion Gym: Within the Pokémon Gym, there are three people in the front room of the building. Go ahead and battle all of them, and they will give you hints as to the puzzle to reach Lt. Surge. See, there are a ton of trash cans throughout the room, and in one at random is a hidden switch: you must investigate the trash cans to find it. That alone is not enough to open the northern door to Lt. Surge: you must also find the second switch. The second switch is supposed to be in a trash can next to the first switch going horizontally or vertically, but not diagonally. This is normally true but, although this same reference is made in the Japanese Pokémon Red/Green, the second switch in those games could be in any of the trash cans, which makes this task a pain in the ass without save-state abuse. >_>

Eventually, you'll get it right. Continue north to find, speak to, and battle Lt. Surge.


BOSS: Gym Leader Lt. Surge

  • Rewards: $2,376; ThunderBadge; TM24 (Thunderbolt)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Voltorb Electric Level 21 None
Pikachu Electric Level 18 None
Raichu Electric Level 24 None

For most of the Pokémon series up until Pokémon Black/White, really, most Electric-type Pokémon are the same and share similar movesets and the like. Electric Pokémon have a lone, niche weakness (Ground) while also having a niche set of advantages (Water, Flying). Most Electric Pokémon, these included, do not tend to be powerful, but they can lethally status you, often with Paralysis via Thunder Wave as it does halve your Speed and make it where you cannot attack 1/4 of the time.

In this battle, having gone to Diglett's Cave to the east of Vermilion before the battle would have been ideal, for Diglett and Dugtrio, as well as other Ground Pokémon like Nidoking, Nidoqueen, Sandshrew, and Sandslash, will be immune to Electric moves since Electric does no damage to Ground Pokémon, and then Ground moves also do double damage to Electric Pokémon. Grass Pokémon would be a second-best, since they still take half-damage from Electric as well. But it's overall pretty easy.


After winning, you'll get the ThunderBadge and TM24. This teaches Thunderbolt,
one of the best Electric moves in the game. It's personally my favorite, for
it balances power with accuracy. Of course, Thunder is more powerful by about
25%, but also has about 30% less accuracy.


RainbowBadge



Sectional Flowchart



We'll be opening our quest towards our fourth Gym Badge with an item-gathering sidequest based on our new availability of the move Cut and the ability to use it in the field. If you would like to deal with this, go for the first section listed here; otherwise, head for Route 11, or even Route 9 since Route 11 is itself optional.




Cut Item Cleanup: Diglett's Cave



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Diglett Ground 10 55 25 45 95 All
Dugtrio Ground 35 80 50 70 120 All

Diglett's Cave is found to the east of Viridian City. After having gotten the ThunderBadge from the Gym, heal up in the Pokémon Center then head far to the east of the Gym: a cave will open up to the north. Go inside to find a long, winding, linear path: its main feature are prominent amounts of Diglett and Dugtrio, some decent Ground Pokémon often known for their relative Speed. Anyhow, there's not much, but ascend to northern Route 2 at the end of the path.



Cut Item Cleanup: Route 2



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] HM05 (Flash) [_] HP Up [_] Moon Stone

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Abra Mr. Mime Psychic

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 20 45 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

When you arrive, go south and into the house to find a boy inside. Speak with
him to receive Mr. Mime for an Abra. I only mentioned this for completion --
honestly, I would prefer you stick with Abra. Of course, Mr. Mime can only be
gotten this way (or trading), so I guess you'll probably be backtracking to
Route 24/25, eh?

Anyhow, exit, go south, and Cut down the tree. Enter the nearby building. In there is another one of Prof. Oak's aides. If you have caught 10+ Pokémon species, you will get HM05, Flash.

Flash is a move that will lower the opponents' accuracy by one stage in battle. Out of battle, it will light up caverns and such that are too dark. For example, Mt. Moon and Diglett's Cave are NOT Flash-able places: the Rock Tunnel we'll later go through almost requires its use. You can place it on Abra or Bellsprout, as well as some other Grass and Psychic Pokémon, to my knowledge. It is by no means a requirement for game completion like most HMs, but you'll want it if you don't plan on using a map of some sort.

Leave the building, heading south, and grab the HP Up. Keep going south to find a Moon Stone. Then return north to the Diglett's Cave entrance. Go west and Cut down the tree, then go north into Pewter City.




Cut Item Cleanup: Pewter City



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Old Amber

PEWTER CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Escape Rope $550 Allows you to instantly escape natural dungeons, like caves.

Heal up at the Pokémon Center if needed, then head to the northeastern corner
of the city. Cut down the tree, then go into the Museum.

Inside, the top-center man will give you an Old Amber to take to a Pokémon Lab. Let's hold onto it, for we can later transform it, like the Dome/Helix Fossil, into a Pokémon. This one is Aerodactyl, a Rock/Flying Pokémon. Aerodactyl is a more-than-decent Pokémon, boasting both good Attack and Speed: even today, Aerodactyl is fairly commonly used in battles.

Now, we're now going to backtrack to Viridian City for a quick thing. Nothing major. Head south onto Route 2, then go far to the south of where you got HM05, where the HP Up and Moon Stone were found earlier. You can Cut down some trees near there and go south to Viridian.




Cut Item Cleanup: Viridian City



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM42 (Dream Eater)

VIRIDIAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.

Now, go to the Cut tree near the water. Cut it down and grab the item there,
TM42. TM42 teaches Dream Eater, a move that induces damage on Sleeping Pokémon
and let's the user absorb some HP as well. This is best coupled on Psychic Pokémon who also know the move Hypnosis; that is, if you plan on using it. Frankly, Hypnosis is barely more than 50% accurate, so I wouldn't rely on it too much. >_>

We're done with the Cut-based item cleanup thingy for now, though. Backtrack to Vermilion City and go east onto Route 11.




Route 11



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Awakening [_] Escape Rope [_] Itemfinder

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
Red Nidorino Nidorina Poison
Blue/Green Nidorina Nidorino Poison

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Drowzee Psychic 60 48 45 90 42 All
Ekans Poison 35 60 44 40 55 Red
Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 30 40 Blue/Green
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Ekans Lv. 21
#2 Sandshrew Lv. 19, Zubat Lv. 19
#3 Magnemite Lv. 21
#4 Growlithe Lv. 18, Vulpix Lv. 18
#5 Rattata Lv. 17, Rattata Lv. 17, Raticate Lv. 17
#6 Voltorb Lv. 18, Magnemite Lv. 18
#7 Bellsprout Lv. 18, Oddish Lv. 18
#8 Nidoran Lv. 18, Nidorino Lv. 18
#9 Magnemite Lv. 18, Magnemite Lv. 18, Magneton Lv. 18
#10 Poliwag Lv. 18, Horsea Lv. 18

So, east of the Vermilion entrance to Diglett's Cave, you'll find Route 11. Go
north to find an Awakening. Go along the northern path and you'll find four
Trainers. After beating the last Trainer, go to the alcove north of the gatehouse and examine the standalone tree there for an Escape Rope. Then go into the nearby building and 
upstairs to find another trade: in Pokémon Red, you'll get Nidorina for
Nidorino, and vice versa in Pokémon Blue/Green.

Also up here is one of Prof. Oak's aides. He'll give you the Itemfinder, but only if you've caught 30+ species of Pokémon. The Itemfinder simply allows you to find hidden items.

Leave the building heading east to find a ... thing ... in the middle of the road. This "thing" is a Pokémon known as Snorlax and is among the heaviest of Pokémon, weighing in at just over one-half imperial ton in weight (just under one-half metric ton). You cannot wake up the sleeping Pokémon (don't have a Poké Flute), nor eject it somehow into the nearby ocean (don't own enough uranium). Well, return to the main part of Route 11 and defeat the southern trainers. You'll fight two, then defeat the last three Trainers. Return to Vermilion.




Route 9



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM30 (Teleport)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Ekans Poison 35 60 44 40 55 Red
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 30 40 Blue/Green
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Bellsprout Lv. 18, Bellsprout Lv. 18, Oddish Lv. 18, Oddish Lv. 18
#2 Machop Lv. 20, Onix Lv. 20
#3 Growlithe Lv. 21, Charmander Lv. 21
#4 Beedrill Lv. 19, Beedrill Lv. 19
#5 Geodude Lv. 21, Onix Lv. 21
#6 Caterpie Lv. 20, Weedle Lv. 20, Venonat Lv. 20
#7 Rattata Lv. 19, Ekans Lv. 19, Sandshrew Lv. 19, Digglet Lv. 19
#8 Geodude Lv. 20, Geodude Lv. 20, Machop Lv. 20
#9 Meowth Lv. 23

Vermilion City: When you've returned to Vermilion City, go north from there onto Route 6 and continue backtracking to Cerulean City. There, heal up if needed and go east onto Route 9.

Route 9: Continue onto the Route and beat up the Jr. Trainer, then go down the two ledges to find TM30. TM30 teaches the move Teleport, the one Abra are infamous for - it allows instant escape from battles and caverns. Defeat the Hiker nearby, then go east and up the ledge.

Head to the southeastern portion of the Route and beat that Hiker. Head west and up two ledges to find a Trainer to beat. Defeat him and go north to find a Bug Catcher. Go west to find the grass on this Route. Go back east when done catching or grinding or whatever, then go down two more ledges.

Go east and up the ledge to find another Bug Catcher, then north and west is a Jr. Trainer. Go east and up the ledge near the Bug Catcher from before to battle a Hiker. Beat him and go east, then down the ledge to find the final Trainer for this route. After beating her, go east to Route 10.




Route 10



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Ekans Poison 35 60 44 40 55 Red
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 30 40 Blue/Green
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All
Voltorb Electric 40 30 50 55 100 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Pikachu Lv. 20, Clefairy Lv. 20

Voltorb is a new (wild) face. It is of the Electric type, one of the earliest
you can find. Assuming you didn't take the time to catch the rare Pikachu back
in Viridian Forest, try catching Voltorb now. Electric moves are
super-effective over Flying and Water, and are one of the few types that can do
just normal damage to Steel were you to bring it over to Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal. Plus, Electrode, its evolution, is among the
fastest Kanto Pokémon: indeed, it was the fastest Pokémon ever until the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire brought Ninjask and Deoxys-Speed into the picture. Even today (2014, Pokémon X/Y being the current newest games), Electrode is still the eighth fastest Pokémon!

The Route is fairly linear. Just head south to find some Cut trees, a Trainer, and a Pokémon Center. Enter the aforementioned Pokémon Center and heal your party. BRING ALONG YOUR FLASH USER and go into the Rock Tunnel nearby.




The Rock Tunnel



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Max Ether

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Geodude Rock/Ground 40 80 100 30 20 All
Machop Fighting 70 80 50 35 35 All
Onix Rock/Ground 35 45 160 30 70 All
Zubat Poison/Flying 40 45 35 40 55 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Cubone Lv. 23, Slowpoke Lv. 23
#2 Slowpoke Lv. 25
#3 Oddish Lv. 22, Bulbasaur Lv. 22
#4 Charmander Lv. 22, Cubone Lv. 22
#5 Geodude Lv. 25
#6 Machop Lv. 20, Onix Lv. 20
#7 Geodude Lv. 19, Geodude Lv. 19, Geodude Lv. 19, Machop Lv. 19
#8 Onix Lv. 20, Onix Lv. 20, Geodude Lv. 20
#9 Geodude Lv. 21, Graveler Lv. 21
#10 Jigglypuff Lv. 21, Meowth Lv. 21, Pidgey Lv. 21
#11 Geodude Lv. 21, Geodude Lv. 21, Graveler Lv. 21
#12 Slowpoke Lv. 20, Slowpoke Lv. 20, Slowpoke Lv. 20
#13 Bellsprout Lv. 22, Clefairy Lv. 22
#14 Bellsprout Lv. 19, Pidgey Lv. 19, Rattata Lv. 19, Rattata Lv. 19
#15 Meowth Lv. 20, Pidgey Lv. 20, Oddish Lv. 20
#16 Pidgey Lv. 21, Pidgeotto Lv. 21
#17 Geodude Lv. 21, Onix Lv. 21
#18 Onix Lv. 19, Graveler Lv. 19
#19 Cubone Lv. 20, Slowpoke Lv. 20

Rock Tunnel - 1F: When you enter, use Flash so you can actually see something. Then go southeast and
defeat the Pokémaniac, then northeast to find a ladder. Use it to go down a
floor.

Rock Tunnel - B1F: Go southwest and along the path to another Pokémaniac. Go west and along the path a north/west fork. Go north and you'll soon fight a Jr. Trainer. Go northeast for another Pokémaniac. Continue along the path until the fork. Go north to another battle, then around the rock to the south to find another battle. Use the ladder to the northwest to go down another floor.

Rock Tunnel - B2F: Get rid of the two Hikers here, then go east. You'll find another Hiker south of the ladder. Use the ladder nearby to go up a floor.

Rock Tunnel - B1F: Go west and beat up the Jr. Trainer, then further west for a fight against a Hiker. Go northwest from there for another fight, this one versus a Pokémaniac, then go north and take the ladder.

Rock Tunnel - 1F: Take out the nearby pair of Jr. Trainers, then go along the path to the west and defeat the final Trainer here. Go west a bit and then south to find the exit.

Rock Tunnel - South Exterior: Outside, defeat the Jr. Trainer nearby, then go east. Examine the odd bush to find a Max Ether, then go west from the exit to find a Hiker. Go down the ledge for another Hiker battle, then go east to find the final Pokémaniac of this area.

Then simply head into Lavender Town.




Lavender Town



LAVENDER POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon: has a catch rate of x1.5, 50% better than a Poké Ball.
Super Potion $700 Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO/Faint (FNT) with ~50% of their HP.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Escape Rope $500 Allows you to escape from certain dungeons, like caves.
Super Repel $500 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps: the most cost-effective Repel.

If this is the first time you've been shopping since getting the ThunderBadge,
you'll notice the Great Balls that are now available. They have 1.5x the catch
rate of the normal Poké Ball. The Revive is a status-healing item, used for the
faint/KO status (heals with 1/2 HP). Buy some of both.

The only thing of interest here at the moment, aside from the Pokémon Center and the PokéMart, would perhaps be the Name Rater's house, south-southwest of the large Pokémon Tower. The Name Rater will allow you to rename any Pokémon THAT YOU HAVE OWNED (ie. not from trades). The Pokémon Tower - the burial site for dead Pokémon - is the other main feature here, but we won't be able to do much in there, unless you're an advocate of glitchery.

Exit town, heading west.




Routes 7 & 8



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Ekans Poison 35 60 44 40 55 Red
Growlithe Fire 55 70 45 50 60 Red
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Meowth Normal 40 45 35 40 90 Blue/Green
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All
Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 30 40 Blue/Green
Vulpix Fire 38 41 40 65 65 Blue/Green

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Clefairy Lv. 22, Clefairy Lv. 22
#2 Growlithe Lv. 24, Vulpix Lv. 24
#3 Grimer Lv. 22, Grimer Lv. 22, Muk Lv. 22
#4 Clefairy Lv. 22, Jigglypuff Lv. 22
#5 Nidoran Lv. 23, Nidorina Lv. 23
#6 Koffing Lv. 26
#7 Meowth Lv. 24, Meowth Lv. 24, Meowth Lv. 24
#8 Pidgey Lv. 19, Pikachu Lv. 19, Rattata Lv. 19, Nidoran Lv. 19, Meowth Lv. 19
#9 Grimer Lv. 24, Grimer Lv. 22
#10 Koffing Lv. 22, Koffing Lv. 22, Grimer Lv. 23
#11 Poliwag Lv. 22, Poliwag Lv. 22, Poliwhirl Lv. 22
#12 Voltorb Lv. 20, Voltorb Lv. 20, Koffing Lv. 20, Magnemite Lv. 20

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Been a while since you've seen me mention "Pokémon Evaluations" in this significant a manner, eh? That's mostly because this is the first time in a while that there have been decent Pokémon. Of course, there's the Mankey, Pidgey, and Sandshrew you should already have. The other feature is the version-exclusive Fire Pokémon: both Vulpix and Growlithe (which evolve via Fire Stone to Ninetales and Arcanine, respectively) are very good Fire Pokémon for you to grab if you didn't get Charmander at the start of the game. It would be a good idea to get them now, in fact, since the next Gym is a Grass-type Gym.

Route 8: Go southwest and beat the Lass, then west for a Gambler. You can Cut down the tree to the west to reach the grass for this Route, also taking a shortcut. I still recommend first going northwest of the Gambler and beating a Super Nerd, then go west and beat up the four adjacent Trainers. Go south to find the western exit of the grass patch; enter if you want, though you will have to Cut down a tree. Go west from there to find a Gambler near the building, and a Super Nerd to the north of the Gambler. Go into the building now and go along the Underground Path to Route 7.

Route 7: Nothing much here; go north and west to Celadon City.




Celadon City


TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM13 (Ice Beam) [_] TM18 (Counter) [_] TM48 (Rock Slide) [_] TM49 (Tri Attack)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All [none] Eevee Normal
All [none - 120 Coins] Abra Psychic
All [none - 750 Coins] Clefairy Normal
Red [none - 1,200 Coins] Nidorina Poison
Blue/Green [none - 1,200 Coins] Nidorino Poison
Red [none - 2,500 Coins] Scyther Bug/Flying
Blue/Green [none - 2,500 Coins] Pinsir Bug
All [none - 4,600 Coins] Dratini Dragon
All [none - 6,500 Coins] Porygon Normal

CELADON DEPARTMENT STORE
Department Store: 2F Stocks (Left Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
TM32 (Double Team) $1,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM33 (Reflect) $1,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM02 (Razor Wind) $2,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM07 (Horn Drill) $2,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM37 (Egg Bomb) $2,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM01 (Mega Punch) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM05 (Mega Kick) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM09 (Take Down) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM17 (Submission) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
Department Store: 2F Stocks (Right Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon: has a catch rate of x1.5, 50% better than a Poké Ball.
Super Potion $700 Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO/Faint (FNT) with ~50% of their HP.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status ailment.
Super Repel $500 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps: the most cost-effective Repel.
Department Store: 4F Stocks
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Doll $1,000 Allows instant-escape from non-Trainer battles.
Fire Stone $2,100 Evolves Vulpix, Growlithe, and Eevee (into Ninetales, Arcanine, and Flareon)
ThunderStone $2,100 Evolves Pikachu and Eevee (into Raichu and Jolteon)
Water Stone $2,100 Evolves Poliwhirl, Shellder, Staryu, and Eevee (into Poliwrath, Cloyster, Starmie, and Vaporeon)
Leaf Stone $2,100 Evolves Gloom, Weepinbell, and Exeggcute (into Vileplume, Victreebel, and Exeggutor)
Department Store: 5F Stocks (Left Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
HP Up $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's HP Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Protein $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Attack Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Iron $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Defense Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Calcium $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Special Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Carbos $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Speed Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Department Store: 5F Stocks (Right Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
X Attack $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Attack stat in battle.
X Defend $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Defense stat in battle.
X Speed $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Speed stat in battle.
X Special $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Defense stat in battle.
X Accuracy $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's accuracy in battle so that their moves always hit.
Guard Spec. $700 Prevents the current Pokémon from getting stat changes.
Dire Hit $650 Boosts the current Pokémon's critical-hit rate in battle.
Department Store: 6F Stocks (Vending Machines)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Fresh Water $200 Heals 50 HP to a single Pokémon: noticeably cheaper than a Super Potion.
Soda Pop $300 Heals 60 HP to a single Pokémon.
Lemonade $350 Heals 80 HP to a single Pokémon.

ROCKET GAME CORNER PRIZE EXCHANGE
Left Vendor
Item/Pokémon Cost Version
Abra 120 Coins All
Clefairy 750 Coins All
Nidorina 1,200 Coins Red
Nidorino 1,200 Coins Blue/Green
Middle Vendor
Item/Pokémon Cost Version
Scyther 2,500 Coins Red
Pinsir 2,500 Coins Blue/Green
Dratini 4,600 Coins All
Porygon 6,500 Coins All
Right Vendor
Item/Pokémon Cost Version
TM23 (Dragon Rage) 3,300 Coins All
TM15 (Hyper Beam) 5,500 Coins All
TM50 (Substitute) 7,700 Coins All

Okay, we're finally in Celadon. Head over to the Pokémon Center and heal your
party. Then head over to the western side of the city and go into the Dept.
Store. Buy some stuff. There are also a few things of note: firstly, a guy on 
3F hands over TM18 (Counter); secondly, give the girl on the rooftop some of
the Vending Machine drinks to receive TMs - TM13 (Ice Beam) for Fresh Water,
TM48 (Rock Slide) for Soda Pop, and TM49 (Tri Attack) for Lemonade. Also be
sure to buy some Lemonades (overall better than Super Potions, both in effect and HP-per-dollar costs), and keep a
Fresh Water for future perusal in a story event.

Return to the Pokémon Center, go around back, follow the path, and go the mansion's back door. Go to the top floor and into another room to get a free Eevee at Lv. 25. With certain methods, it can evolve into one of a number of Pokémon: eight at the time of writing. However, in Pokémon Red, Blue, Green, and Yellow, it can only evolve into Flareon, Jolteon, and Vaporeon via the use of the Fire, Thunder-, and Water Stones, respectively. With certain mechanics in Pokémon Gold, Silver, Crystal, when traded, you may also get Umbreon or Espeon, but that's beyond the scope of this FAQ. I nonetheless would seriously suggest evolving it into a type complementing your starter. If you got Bulbasaur, use anyone; if you got Charmander, use Vaporeon; if you got Squirtle, use Flareon.

Now, head to the bar in the southeastern part of the city. A man within will hand over a free Coin Case for use at the trademark Rocket Game Corner. It's next to the Prize Exchange building nearby. There, you can buy cruelly-caught Pokémon for various prices. Dratini and Abra are mighty fine purchases, as is Porygon when it evolves into Porygon2 (although that's another Gold/Silver/Crystal thing). The TMs? Meh. You can actually buy Coins in the Rocket Game Corner itself, so you can always spend $92,000 on Dratini and live with it.

Next up, go to the Rocket Game Corner. It is southwest of the Pokémon Center.




Rocket Game Corner



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Escape Rope [_] HP Up [_] Hyper Potion [_] Lift Key [_] Moon Stone
[_] Nugget [_] Rare Candy [_] Silph Scope [_] Super Potion [_] TM02 (Razor Wind)
[_] TM07 (Horn Drill) [_] TM10 (Double Edge)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Raticate Lv. 20, Zubat Lv. 20
#2 Drowzee Lv. 21, Machop Lv. 21
#3 Raticate Lv. 21, Raticate Lv. 21
#4 Zubat Lv. 17, Zubat Lv. 17, Raticate Lv. 17, Koffing Lv. 17, Grimer Lv. 17
#5 Machop Lv. 21, Machop Lv. 21
#6 Rattata Lv. 20, Raticate Lv. 20, Drowzee Lv. 20
#7 Koffing Lv. 21, Zubat Lv. 21
#8 Rattata Lv. 19, Raticate Lv. 19, Rattata Lv. 19, Raticate Lv. 19
#9 Grimer Lv. 20, Koffing Lv. 20, Koffing Lv. 20
#10 Sandshrew Lv. 23, Sandslash Lv. 23, Ekans Lv. 23
#11 Ekans Lv. 23, Arbok Lv. 23, Sandshrew Lv. 23

When you enter, go to the Team Rocket grunt standing next to the counter,
standing near the poster as well, and speak with him. Defeat him in battle. He
will flee. Examine the poster he was near and you'll be allowed into the base.

Inside, go southeast to one grunt and beat him, then go west for another. Go south of the Rocket to find an Escape Rope. Return to the dual staircases and head down a floor.

Go south and west to battle another Rocket, then go further west to find a puzzle using arrow tiles. Use the bottom of the leftbound ones, then grab the item in the small alcove to the south to find a Moon Stone. Return to where you stopped and go along the top wall to the Nugget. Return to where you stopped once more, go south slightly, then go east on the arrow to find TM07 (Horn Drill).

Go east and south and on the westbound arrow. Take two paces east after you stop, and you'll ride for a bit. After stopping, take the westbound arrow. For another item, take the southern westbound arrow, then the eastmost northbound arrow to find a Super Potion.

Now return to where the two westbound arrows were and use the northern one. Take the eastbound arrow below it to leave the maze. Take the downbound staircase now.

Upon leaving the stairwell, go west and beat up the Rocket, as well as the one to his north. Go west of there to find a Hyper Potion, a spectacular item that heals 200 HP. Go downstairs and back to the maze area. West of the stairs, you can find a shortcut you can use with the northbound arrows to return to the beginning. Go down the unused stairs.

Go south and beat up the Rocket, then go along the path below the grunt to find TM10 (Double-Edge), which teaches a powerful Normal-type move that, however, will slightly damage the user. Go west of the staircase now to find another maze. A-maze-ing, no? *shot*

Anyways, go along the path to the south and use the southbound arrow to reach a Rare Candy. Then use the northbound arrow, then go north and around the west wall. At the west/east arrows, go on the western one and then south to where you'll find four eastbound arrows. Take the second one from the bottom to find a Rocket.

Kick the crap out of him, then go south and right around the wall. You'll find another staircase going down. Use it.

Go west to find an HP Up, then go north along the hall and into the room on the left to find another conveniently-weak Rocket. Speak with him after winning and you'll watch him drop the Lift Key. Awesome. Go to the other side of the table and grab the TM02 (Razor Wind). Return to the previously-unusable elevator to find that, lo and behold, the Rockets use working, authentic Lift Keys. =O

(If you forgot how to get there, go back up the stairs you recently used. Use the nortbound arrows you find to the west, then go upstairs again. Navigate this arrow-tile maze as before, then you'll be able to find the elevator.)

Opt to go to B4F. There, go north and beat up some more Rockets. The door will open and, very unsurprisingly, you'll come face-to-face with the supreme overlord of Team Rocket, Giovanni. He's not exactly happy to meet you, and that feeling is supposedly mutual.

Well, violence always solves everything in Pokémon; why not here?


BOSS: Giovanni

  • Rewards: $2,871

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Onix Rock/Ground Level 25 None
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground Level 24 None
Kangaskhan Normal Level 29 None

There's not a lot you shouldn't expect from this battle. Onix and Rhyhorn are very similar in the way Giovanni uses them; they're both weak to Water (4x), Grass (4x), Fighting, and Ice, with an immunity to Electric. Their moves put them advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ice, Flying, Electric, and Poison Pokémon for the most part.

Kangaskhan is less dynamic, mostly sticking with Normal moves. Fighting moves are her main weakness, and she's immune to Ghost.

In general, a good Grass or Water Pokémon (Vaporeon, for instance) will do well with Onix and Rhyhorn, and your starter will probably beat Kangaskhan out well.


After the battle, you'll be given the Silph Scope With that in hand, there's nothing else to do here, so leave.



Celadon City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] RainbowBadge [_] TM21 (Mega Drain)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Bellsprout Lv. 24, Bellsprout Lv. 24
#2 Bellsprout Lv. 23, Weepinbell Lv. 23
#3 Oddish Lv. 21, Bellsprout Lv. 21, Oddish Lv. 21, Bellsprout Lv. 21
#4 Bulbasaur Lv. 24, Ivysaur Lv. 24
#5 Weepinbell Lv. 22, Gloom Lv. 22, Ivysaur Lv. 22
#6 Exeggcute Lv. 24
#7 Oddish Lv. 23, Gloom Lv. 23

Celadon City: Next up is the Pokémon Gym. Head on over to the Pokémon Center, heal your
party, and bring along your Cut user. Head to the south-central part of the
city. Cut down the small tree nearby and go along the path to find the Celadon
City Gym.

Celadon Gym: The Celadon Gym is pretty simple. There are two Trainers near the front of the Gym, and one each at the west and east sides of the Gym. You'll need to use the eastern, western, or southern Cut trees around the central clearing to be able to get at the Gym Leader: there will be four people in that clearing. Three of them are more Gym Trainers, and the black-haired girl is Erika, the Gym Leader. I'd recommend popping off all of the Gym Trainers first and then healing at the Pokémon Center before fighting the leader, but it's your call.


BOSS: Gym Leader Erika

  • Rewards: $2,871; RainbowBadge; TM21 (Mega Drain)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Victreebel Grass/Poison Level 29 None
Tangela Grass Level 24 None
Vileplume Grass/Poison Level 29 None

There's a lot one would be able to expect from this battle: for the most part, you'll see STAB-boosted Grass-type moves and Poison- and Paralysis-inducing status ailments from these Pokémon. Tangela will be weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison, whereas the other two swap Bug and Poison for a Psychic weakness. They all have advantages over Water, Rock, and Ground as well, and you won't see a Poison-type offensive move here.

Overall, it's a simple fight, so long as you have any good Fire or Flying Pokémon: recommended Pokémon would include Charizard (most preferably), Fearow, Pidgeotto/Pidgeot, Arcanine, and Ninetales. Level 28~32 should be sufficient at this point.


After the battle, you will obtain your fourth Gym Badge, the RainbowBadge, which will allow you to use Strength outside of battle. (We'll get that HM soon enough.) You'll also obtain TM21, which teaches Mega Drain: it is a move that allows you to deal Grass damage to the target and then absorb half of the damage dealt as HP restoration.


SoulBadge



Sectional Flowchart



Note that, when you attempt to go to Fuschia City for the first time, there are two ways in which you can do this. There is one where you go via Cycling Road, which will require a Bicycle (though there's a simple glitch to bypass that need): it's the fastest, but not the best for EXP. and money. Silence Bridge is the exact opposite of that. Personally, it would be best to use both methods, Flying as needed to go back to where you start the other or something like that. It's ultimately up to you.




Obtaining the Fly HM



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] HM02 (Fly)

Celadon City: When you return from the Celadon City Gym, having obtained the RainbowBadge, our next primary goal would be the Pokémon Tower, since we also have the Silph Scope. However, it would be wise to go ahead and get the HM for Fly. Begin by going west from Celadon on Route 16.

Route 16: Here, go along the path briefly to a Cut tree, then Cut it down. Follow the path westward to the gatehouse to Cycling Road: you'll enter a hidden portion at the back of it. Go through there and into the house beyond to find a house in the clearing. Speak with the girl within to obtain HM02. HM02 teaches Fly: it is not only a decent two-turn Flying-type move, but it also allows you to Fly to previously-visited towns from the overworld.




Pokémon Tower



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Awakening [_] Elixer [_] Escape Rope [_] HP Up [_] Nugget [_] Poké Flute
[_] Rare Candy [_] X Accuracy

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (POKÉMON TOWER)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Cubone Ground 50 50 95 40 35 All
Gastly Ghost/Poison 30 35 30 100 80 All
Haunter Ghost/Poison 45 50 45 115 95 All
Marowak (one-time) Ground 60 80 110 50 45 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON (POKÉMON TOWER)
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Gastly Lv. 23
#2 Gastly Lv. 22
#3 Gastly Lv. 24
#4 Gastly Lv. 23, Gastly Lv. 23
#5 Gastly Lv. 22
#6 Gastly Lv. 24
#7 Gastly Lv. 22
#8 Haunter Lv. 23
#9 Gastly Lv. 24
#10 Gastly Lv. 22
#11 Gastly Lv. 22, Gastly Lv. 22, Gastly Lv. 22
#12 Gastly Lv. 24
#13 Gastly Lv. 24
#14 Zubat Lv. 25, Zubat Lv. 25, Golbat Lv. 25
#15 Koffing Lv. 26, Drowzee Lv. 26
#16 Zubat Lv. 23, Zubat Lv. 23, Rattata Lv. 23, Raticate Lv. 23

Celadon City: With the Fly HM in hand, it will now be a good idea to get back onto the main quest. Fly to Lavender Town.

Lavender Town: Buy some Pokéballs if you want some new Pokémon, heal up if needed, then head into the Pokémon Tower in the northeast corner of town.

Pokémon Tower - 1F: Pokémon Tower, knowing the canon behind it (the burial place of dead Pokémon), is obviously going to be filled with many Ghost Pokémon. Without the aid of the Silph Scope, you would not be able to even attack or capture opponent Pokémon. The Pokémon here mostly consist of Gastly and Cubone, with Haunter occasionally appearing. Gastly and Haunter are great to capture if you have the ability to trade as Gengar is both fast and strong. Cubone is not as good here as he is in Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal, where the Thick Club can double his Attack so high that it causes an overflowing glitch, but Marowak can be a decent Ground Pokémon even without that kind of a boost.

Pokémon Tower - 2F: Go upstairs to 2F and you'll find your rival. Time for a battle!


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $1,625

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charmeleon Fire Level 25 Bulbasaur was your starter
Wartortle Water Level 25 Charmander was your starter
Ivysaur Grass/Poison Level 25 Squirtle was your starter
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 22-23 Bulbasaur or Squirtle was your starter
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic Level 22-23 Bulbasaur or Charmander was your starter
Growlithe Fire Level 22-23 Charmander or Squirtle was your starter
Pidgeotto Normal/Flying Level 25 None
Kadabra Psychic Level 20 None

  • Charmeleon and Growlithe are weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. They are advantageous over Ice, Grass, and Bug.

  • Wartortle is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water moves, and thus is going to hurt Fire, Rock, and Ground moves.

  • Ivysaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It'll know Grass moves by now, so avoid using Ground, Water, and Rock Pokémon.

  • Pidgeotto is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground. Avoid using Fighting, Bug, and Grass Pokémon here.

  • Kadabra is weak to Bug and Ghost. It'll have advantages over Poison and Fighting Pokémon.

  • Gyarados is doubly-weak to Electric and also weak to Rock. It is immune to Ground, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Exeggcute is doubly-weak to Bug, and also weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Ghost. It has advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, Fighting, and Poison.

You know, Pokémon games' rivalries are not usually as complex as they begin to get here in Red/Blue/Green: your rival will have two biconditional Pokémon that will depend on you having one of two starters, interestingly enough. Those using Ivysaur/Venusaur will likely want to have a good Rock Pokémon, Arcanine/Ninetales, and perhaps Haunter/Gengar. Those with Charmeleon/Charizard will need a variety of Pokémon: Electrode/Raichu, Victreebel, and Vaporeon should take most of them. Those with Wartortle/Blastoise simply need their starter, Arcanine/Ninetales, and a good Rock Pokémon.

Overall, it's mostly about pinpointing the opponent's weaknesses in this battle, and most of the appropriate Pokémon are ones you should have picked up long ago. You actually could've done this before the Celadon Gym, too, so if you were able to beat that, you shouldn't have (a ton) trouble here.


After defeating your rival, he'll speak of how he found a Cubone in Pokémon
Tower, yet he cannot find a Marowak here, the evolved form of Cubone. This is because the lone Marowak here is simply a ghost now, killed by Team Rocket... T_T

Pokémon Tower - 3F: Head on up to the third, foggy floor. Go to the northern part of the room, battle the Channeler, then grab the Escape Rope. Go south and defeat another Channeler, with another to her north. Go upstairs.

Pokémon Tower - 4F: Go west, battle a Channeler, then grab the Elixer and the Awakening. Go south of the previous Channeler and battle another one, then go further south and grab the HP Up. Go northwest and defeat one more Channeler, then go west and upstairs.

Pokémon Tower - 5F: On this floor, go east and north and defeat the Channeler, then go southeast for another. Go west and speak with that Channeler. While not possessed like the others, she'll show you the pseudo-Pokémon Center: the white squares. It will fully heal your Pokémon's HP, PP, and status.

Then go west and de-possess that Channeler. Head south afterwards and grab that golden Nugget. Further south is one more Channeler. Get rid of the crazy spirits that are possessing her. Then go east and north to the stairs and head on up.

Pokémon Tower - 6F: Go west and defeat the Channeler there, then go west south to find an X Accuracy. Go north to find another Channeler. Go around to the west and de-possess that last Channeler.

Go southwest and grab up that Rare Candy, then go southeast to find some stairs. Go along to find the ghosty version of the Marowak Team Rocket so cruelly murdered. You'll battle it. Because it is a ghost, you cannot catch it. However, it still remains of the Ground type, and is therefore weak to Ice, Grass, and Water; advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Electric; and immune to Electric. You can also simply run from the battle if you prefer.

Pokémon Tower - 7F: Continue up to the next floor. There, beat up three of the Team Rocket Grunts. Afterwards, speak with Mr. Fuji. He will take you out of the Pokémon Tower.

Lavender Town: Once you've left the Tower, speaking with Mr. Fuji will net you the Poké Flute. This magnificent item acts much like a never-ending Awakening; use it to wake up Sleeping Pokémon in battle and you'll never lose the Flute. Also, you'll be able to go to wake up the sleeping Snorlaxes on a few Routes.

Now, our next goal is Fuschia City, where the next Pokémon Gym - as well as the Safari Zone and two more HMs - lies. There are two methods to get there: you can go via [[ Going to Fuschia: Cycling Road (Routes 16-18)|Cycling Road]] to the west of Celadon City, which is arguably the faster of the two methods but not suited to those needing/wanting EXP. and money. There's also [[Going to Fuschia: Silence Bridge (Routes 12-15)|Silence Bridge]], which begins to the south of Lavender Town; it is the longer of the two, and the most profitable. Personally, I would prefer you use both methods before doing all of the stuff in Fuschia City proper, but to each their own.




Going to Fuschia: Cycling Road (Routes 16-18)



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Duduo Normal/Flying 35 85 45 35 75 All
Fearow Normal/Flying 65 90 65 61 100 All
Raticate Normal 55 81 60 50 97 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Snorlax (one-time) Normal 160 110 65 65 30 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Slowbro Lickitung Normal

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Grimer Lv. 29, Koffing Lv. 29
#2 Machop Lv. 28, Machop Lv. 28, Mankey Lv. 28
#3 Mankey Lv. 29, Machop Lv. 29
#4 Weezing Lv. 33
#5 Weezing Lv. 28, Weezing Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28
#6 Mankey Lv. 29, Machop Lv. 29
#7 Weezing Lv. 28, Weezing Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28
#8 Machop Lv. 29, Machamp Lv. 29
#9 Mankey Lv. 29, Primeape Lv. 29
#10 Voltorb Lv. 29, Voltorb Lv. 29
#11 Machoke Lv. 33
#12 Primeape Lv. 29, Machoke Lv. 29
#13 Koffing Lv. 25, Koffing Lv. 25, Koffing Lv. 25, Weezing Lv. 25, Weezing Lv. 25
#14 Muk Lv. 33
#15 Mankey Lv. 26, Mankey Lv. 26, Machop Lv. 26, Machamp Lv. 26
#16 Weezing Lv. 29, Muk Lv. 29
#17 Spearow Lv. 26, Spearow Lv. 26, Spearow Lv. 26, Fearow Lv. 26
#18 Spearow Lv. 29, Fearow Lv. 29
#19 Dodrio Lv. 34

Celadon City: Try to exit Celadon heading west. You'll find Snorlax there blocking the way to the southern half of the Cycling Road gatehouse; face it and use the Poké Flute to battle the Snorlax. Snorlax is a Lv. 30 Normal-type Pokémon. It can use Rest (self-heal + Sleep),
Snore (attack while sleeping), and some other moves. It has high Special, too, which makes it hard to hit it with non-physical moves

After the battle, go west of Snorlax's old location and go inside of the nearby building. Be sure you get your Bicycle and go into the gate. (You can also just hold Left on the D-Pad if you lack your Bicycle; you'll eventually bypass the guard during his speech due to a glitch, only present in this exact situation for some reason.) Leave the gatehouse and you should be on Cycling Road.

Cycling Road - Routes 16~18: Beat up the Trainers at the top of the Cycling Road, then start heading down the slope. On the right, you'll find some grass and some more Trainers further down, with another to their west. Further down is a fork. Go along to the left for three Trainers, then come back up and go down the right parh for some more. Once they converge, defeat another Trainer. Continue down and get off the slope.

Go east into the building and you'll be able to get off your bike. Go up the stairs and you can have a trade: if you hand over Slowbro, you'll receive a Lickitung, and this is the only way to get one.

Once outside the building, go southeast to find a bit of grass with some more Trainers. Defeat the Bird Keeper trio and head east to find Fuschia City, or Fly to Lavender to go along the [[Going to Fuschia: Silence Bridge (Routes 12-15)|Silence Bridge]].




Going to Fuschia: Silence Bridge (Routes 12-15)



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Calcium [_] Iron [_] PP Up [_] Super Rod [_] TM20 (Rage)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 70 40 Blue/Green
Ditto Normal 48 48 48 48 48 All
Gloom Grass/Poison 60 65 70 85 40 Red
Oddish Grass/Poison 45 50 55 75 30 Red
Pidgeotto Normal/Flying 63 60 55 50 71 All
Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 35 56 All
Snorlax (one-time) Normal 160 110 65 65 30 All
Venonat Bug/Poison 60 55 50 40 45 All
Weepinbell Grass/Poison 65 90 120 85 60 Blue/Green

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Goldeen Lv. 22, Goldeen Lv. 22, Poliwag Lv. 22
#2 Tentacool Lv. 24, Goldeen Lv. 24
#3 Goldeen Lv. 27
#4 Poliwag Lv. 21, Shellder Lv. 21, Goldeen Lv. 21, Horsea Lv. 21
#5 Nidoran Lv. 24, Nidoran Lv. 24
#6 Voltorb Lv. 29, Electrode Lv. 29
#7 Nidoran Lv. 29, Nidorino Lv. 29
#8 Magikarp Lv. 24, Magikarp Lv. 24
#9 Goldeen Lv. 28, Horsea Lv. 28, Poliwag Lv. 28
#10 Pidgey Lv. 29, Pidgeooto Lv. 29
#11 Pidgey Lv. 24, Meowth Lv. 24, Meowth Lv. 24, Pikachu Lv. 24, Rattata Lv. 24
#12 Rattata Lv. 27, Rattata Lv. 27, Pikachu Lv. 27
#13 Clefairy Lv. 29, Meowth Lv. 29
#14 Poliwag Lv. 30, Poliwag Lv. 30
#15 Pidgey Lv. 27, Pidgeotto Lv. 27, Meowth Lv. 27
#16 Pidgey Lv. 26, Pidgeotto Lv. 26, Spearow Lv. 26, Fearow Lv. 26
#17 Spearow Lv. 25, Spearow Lv. 25, Spearow Lv. 25, Pidgey Lv. 25, Pidgey Lv. 25
#18 Koffing Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28
#19 Pidgey Lv. 28, Pidgeotto Lv. 28, Doduo Lv. 28
#20 Pidgey Lv. 26, Pidgey Lv. 26, Spearow Lv. 26, Fearow Lv. 26
#21 Pidgeotto Lv. 29, Fearow Lv. 29
#22 Spearow Lv. 28, Fearow Lv. 28, Doduo Lv. 28
#23 Farfetch'd Lv. 33
#24 Spearow Lv. 29, Fearow Lv. 29
#25 Koffing Lv. 29, Muk Lv. 29
#26 Koffing Lv. 29, Grimer Lv. 29
#27 Grimer Lv. 28, Grimer Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28
#28 Koffing Lv. 26, Koffing Lv. 26, Koffing Lv. 26, Grimer Lv. 26
#29 Charmander Lv. 29, Squirtle Lv. 29
#30 Pikachu Lv. 29, Raichu Lv. 29
#31 Hitmonchan Lv. 29, Hitmonlee Lv. 29
#32 Clefairy Lv. 33
#33 Koffing Lv. 25, Koffing Lv. 25, Koffing Lv. 25, Weezing Lv. 25, Grimer Lv. 25
#34 Koffing Lv. 28, Weezing Lv. 28, Grimer Lv. 28
#35 Pidgeotto Lv. 29, Wigglytuff Lv. 29
#36 Bulbasaur Lv. 29, Ivysaur Lv. 29
#37 Gloom Lv. 28, Oddish Lv. 28, Oddish Lv. 28
#38 Dodrio Lv. 28, Doduo Lv. 28, Doduo Lv. 28
#39 Pidgeotto Lv. 26, Pidgey Lv. 26, Doduo Lv. 26, Farfetch'd Lv. 26
#40 Bellsprout Lv. 29, Oddish Lv. 29, Tangela Lv. 29

Lavender Town: Exit to the south onto Route 12.

Silence Bridge (Routes 12-15): Continue southward along the Route for a while. You'll fight four Trainers as you continue southward to the Snorlax. Face it and use the Poké Flute to awaken it: this enrages it (kinda reminds me of the Johto championships from the anime) and causes a battle. Snorlax is a Lv. 30 Normal-type Pokémon. It can use Rest (self-heal + Sleep), Snore (attack while sleeping), and some other moves. It has a high Special stat as well.

Continue along the Route to find a house. Go inside and speak with the man inside to receive the Super Rod. It's quite useful for fishing (unlike the Old Rod). Leave the house and go south and you'll notice some woody area to the west. Use Cut to get in there; defeat the Fisherman and grab the Iron.

Go southeast of the bushes to find a Jr. Trainer. Then go south and Cut into the patch of grass nearby, if you want. Keep going south and you'll soon meet a female Jr. Trainer, then continue south for a Bird Keeper and another Jr. Trainer.

Go west from the sign mentioning Silence Bridge and examine the space right of the sign behind the barrier to find a Calcium. Continue along the linear path for a bit. Your fifth battle should be versus a Bird Keeper with four Lv. 26 birds. Go west and you'll find a PP Up in the space between the barriers.

After another five battles, the last three of which are Bird Keepers, you should be technically at the end of Silence Bridge. Go south for another Bird Keeper. Go south for two more battles, then go west and Cut down the tree to find some Bikers.

If you Cut down the tree below the northern grass, you'll be able to skip a few Trainers, except one Jr. Trainer with a Lv. 33 Clefairy. You'll also be getting TM20 (Rage) this way. Of course, defeat the remaining eleven Trainers, too, for extra EXP.

Once you're done, go west into Fuchsia City.




Fuschia City



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Good Rod

FUSCHIA CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Ultra Ball $1,200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x2.0, double a normal Poké Ball's.
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Super Potion $700 Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Super Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps. The most cost-effective Repel.

Upon arriving, head on over to the Pokémon Center. It is on the western side of
town, kind of off of the path to the south. Heal up there.

Next, go around the Pokémon Center to find a Move Deleter. This person will (for free) delete any move (be it level-learned, TM, or HM) from the Pokémon's current moveset. This can useful when you find better HM-slaving Pokémon so you don't have to put weak HMs like Cut and Flash on your main party.

Go east to find another few houses. One is the residence of the Safari Warden, who seems to have lost his (golden!?) false teeth. We'll later find these teeth within the Safari Zone. The other house is one in which you get the Good Rod by speaking with the man inside.

Okay, now find the sign for Fuchsia City. See the light grass path? Go along it and you soon will find the PokéMart. Visit there if you wish. Continue along the path and you will soon come by the Safari Zone. Come with $500 - you are required to go here.




The Safari Zone



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Carbos [_] Full Restore [_] Gold Teeth [_] HM03 (Surf) [_] Max Potion
[_] Protein [_] TM32 (Double Team) [_] TM37 (Egg Bomb) [_] TM40 (Skull Bash)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Center Safari Zone Area
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Chansey Normal 250 5 5 105 50 All
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic 60 40 80 60 40 All
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 Red
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 Blue/Green
Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 55 55 Red
Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 55 65 Blue/Green
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground 80 85 95 30 25 All
Venonat Bug/Poison 60 55 40 40 45 All
Safari Zone: Area 1
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Doduo Normal/Flying 35 85 45 35 75 All
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic 60 40 80 60 40 All
Kangaskhan Normal 105 95 80 40 90 All
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 Red
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 Blue/Green
Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 55 55 Red
Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 55 65 Blue/Green
Paras Bug/Grass 35 70 55 55 25 All
Parasect Bug/Grass 60 95 80 80 30 All
Pinsir Bug 65 125 100 55 85 Red
Scyther Bug/Flying 70 110 80 55 105 Blue/Green
Safari Zone: Area 2
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed All
Chansey Normal 250 5 5 105 50 All
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic 60 40 80 60 40 All
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 Red
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 Blue/Green
Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 55 55 Red
Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 55 65 Blue/Green
Paras Bug/Grass 35 70 55 55 25 All
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground 80 85 95 30 25 All
Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 All
Safari Zone: Area 3
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Doduo Normal/Flying 35 85 45 35 75 All
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic 60 40 80 60 40 All
Kangaskhan Normal 105 95 80 40 90 All
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 Red
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 Blue/Green
Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 55 55 Red
Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 55 65 Blue/Green
Tauros Normal 75 100 95 70 110 All
Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 All
Venonat Bug/Poison 60 55 40 40 45 All

A bit on the Safari Zone, first. The Safari Zone, much like similar locations
in most of the other games, allows you to catch certain Pokémon that sometimes
cannot be found elsewhere (without trading). The system is like this: when you
get into a battle, you can either try to catch, throw a rock, or throw some
bait. The first allows you to try to catch the opponent using a Safari Ball,
which you obtain 30 of per trip. Safari Balls are exactly as effective as a Great Ball with a x1.5 catch rate, 50% better than a Poké Ball. The second increases the catch rate and also
makes it likely for the opponent to leave. The third decreases the catch and
run-away rates. You do not use your own Pokémon. You can save in here, unlike
with FireRed/LeafGreen, which is vulnerable to one of the many glitches in first-generation Pokémon games. You will leave when you take 500 steps or run out of Safari Balls.

Okay, let's pay our $500 and enter. Go out to the north.

In the Safari Zone, go northeast to the Center Area.

There, go upstairs to the east and grab the Carbos found to the north. Go to the main square area to find TM37 (Egg Bomb) on a bridge in the water, then go the northwestern corner of the main square to find a Max Potion. Go northeast to the Rest House and grab the nearby Full Restore. Go northwest from there and then west to Area 2.

Here, go west and along the winding route to find a few water pools. Go around and up the northern trees; you'll get a Protein and TM40 (Skull Bash) as you do. Continue to the northwest corner of the Area, then go south on the west side of the pools.

Boom! Area 3. Nearby are the Warden's Gold Teeth. Go west to find TM32 (Double Team), and go into the "secret" house. Within, you'll be given HM03. HM03 will teach the VERY necessary move known as Surf, which allows you to tread water out of battle. In battle, it is a powerful Water-type move. You can't tread water, though, until you beat the next Gym.

Do want you want for now. Return to Fuchsia when you're ready.




Fuschia City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] HM04 (Strength) [_] Rare Candy [_] SoulBadge [_] TM06 (Toxic)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Drowzee Lv. 34, Kadabra Lv. 34
#2 Hypno Lv. 38
#3 Drowzee Lv. 31, Drowzee Lv. 31, Drowzee Lv. 31, Kadabra Lv. 31
#4 Arbok Lv. 33, Arbok Lv. 33, Sandslash Lv. 33
#5 Sandslash Lv. 34, Arbok Lv. 34
#6 Drowzee Lv. 34, Hypno Lv. 34

Fuschia City: Remember where the Warden's house was? Go there and hand him his Gold Teeth
to obtain HM04, Strength. Strength is an 80-Power Normal-type move. Not
exactly the best move, but still good. (Better than Flash!) Teach it to someone
and move the rock nearby using it to obtain a Rare Candy.

Heal up your team and head to the Pokémon Gym. It's near the Pokémon Center and marked with the obvious "GYM" on the front.

Fuschia Gym: This particular Gym seems to be extremely linear... *bump* Or is it? There are invisible walls in this Gym. You'll notice them by looking at the floor and seeing the lightly-colored dots in the tile's four corners. Start from the left and work around in a spiral.

Before you work on Trainer number seven (the Leader), you will definitely want to go and grab some Antidotes (or Full Heals) and a Psychic or Ground Pokémon. Speak to the last Trainer when ready.


BOSS: Gym Leader Koga

  • Rewards: $4,257; SoulBadge; TM06 (Toxic)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Koffing Poison Level 37 None
Koffing Poison Level 37 None
Muk Poison Level 39 None
Weezing Poison Level 43 None

Y'know, this battle would be moderately more difficult in later years when Pokémon got their abilities: three of the four Pokémon here would be immune to Ground! Anyhow, these Pokémon are all pretty similar strategically: they're weak to Ground and Poison, and have advantages only over Grass with their Poison moves. Most of their attacks are either Normal- or Poison-typed, too, though you can also expect to see Toxic - which causes Bad Poisoning that will increment from 1/16 to 2/16 to 3/16 of 4/16 of the max HP removed per turn (death in five assuredly).

Still, you won't have to worry too much if you have a decent weakness-piercing Pokémon on hand. Recommended Pokémon would include Kadabra, Alakazam, Graveler, Golem, Dugtrio, Sandslash, and Marowak: none of these Pokémon should have any significant difficulty at Level 43~46. Even if you lack those, you can just toss in your starter (remember, Venusaur is half-Poison, so he doesn't take super-effective damage from Poison): pretty much anything non-Grass is good.


For winning, you'll be given your fifth badge, the SoulBadge, which allows you to Surf out of battles. You also get TM06, which teaches Toxic, a move whose uses were demonstrated in this battle already.


MarshBadge



Sectional Flowchart



As with our earlier gaining of the ability to use Cut, there is a bit of cleanup for items we can do involving the Surf HM and our ability to now use it outside of battle. Like with the Cut stuff, it's optional, but very valuable, especially in the latter quest for Zapdos.




Surf Item Cleanup - Silence Bridge



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM16 (Pay Day)

Fuschia City: When you've gotten the SoulBadge, heal up in the Pokémon Center, then Fly to Lavender Town.

Lavender Town: Leave south onto Route 12.

Silence Bridge - Route 12: Go south until you find an item ball previously unreachable. Well, teach Surf to a Pokémon (if you haven't done so already) and Surf across the water to grab the item, TM16, which teaches Pay Day.




Surf Item Cleanup - The Power Plant & Zapdos



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Carbos [_] Max Elixer [_] HP Up [_] PP Up [_] Rare Candy [_] TM25 (Thunder)
[_] TM33 (Reflect)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA (POWER PLANT)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Electabuzz Electric 65 83 57 85 105 Red
Electrode Electric 60 50 70 80 140 All
Magnemite Electric 25 35 70 95 45 All
Magneton Electric 50 60 95 120 70 All
Pikachu Electric 35 55 30 50 90 All
Raichu Electric 60 90 55 90 100 All
Voltorb Electric 40 30 50 55 100 All
Zapdos (one-time) Electric/Flying 90 90 85 125 100 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Rhyhorn Lv. 30, Lickitung Lv. 30

Silence Bridge - Route 12: When you've gotten TM16, Fly next to Cerulean City.

Cerulean City: Leave east onto Route 9.

Route 9: Go along the Route to the patch of grass north of the Pokémon Center and go into the grass. North of there should be a river. Get on it while Surfing, then go along for a while to eventually reach land. Go west and beat up the Pokémaniac, then continue into the Power Plant.

Power Plant: Go north from the entrance and then east to snatch a Carbos. Go along the curve southward and, to the right, you'll notice an item ball. This is actually a Voltorb, so fight! Go east to find a dead end with a Voltorb and Electrode; examine the wall next to the Electrode's (old) location to find a Max Elixer.

Go back to the middle southbound path and ride it to the far south. To the west, you'll find TM33 (Reflect); east, you'll find a Voltorb. Go east along the unused path and you'll find two more Voltorb. Once you see the north-south crack in the wall, go west and grab TM25 (Thunder) and east to find a Voltorb. Continue east to the wall, then go north along it; you'll find a PP Up and a Rare Candy in a room eventually.

Return to the main hall and go up and down the wall. The item ball you'll soon reach is another Electrode. Go up the path and examine the eastern wall crack to find a useful PP Up. Go west and south to find Zapdos. Save and engage it in battle!

Zapdos is not a Pokémon you'll want to beat, though. Do note that, as an Electric/Flying Pokémon, it is weak to Ice and Rock, and immune to Ground. It will mostly stick to Drill Peck for nasty Flying damage, even nastier on Grass, Fighting, and Bug Pokémon. For the most part, you'll simply want to carefully lower Zapdos's HP, then apply a non-damaging ailment to it like Paralysis or Sleep, then attempt to use an Ultra Ball. Just keep trying and, if you fail, you can always save and reload.

We're done, though, after that.




Saffron City



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM29 (Psychic)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Notes
All [none] Hitmonchan Fighting You only get one!!
All [none] Hitmonlee Fighting

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON (DOJO)
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Machop Lv. 31, Mankey Lv. 31, Primeape Lv. 31
#2 Machop Lv. 32, Machoke Lv. 32
#3 Mankey Lv. 31, Mankey Lv. 31, Primeape Lv. 31
#4 Primeape Lv. 36
#5 Hitmonlee Lv. 37, Hitmonchan Lv. 37

SAFFRON CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals 200 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Escape Rope $500 Allows you to escape from certain natural dungeons, like caves.
Super Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps. The most cost-effective Repel.

Celadon City: After whatever you're done with in regards to Surf-based item gathering, head to Celadon City. If you do not have a Fresh Water, go to the top of the Department Store and get one for $200 from one of the vending machines there. Then go east from Celadon City onto Route 7.

Route 7: Go east and into the Saffron City gatehouse. As you attempt to go through, the guard will stop you, being a jerk because he's thirsty, as always. However, having the Fresh Water will allow you through not only this gatehouse, but the other three to the north, east, and south of Saffron. Nice.

Saffron City: Okay, head to the southwestern corner of the city (west of you, if you came from Vermilion) to find the Pokémon Center. Use it. Go east of there to Mr. Psychic's house. Speak with the man inside to get TM29, which teaches Psychic. It's a ... well, it's a decent Psychic-type move! =P

Continue east and circle around to find Silph Co.: the biggest building in the city. There will be a Rocket grunt sleeping on the job once you beat Koga. (Yeah, if you couldn't figure it out yet, you could have come here BEFORE going to Fuchsia. That'd be too much Flying around, though, and Koga is supposed to be fifth.) Ignore it for now.

The Fighting Dojo and the Saffron City Gym are in the northeast corner of the city. Go on in into the Dojo, the only available one at the moment.

Fighting Dojo: For the record, all of the Pokémon in this Gym are of the Fighting type. These Pokémon therefore are weak to Flying and Psychic - ironically in a city with a Psychic Gym - and are advantageous over Normal, Ice, and Rock. It will be a simple matter to beat them all, even if you lack a Flying or Psychic Pokémon, since your starter should very well suffice.

After defeating the fifth and final Trainer, you'll be allowed to get either a Hitmonlee or Hitmonchan, both Fighting Pokémon. The former has higher Attack, but lacks real move-type variety. The latter has a diverse move-type learnset, but lacks the Special stat to support it. Your choice.

Saffron City: Go south and west some to find the PokéMart. Use it, then heal back up in the Pokémon Center if you need to. Then go to Silph Co.




Liberating Silph Co.



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Calcium [_] Carbos [_] Card Key [_] Escape Rope [_] Full Heal
[_] HP Up [_] Hyper Potion [_] Master Ball [_] Max Potion [_] Protein
[_] Rare Candy [_] TM03 (Swords Dance) [_] TM26 (Earthquake) [_] TM36 (Self-Destruct) [_] X Accuracy

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All [none] Lapras Water/Ice

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Rattata Lv. 25, Rattata Lv. 25, Rattata Lv. 25, Zubat Lv. 25, Ekans Lv. 25
#2 Hypno Lv. 33
#3 Kadabra Lv. 29, Mr. Mime Lv. 29
#4 Magneton Lv. 26, Magnemite Lv. 26, Koffing Lv. 26, Weezing Lv. 26
#5 Arbok Lv. 33
#6 Golbat Lv. 25, Zubat Lv. 25, Zubat Lv. 25, Zubat Lv. 25, Raticate Lv. 25
#7 Cubone Lv. 29, Zubat Lv. 29
#8 Grimer Lv. 26, Koffing Lv. 26, Weezing Lv. 26, Weezing Lv. 26
#9 Magnemite Lv. 28, Magneton Lv. 28, Voltorb Lv. 28
#10 Ekans Lv. 28, Cubone Lv. 28, Zubat Lv. 28
#11 Machop Lv. 29, Drowzee Lv. 29
#12 Electrode Lv. 33
#13 Machop Lv. 29, Machoke Lv. 29
#14 Voltorb Lv. 25, Magnemite Lv. 25, Magneton Lv. 25, Koffing Lv. 25, Koffing Lv. 25
#15 Zubat Lv. 28, Zubat Lv. 28, Golbat Lv. 28
#16 Cubone Lv. 29, Cubone Lv. 29
#17 Raticate Lv. 26, Rattata Lv. 26, Zubat Lv. 26, Golbat Lv. 26
#18 Electrode Lv. 29, Muk Lv. 29
#19 Sandshrew Lv. 29, Sandslash Lv. 29
#20 Raticate Lv. 26, Golbat Lv. 26, Koffing Lv. 26, Arbok Lv. 26
#21 Weezing Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28, Golbat Lv. 28
#22 Grimer Lv. 29, Electrode Lv. 29
#23 Voltorb Lv. 28, Koffing Lv. 28, Magneton Lv. 28
#24 Golbat Lv. 28, Hypno Lv. 28, Drowzee Lv. 28
#25 Drowzee Lv. 28, Machop Lv. 28, Grimer Lv. 28
#26 Magnemite Lv. 29, Koffing Lv. 29
#27 Machoke Lv. 33
#28 Raticate Lv. 28, Raticate Lv. 28, Hypno Lv. 28
#29 Electrode Lv. 29, Weezing Lv. 29
#30 Cubone Lv. 32, Drowzee Lv. 32, Marowak Lv. 32

Silph Co. - 5F: Use the elevator to reach 5F. Go southwest and along the narrow hall to find a
Rocket grunt near a square thingy. That thingy will make you real lost real
fast. FOLLOW THIS FAQ; LEAVE THOSE "THINGIES" ALONE. Beat up this Rocket and
use the teleporter, then reuse. Go along the eastbound corridor to find the
Card Key. That will let you in all of the locked rooms of the building.

By technicality, you could go to 3F and beat up Giovanni again. But I'm gonna make you work for that info... Ah, crap. Well, do this stuff anyways. It's good EXP. and items and money. We'll work our way up from 2F.

Silph Co. - 2F: Go below the stairs to find a Rocket, then go southwest to find another one between two tables. Go into the room east of here and beat up the Scientist. There are two rooms to the west. Use the northern one to find a girl who will hand over TM36 (Self-Destruct); the southern one yields a Scientist battle.

Use the stairs to reach 3F.

Silph Co. - 3F: Go along the middle corridor and beat up the Rocket, then unlock the two doors to the west. Defeat the Rocket Scientist (see what I did there?) and go northeast to find a Hyper Potion. Go on up to 4F.

Silph Co. - 4F: Go south and slay the Rocket in battle, then use the tiny hall in the middle of the room. Go west to another Rocket grunt, then go through the northern door to find another Scientist. Battle him. Then open the final door in this floor to find a minor wealth of minor items: Full Heal, Escape Rope, and a Max Revive. Okay, that last one isn't very minor! Go upstairs to 5F again.

Silph Co. - 5F: Beat the Rocket to the east, then beat up the Juggler in the big room nearby. Examine the Pokémon Reports, for it might intrigue you, then go through the door to the west to free someone. Go to the western bit of the area and defeat another Rocket Scientist.

Unlock the door to the west to find some Protein, then go up to 6F.

Silph Co. - 6F: Defeat the Rocket to the south, then go west of there and unlock the door to find another couple of items: X Accuracy and HP Up. Then beat up the Scientist to the north. Then go up to 7F.

Silph Co. - 7F: Beat up the nearby Rocket, then open the southeastern room to find TM03 (Swords Dance). The next door allows another fight. After that one, go along the small hallway in the middle of the room and you'll eventually find some Calcium and some guy you don't know but obviously want to kick the crap out of and I can't think of a reason why not to so do it. *whew!*

After beating that Scientist, go back around to the elevator and beat the Rocket west of there, then use the door to the south to free up some Silph employees. (Or not. No one cares.) Head up to 8F when you're done.

Silph Co. - 8F: Go east and beat the Rocket until he blasts off, then go down the middle corridor and get rid of this Rocket. Go up the room to the left to find another Scientist. Unlock the door to the left to find another Silph employee -- or, again, don't do it because it creates minor humor. Go up to 9F.

Silph Co. - 9F: Go through the two southern doors to find a Scientist. Baffle his mind, like usual, then go to the other side of the room and rocket defeat down the Team Rocket grunt's throat. Go into the room to the west to find a nurse who will freely heal your party. Which you REALLY needed by now. After all, I'm so very sure a Lv. 50 Zapdos has SO much trouble electrocuting bad guys left and right, and not to mention that a Lv. 128 'M probably scares the living crap out of them and there's no need for PP by the time they run to their mothers. :P

Random references aside, enjoy your rest and go north and through the door. Get your Pokémon back in gear by metaphorically killing the Rocket. Then go up to 10F.

Silph Co. - 10F: That's a Scientist in your face, so beat him up. Then unlock the southern door if you feel that Silph employees shouldn't be locked up for being unable to use Pokémon at a skill equal to ours; had they, we wouldn't be doing all of this work for 'em.

Anyhow, go southwest and beat up the weakling Rocket and snatch up the three items: Carbos, Rare Candy, and TM26 (Earthquake)! Awesome! Earthquake is very easily one of the most powerful moves out there - it is of the Ground type and has a high enough Accuracy to almost guarantee a hit on non-Flying Pokémon.

Silph Co. - 11F: Go southeast and beat up the Rocket. In the nearby room, you can see the Silph Co. president, alongside Giovanni. Well, we can't let this injustice pass. Take the elevator down to 1F and heal outside at the Pokémon Center, then go back to 3F via the elevator.

Silph Co. - 3F: Go west from where the Rocket is near the central table and you'll find a teleporter. Use it.

... And there, you'll find your rival. Couldn't he have bothered to eliminate some of the grunts for us? >_<


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $2,600

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charizard Fire/Flying Level 40 Bulbasaur was your starter
Blastoise Water Level 40 Charmander was your starter
Venusaur Grass/Poison Level 40 Squirtle was your starter
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 35/38 Bulbasaur or Squirtle was your starter
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic Level 35/38 Bulbasaur or Charmander was your starter
Growlithe Fire Level 35/38 Charmander or Squirtle was your starter
Pidgeot Normal/Flying Level 37 None
Alakazam Psychic Level 35 None

  • Charizard is doubly-weak to Rock, and also weak to Electric and Water. It is really advantageous over Grass, Bug, Ice, and Fighting Pokémon, and is probably the most powerful (statistically) of the starter Pokémon.

  • Blastoise is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water moves, and thus is going to hurt Fire, Rock, and Ground moves.

  • Venusaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It'll know Grass moves by now, so avoid using Ground, Water, and Rock Pokémon.

  • Gyarados is doubly-weak to Electric and also weak to Rock. It is immune to Ground, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Growlithe is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It's advantageous over Ice, Grass, and Bug.

  • Exeggcute is doubly-weak to Bug, and also weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Ghost. It has advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, Fighting, and Poison.

  • Pidgeot is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground and Ghost. Avoid using Fighting, Bug, and Grass Pokémon here.

  • Kadabra is weak to Bug and Ghost. It'll have advantages over Poison and Fighting Pokémon.

Those using Venusaur will likely want to have a good Rock Pokémon, Arcanine/Ninetales, and perhaps Haunter/Gengar. Those with Charizard will need a variety of Pokémon: Electrode/Raichu, Victreebel, and Vaporeon should take most of them. Those with Blastoise simply need their starter, Arcanine/Ninetales, and a good Rock Pokémon. Again, another "pinpoint weaknesses" rival fight. >_>

After the battle, your rival leaves. Continue along and speak to the man to receive a Lv. 25 Lapras. Lapras is quite the rare Pokémon; it also a Water/Ice type, meaning, if you've been following this FAQ and haven't traded, that this is the first (partially-) Ice-type you've seen. It's also a pretty decent one, and known canonically for being a good Surf Pokémon due to Ash's use of it in the anime for the Orange Islands saga, so much so that Lapras got a special sprite in X/Y while Surfing while everyone else was generic. =)

... *ahem* Take the bottom teleporter, defeat the final grunt, and check the middle plant for a Revive. Return to 9F for healing if needed, then open the door and let's beat up Giovanni...

...again.


BOSS: Giovanni

  • Rewards: $4,059

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Nidorino Poison Level 37 None
Nidoqueen Poison/Ground Level 41 None
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground Level 37 None
Kangaskhan Normal Level 35 None

  • Nidorino is weak to Psychic and Ground, and advantageous to Grass.

  • Nidoqueen is weak to Psychic and Ground as well, and also Ice and Water. It is immune to Electric, and advantageous over Grass, Electric, Poison, Rock, and Fire.

  • Rhyhorn is doubly weak to Grass and Water, weak to Fighting and Ice, immune to Electric, and advantageous over Rock, Fire, Flying, Electric, Ice, and Poison.

  • Kangaskhan is weak to Fighting and immune to Ghost.

Despite the relative newness in his party (you'll understand why this is eventually), beating Giovanni is still pretty similar to fighting him in the Rocket base in Celadon: Water absolutely dominates for the most part. >_> Grass and Water are the big things you'll want here, and your starter as well if it's not among them. Level 40 should be more than sufficient here, not like it matters: if you beat your rival earlier, this is no problem!


And so, Team Rocket has left the building. Or blasted off again - whichever
you prefer.

Speak with the president to obtain the Master Ball. This is the rarest of rare Pokéballs. This can catch any Pokémon 100% of the time. No other Pokéball can do this except a few specific-situation Pokéballs in other games: you'd better use this one well. (Like for Mewtwo after you beat the game.)

Anyhow, leave.




Saffron City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM31 (Mimic) [_] MarshBadge [_] TM46 (Psywave)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Slowbro Lv. 38
#2 Gastly Lv. 34, Haunter Lv. 34
#3 Kadabra Lv. 31, Kadabra Lv. 31, Mr. Mime Lv. 31, Slowpoke Lv. 31
#4 Haunter Lv. 38
#5 Mr. Mime Lv. 34, Kadabra Lv. 34
#6 Gastly Lv. 33, Gastly Lv. 33, Haunter Lv. 33
#7 Slowpoke Lv. 33, Slowpoke Lv. 33, Slowbro Lv. 33

Saffron City: Heal up at the Pokémon Center, then head to the northwestern part of town,
where some houses were blocked earlier. The top one of those you can enter is the Copycat's house, a child who you find on the top floor.
If you bring her a Poké Doll, she will hand over TM31, Mimic. Anyhow, go to the northeastern corner of town and into the Pokémon Gym: the actual Gym, the eastern one.

Saffron Gym: The puzzle in the Saffron Gym is among the cornerstones of the Pokémon series: pretty much every mainstream game has had some kind of teleporter puzzle in it. The simplest solution to the puzzle (albeit it not the quickest) is to simply go into the teleporter vertically opposite you: that is, go due north or due south into a teleporter. This will make all of the Gym Trainer battles optional (although you can battle them if you want: they will only face to the south) and make you go past all of them a few times. In the center of the 3x3-room structure is the Gym Leader, Sabrina.


BOSS: Gym Leader Sabrina

  • Rewards: $4,257; MarshBadge; TM46 (Psywave)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Kadabra Psychic Level 38 None
Mr. Mime Psychic Level 37 None
Venomoth Bug/Poison Level 38 None
Alakazam Psychic Level 43 None

As with most Gym Battles, you can expect most of the Pokémon to be similarly-oriented. The Psychic Pokémon are weak to Ghost and Bug, whereas Venomoth is weak to Fire, Flying, Rock, and Psychic. They all tend to use Psychic-type moves, which really hurt Poison and Fighting Pokémon.

Overall, a Haunter or Gengar from Pokémon Tower will easily suffice, or perhaps your starter if it's not Venusaur. It's a pretty easy battle anyways at Level 44+. >_>


Once you defeat Sabrina, you'll obtain the MarshBadge and TM46 (Psywave).

Why the MARSHBadge for a Psychic Gym only really near grassy routes? If anything, Fuschia is more suited for a marshy environment. And, in fact, wouldn't SOULBadge make more sense in a Psychic Gym anyways?

Whatever; I don't know Game Freak logic.



VolcanoBadge



Sectional Flowchart



With the SoulBadge - the sixth Gym Badge - ours, it is now time to head to Cinnabar Island, where the seventh Gym resides. As with our trip to Fuschia, there are two ways to go. You can Fly to Pallet Town and go via Route 21, which is very short, but it also deprives you of a number of rewards, the most important of which is undoubtedly Articuno. The other Route is the sea routes to the south of Fuschia City - Routes 19 and 20 - which will cut through the Seafoam Islands dungeon before you get to Cinnabar. Choose whichever you want, I suppose, or go for both even.




Going to Cinnabar Island via Route 21



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Goldeen Water 45 C 67 60 50 63 All
Horsea Water 30 40 70 70 60 All
Magikarp Water 20 10 55 20 80 All
Staryu Water 30 45 55 70 85 All
Tangela Grass 65 55 115 100 60 All
Tentacool Water/Poison 40 40 35 100 70 All
Tentacruel Water/Poison 80 70 65 120 100 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Magikarp Lv. 27, Magikarp Lv. 27, Magikarp Lv. 27, Magikarp Lv. 27, Magikarp Lv. 27, Magikarp Lv. 27
#2 Seaking Lv. 28, Seaking Lv. 28, Goldeen Lv. 28
#3 Seadra Lv. 33, Starmie Lv. 33
#4 Seadra Lv. 33, Tentacruel Lv. 33
#5 Shellder Lv. 31, Cloyster Lv. 31
#6 Seaking Lv. 33, Goldeen Lv. 33
#7 Starmie Lv. 37
#8 Poliwhirl Lv. 32, Seadra Lv. 32, Tentacool Lv. 32
#9 Staryu Lv. 33, Wartortle Lv. 33

Pallet Town: Assuming you're wanting to go to Cinnabar via Route 21, then you need to Fly to Pallet Town and Surf on the waters in the southern portion of the town.

Route 21: Ummm... Surf south and you'll get there. Yeah, that's all there is to it. There are a fair few trainers on the way, but they're easy enough to spot.




Going to Cinnabar Island via the Seafoam Islands: Route 19



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Goldeen Water 45 C 67 60 50 63 All
Horsea Water 30 40 70 70 60 All
Magikarp Water 20 10 55 20 80 All
Staryu Water 30 45 55 70 85 All
Tentacool Water/Poison 40 40 35 100 70 All
Tentacruel Water/Poison 80 70 65 120 100 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Tentacool Lv. 30, Shellder Lv. 30
#2 Goldeen Lv. 29, Staryu Lv. 29, Horsea Lv. 29
#3 Horsea Lv. 30, Horsea Lv. 30
#4 Goldeen Lv. 29, Seaking Lv. 29, Shellder Lv. 29
#5 Horsea Lv. 27, Goldeen Lv. 27, Tentacool Lv. 27, Tentacool Lv. 27
#6 Poliwag Lv. 30, Poliwhirl Lv. 30
#7 Goldeen Lv. 30, Seaking Lv. 30
#8 Poliwag Lv. 27, Poliwag Lv. 27, Goldeen Lv. 27, Goldeen Lv. 27, Seaking Lv. 27
#9 Tentacool Lv. 27, Tentacool Lv. 27, Tentacruel Lv. 27, Horsea Lv. 27, Staryu Lv. 27
#10 Staryu Lv. 29, Staryu Lv. 29, Staryu Lv. 29
#11 Goldeen Lv. 30, Seaking Lv. 30
#12 Shellder Lv. 31, Cloyster Lv. 31
#13 Horsea Lv. 28, Horsea Lv. 28, Horsea Lv. 28, Seadra Lv. 28
#14 Seadra Lv. 30, Seadra Lv. 30, Horsea Lv. 30
#15 Seaking Lv. 35

Fuschia City: Seeing as you want to take the long way to Cinnabar Island, you'll have to Fly to Fuschia City. Go south of the Pokémon Center to the shores of Route 19.

Route 19: Head south and jump the ledges. Finish off the two land Trainers, then Surf onto the water. This part of the Route is quite simple. Just Surf south, then west, to get to the Seafoam Islands. Some battles based on Trainers lie on the way.

When you reach land, defeat the Swimmer outside of the cave. Then enter.




Going to Cinnabar Island via the Seafoam Islands: The Seafoam Islands



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Max Elixer [_] Nugget [_] Ultra Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Articuno (one-time) Ice/Flying 90 85 100 125 85 All
Dewgong Water/Ice 90 70 80 95 70 All
Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 75 90 All
Golduck Water/Psychic 80 82 78 80 85 All
Kingler Water 55 130 115 50 75 All
Krabby Water 30 105 90 25 50 All
Psyduck Water/Psychic 50 52 48 50 55 All
Seel Water 65 45 55 70 45 All
Slowbro Water/Psychic 95 75 110 80 30 Blue/Green
Slowpoke Water/Psychic 90 65 65 40 15 Blue/Green
Zubat Poison/Flying 40 45 35 40 55 All

When you enter, go east and push the Strength boulder into the hole nearby,
then go down after it. Do this two more times with that Strength boulder to
hit some underground water river. It is a fast-flowing river; you can't stop it
and move forward until three boulders lock it. There are two currents here, as
well: one blocking the exit, and the other blocking Articuno.

Southeast, in the only land tile, you'll find a Ultra Ball. Grab it and Surf back to where you'll reach land, then go west and south, then up the ladder. Here, take the ladder to the south up a floor and examine the rock to the east to find a Nugget.

Go back to the previous floor and go around the land to find a few Strength boulders. Examine the standalone rock nearby for a Max Elixer. Now, push the easternmost boulder to the far north, then the one next to it one tile west and one tile south.

Go around the hole and push the other boulder to the far west, then push both boulders into their holes. Jump down one hole and you'll find a blocked current. Surf north to the island and you'll find the Legendary Frost Bird, Articuno. Save and engage it in battle!

Articuno is an Ice/Flying type, one of the three legendary bird Pokémon alongside Zapdos and Moltres. It is weak to Rock (4x), Fire, and Electric, and immune to Ground. As with the general Pokémon capture, it is best to simply weaken it slowly to low HP before using a non-damaging status ailment and then an Ultra Ball. You can use the Master Ball you got from Silph Co., I suppose, but that's better saved for Mewtwo after you beat the game.

After the battle, go to the southern land and use the ladder, then go south and use another ladder, then go northeast and use another, then go southwest and around to another, then east to find a boulder. Push the boulder into the hole like you did at the start to block the current, then go east onto the land. Go up the ladders to leave.

Ahhh... daylight...

...It burns!




Going to Cinnabar Island via the Seafoam Islands: Route 20



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Goldeen Water 45 C 67 60 50 63 All
Horsea Water 30 40 70 70 60 All
Magikarp Water 20 10 55 20 80 All
Staryu Water 30 45 55 70 85 All
Tentacool Water/Poison 40 40 35 100 70 All
Tentacruel Water/Poison 80 70 65 120 100 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Tentacool Lv. 30, Horsea Lv. 30, Seel Lv. 30
#2 Fearow Lv. 30, Fearow Lv. 30, Pidgeotto Lv. 30
#3 Shellder Lv. 30, Shellder, Cloyster Lv. 30
#4 Staryu Lv. 35
#5 Goldeen Lv. 31, Seaking Lv. 31
#6 Poliwag Lv. 31, Seaking Lv. 31

Well, when you exit, sail west and deal with six battles. It is a linear path
to Cinnabar from here.



Cinnabar Island



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM35 (Metronome)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type
All Raichu Electrode Electric
All Tangela Venonat Bug/Poison
All Seel Ponyta Fire
All [none: Dome Fossil] Kabuto Water/Rock
All [none: Helix Fossil] Omanyte Water/Rock
All [none: Old Amber] Aerodactyl Rock/Flying

CINNABAR ISLAND POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Ultra Ball $1,200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x2.0, double that of a normal Poké Ball.
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals 200 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Escape Rope $500 Allows you to escape from certain natural dungeons, like caves.
Max Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.

Welcome to this small city, located on what is apparently a volcanic island.
Not much to do here, but we'll get around to it all pretty fast. Check out the
PokéMart if you want. Heal up at the Pokémon Center, and go into the building
to the left of the Pokémon Center, the Pokémon Lab.

When you enter, the first room on the right has an Electrode that he'll give you for a Raichu. The woman across from him will give you Tangela for your Venonat. In the second room, the scientist hands over TM35 (Metronome). The third room has a Seel he'll give you for Ponyta, which you probably haven't even SEEN yet. (And you can find Seel in the Seaform Islands.) You'll also find the Resurrection Machine. You can give the doctor your Dome Fossil, Helix Fossil, or Old Amber to receive a Lv. 5 Kabuto, Omanyte, or Aerodactyl (respectively) later on. Aerodactyl is especially worthwhile - the Old Amber being found in the museum in Pewter City - although you'll definitely have to raise it up some like you would Abra or Magikarp. >_>

Next stop is the Pokémon Mansion, which is in the northwestern portion of Cinnabar.




The Pokémon Mansion



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Calcium [_] Carbos [_] Escape Rope [_] Full Restore [_] Iron
[_] Max Potion [_] Max Revive [_] Rare Candy [_] Secret Key [_] TM14 (Blizzard)
[_] TM22 (SolarBeam)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Grimer Poison 80 80 50 40 25 All
Growlithe Fire 55 70 45 50 60 Red
Koffing Poison 40 65 95 60 35 All
Magmar Fire 65 95 57 85 93 Blue/Green
Muk Poison 105 105 75 65 50 All
Ponyta Fire 50 85 55 65 90 All
Vulpix Fire 38 41 40 65 65 Blue/Green

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Ninetales Lv. 38
#2 Charmander Lv. 34, Charmeleon Lv. 34
#3 Magnemite Lv. 33, Magneton Lv. 33, Voltorb Lv. 33
#4 Electrode Lv. 29, Weezing Lv. 29
#5 Growlithe Lv. 34, Ponyta Lv. 34
#6 Magnemite Lv. 34, Electrode Lv. 34

When you enter, go north and northeast past the first staircase to find an
Escape Rope. Go into the small room to the west and you'll find a statue, which
actually functions as a switch. They are found throughout the Pokémon Mansion
and open and close the doors, though only for your current floor.

Go up to the second floor and beat the Trainer to the south (you'll need to speak with him). Use the stairs next to the other stairs and go up to find a Burglar to the north.

There are two paths in this room. Examine the dead end of the top one to find a useful Max Revive, and go along the other one to find an also-useful Max Potion. Return to the previous floor.

Go to the eastern portion of the room to find a Calcium. Go up the stairs in the room north of the other two stairwells.

Go to the east to find an Iron in another room. Go back and use the statue switch, then go through the southern door. Beat up the Scientist and you'll note the two ledges nearby. Use the western one.

Upon landing, defeat the nearby Scientist and go between the plants to grab a Carbos. Use the downbound staircase, then go north and into the room on the left. Defeat the Burglar within and get the nearby TM14 (Blizzard), which is a decent move for Articuno, though it doesn't replace Ice Beam's similar power and greater accuracy.

Trigger the statue switch nearby and leave the room to the west. Get the Full Restore on the west wall and go back to the right side of the room, then north through the door. Defeat the Scientist to the north, then trigger the switch in the next room to the north.

Go into the room on the left and snatch the Rare Candy, then go left and grab TM22 (Solarbeam) from the table. Go south to find the Secret Key, which is required to open the doors on the Cinnabar Island's Gym. To exit, use an Escape Rope, Teleport, or return to the Blizzard TM's room and flip the switch there. Go upstairs and north to the exit.




Cinnabar Island Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM39 (Fire Blast) [_] VolcanoBadge

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Growlithe Lv. 36, Vulpix Lv. 36, Ninetales Lv. 36
#2 Vulpix Lv. 36, Vulpix Lv. 36, Ninetales Lv. 36
#3 Ponyta Lv. 34, Vulpix Lv. 34, Growlithe Lv. 34, Charmander Lv. 34
#4 Ponyta Lv. 41
#5 Rapidash Lv. 41
#6 Vulpix Lv. 37, Growlithe Lv. 37
#7 Growlithe Lv. 37, Vulpix Lv. 37

Cinnabar Island: Heal up and head into the Cinnabar Gym.

Cinnabar Gym: This Gym is a Fire-type training Gym. EVERY SINGLE POKÉMON here is of the Fire tyoe - that is no lie. Remember, Water Pokémon are the best, as they resist Fire while having a type-based advantage. Rock Pokémon are the same in this regard.

Tbis Gym is pretty simple, though: you simply must proceed along the path before you, beating the trainers nearest the doors to unlock them. The Gym Leader is in the northwest corner of the Gym.

Exit, heal, and return to the Gym. Speak with Blaine to begin!


BOSS: Gym Leader Blaine

  • Rewards: $4,653; VolcanoBadge; TM39 (Fire Blast)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Growlithe Fire Level 42 None
Ponyta Fire Level 40 None
Rapidash Fire Level 42 None
Arcanine Fire Level 47 None

As usual with Gym Battles, a lot of these Pokémon will rely on the same strategies: they mostly will just stick to Normal- and Fire-type moves. Fire Pokémon - as all of these are - are weak to Water, Ground, and Rock, and Fire moves deal extra damage to Grass, Bug, and Ice.

In general, any well-leveled Fossil Pokémon or other Pokémon will work. If you used a Ground Pokémon in the Fuschia Gym, that works too. It's not a hard battle: you've assuredly been attempting to counter your rival's Fire Pokémon (be it Charizard or Growlithe) for some time now, so you'll be able to manage at Level 47~50.


After this battle, you'll be given the VolcanoBadge and TM38 (Fire Blast). Fire
Blast is an excellent Fire-type move of a power equal to that of Thunder,
Blizzard, and Hydro Pump. It also has the highest accuracy (~85%) of these. It
will make an excellent addition to your Charizard, Arcanine, Ninetales, or Moltres; you'll be getting
the latter in Victory Road.

Seven down, one to go!


EarthBadge



Sectional Flowchart



Yeah... It's basically just Flying to Viridian and entering the Gym. =P




Viridian City Gym



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Revive [_] EarthBadge [_] TM27 (Fissure)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Arbok Lv. 39, Tauros Lv. 39
#2 Machoke Lv. 43
#3 Nidorino Lv. 39, Nidoking Lv. 39
#4 Sandslash Lv. 39, Dugtrio Lv. 39
#5 Machop Lv. 40, Machoke Lv. 40
#6 Rhyhorn Lv. 43
#7 Rhyhorn Lv. 43
#8 Machop Lv. 38, Machoke Lv. 38, Machoke Lv. 38

Cinnabar Island: Heal up in the Pokémon Center, then Fly to Viridian City.

Viridian City: When you were here last, quite a while ago, the Gym was locked and the identity of the leader unknown. The Gym is in the northeast corner of the town, and the Leader has returned. Enter!!

Viridian Gym: So, the eighth Gym Leader has finally come back, but who is he? You'll have to find out by getting to him using the arrows, and if that isn't a big enough hit, proceed to let Hitmonlee repeatedly kick your groin. The type focusing of this Gym is probably meant to be Ground; however, it's actually fairly unpredictable, especially in Gold/Silver and their remakes. Varied teams are an absolute must; your main party's levels should be around Lv. 50.

Use the leftbound arrow tile to find a Tamer. Beat him and and use the arrow tile to the west to go up and beat up a Blackbelt. Go around the wall to the right to find another fight.

Then go south and east to find the middle bit of the Gym. You can skip the three trainers here, but why would you? Go east to find a Revive - the only time you'll ever find an item on the ground in any Pokémon Gym across the series! - then go north and beat the Cooltrainer. Go west and beat the Blackbelt.

Go back to the entrance and go north along the east wall to the northeastern corner of the Gym. Go west and you'll find the leader of the Viridian Gym.


BOSS: Giovanni

  • Rewards: $4,950

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Rhydon Rock/Ground Level 50 None
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground Level 45 None
Nidoking Poison/Ground Level 45 None
Nidoqueen Poison/Ground Level 44 None
Dugtrio Ground Level 42 None

  • Rhyhorn and Rhydon are doubly weak to Grass and Water, weak to Fighting and Ice, immune to Electric, and advantageous over Rock, Fire, Flying, Electric, Ice, and Poison.

  • Nidoqueen and Nidoking are weak to Psychic, Ground, Ice, and Water. They're immune to Electric, and advantageous over Grass, Electric, Poison, Rock, and Fire.

  • Dugtrio is simply weak to Grass, Water, and Ice, immune to Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, Electric, and Poison.

Of the Giovanni battles, this is probably the easiest since he uses a monotyped Pokémon team, which is itself a huge disadvantage if you have a Level 50+ Pokémon that can take advantage of this. Articuno, Vaporeon, Blastoise, Lapras, and Venusaur are among those that should easily pwn most of Giovanni's Pokémon with relative ease.


After the battle, you'll get the eighth and last Kanto Gym Badge, the
EarthBadge, interestingly in the shape of a feather. You also get TM27, Fissure, which is a one-hit kill move that will
not be likely to hit; it's pretty much worthless. >_>

Speak to Giovanni after the battle and he'll vanish, never to be seen again for another two years (in-game; in real life, it's more like fifteen) in the games of HeartGold/SoulSilver as part of a Celebi event that didn't get outside of Japan, as I recall. >_>



To the Pokémon League



Sectional Flowchart






Return to Route 22



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 35 70 Red
Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 40 41 All
Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 40 50 All
Rattata Normal 30 56 35 25 72 All
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

Viridian City: You have finally earned all eight Gym Badges from across the Kanto region. By doing so, you have finally earned the right to challenge the Elite Four at the Indigo Plateau so that you, too, may become the then-world Pokémon Champion, the best trainer in the region! All that stands between you are two Routes, Victory Road, and a lot of skilled Trainers. Heal up in the Pokémon Center and head west onto Route 22.

Route 22: As you try heading west, you'll find your rival. Well, let's give him the honor of being whipped for the seventh time in a row, eh?


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $2,600

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charizard Fire/Flying Level 53 Bulbasaur was your starter
Blastoise Water Level 53 Charmander was your starter
Venusaur Grass/Poison Level 53 Squirtle was your starter
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 45/47 Bulbasaur or Squirtle was your starter
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic Level 45/47 Bulbasaur or Charmander was your starter
Growlithe Fire Level 45/47 Charmander or Squirtle was your starter
Pidgeot Normal/Flying Level 47 None
Alakazam Psychic Level 50 None

  • Charizard is doubly-weak to Rock, and also weak to Electric and Water. It is really advantageous over Grass, Bug, Ice, and Fighting Pokémon, and is probably the most powerful (statistically) of the starter Pokémon.

  • Blastoise is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water moves, and thus is going to hurt Fire, Rock, and Ground moves.

  • Venusaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It'll know Grass moves by now, so avoid using Ground, Water, and Rock Pokémon.

  • Gyarados is doubly-weak to Electric and also weak to Rock. It is immune to Ground, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Growlithe is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It's advantageous over Ice, Grass, and Bug.

  • Exeggcute is doubly-weak to Bug, and also weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Ghost. It has advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, Fighting, and Poison.

  • Pidgeot is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground and Ghost. Avoid using Fighting, Bug, and Grass Pokémon here.

  • Alakazam is weak to Bug and Ghost. It'll have advantages over Poison and Fighting Pokémon.

As usual, this battle mostly devolves into the pinpoint of weaknesses and wise switching. Those using Venusaur will likely want to have a good Rock Pokémon, Arcanine/Ninetales, and perhaps Haunter/Gengar. Those with Charizard will need a variety of Pokémon: Electrode/Raichu, Victreebel, and Vaporeon should take most of them. Those with Blastoise simply need their starter, Arcanine/Ninetales, and a good Rock Pokémon.


Well, after the battle, your rival shall leave you be. You should continue
along the path to find Route 23 and the Badge Check Gates.



Route 23: The Badge Check Gates



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Arbok Poison 60 85 69 65 80 Red
Ditto Normal 48 48 48 48 48 All
Ekans Poison 35 60 44 40 55 Red
Fearow Normal/Flying 65 90 65 61 100 All
Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 30 40 Blue/Green
Sandslash Ground 75 100 110 55 65 Blue/Green
Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 31 70 All

The path is actually pretty linear: its main purpose is to get you to show off your Gym Badges to the eight guards on the way. Head north once you pass the initial
building. Once you show off the SoulBadge, you'll need to start Surfing for a bit. Continue on into the final trial before the Pokémon League - Victory Road -
after you show off your EarthBadge.



Victory Road



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Full Heal [_] Guard Spec. [_] Max Revive [_] Rare Candy [_] TM05 (Mega Punch)
[_] TM17 (Submission) [_] TM43 (Sky Attack) [_] TM47 (Explosion)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Geodude Rock/Ground 40 80 100 30 20 All
Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 75 90 All
Graveler Rock/Ground 55 95 115 45 35 All
Machoke Fighting 80 100 70 50 45 All
Machop Fighting 70 80 50 35 35 All
Marowak Ground 60 80 110 50 45 All
Moltres (one-time) Fire/Flying 90 100 90 125 90 All
Onix Rock/Ground 35 45 160 30 70 All
Venomoth Poison/Bug 70 65 60 90 90 All
Zubat Poison/Flying 40 45 35 40 55 All

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer # Pokémon Party
#1 Persian Lv. 44, Ninetales Lv. 44
#2 Ivysaur Lv. 42, Charmeleon Lv. 42, Wartortle Lv. 42, Charizard Lv. 42
#3 Machoke Lv. 43, Machoke Lv. 43, Machop Lv. 43
#4 Drowzee Lv. 41, Hypno Lv. 41, Kadabra Lv. 41, Kadabra Lv. 41
#5 Persian Lv. 44, Golduck Lv. 44
#6 Mr. Mime Lv. 48
#7 Exeggutor Lv. 43, Arcanine Lv. 43, Cloyster Lv. 43
#8 Charmeleon Lv. 40, Lickitung Lv. 40, Lapras Lv. 40
#9 Parasect Lv. 43, Dewgong Lv. 43, Chansey Lv. 43
#10 Kingler Lv. 43, Blastoise Lv. 43, Tentacruel Lv. 43
#11 Bellsprout Lv. 43, Weepinbell Lv. 43, Victreebel Lv. 43

Victory Road - 1F: Once you enter, push the nearby Strength boulder one tile south, to the east
wall, two tiles north, east to the wall, north two tiles, east one, and south
one. Go back west and walk on the newly-opened path to the intersection. There,
go east and along the path north. You'll find TM43 (Sky Attack) on the right,
and a Rare Candy on the left. Note that you will obviously need to exit and
re-enter to grab a second item.

Return to the intersection and go west. Defeat the first of eleven tough Trainers, then go past and north to find another one. Go up the ladder nearby to reach 2F.

Victory Road - 2F: Go south and push the Strength boulder south once, west once, south once, and west once to get it on the switch. Get onto the raised ledge and beat the Blackbelt there, then continue along east to find a Juggler. Get off of the platform and go east.

At the wall, head north and west to find a Tamer. Grab the nearby Full Heal after the battle, then go up and around the rock to find another Juggler. Get the nearby TM17 (Submission). Go back to the other side of the rock and use the nearby ladder to find 3F.

Victory Road - 3F: Go northeast and beat the Cooltrainer, then grab the nearby Max Revive. Ignore the Strength boulder and go to the northwest corner of the raised area and use the ladder to go down.

Victory Road - 2F: Beat the nearby Pokémaniac, then go east on the north wall to find a Guard Spec. South of there, you'll find the Legendary Fire Bird, Moltres! Save and engage in battle!

Moltres completes the trio of the legendary bird Pokémon, and is a Fire/Flying Pokémon. It is thusly doubly-weak to Rock, and weak to Electric and Water with a Ground immunity. The general Pokémon-catching strategy applies here: carefully lower the Moltres's HP as much as you can, give out a non-damaging ailment if possible, and then throw an Ultra Ball. A Master Ball might work, too, but, as I've said several times before, it'll be best to just leave that for Mewtwo later on after the game is won.

After the battle, return upstairs.

Victory Road - 3F: Go back to the right where the Strength boulder was. Push it north twice and then west into the wall. Go south and snatch up TM47 (Explosion). Push the Strength boulder south once, west four times, south thrice, and east once to hit the switch. Return to the far right.

Get on the raised ledge and go along the newly-opened path. Defeat the Cooltrainer, then go along the southwest path. Get off of the platform and fight some Trainers to the east.

Now, go past them whilst hugging the southern wall to find a Strength boulder near a hole. Push the boulder in there and follow it. Push it to the far left onto the switch. Go north of there to find TM05 (Mega Punch). Get on the raised ledge and head to the ladder. Use it and continue along to leave Victory Road.




The Indigo Plateau: Preparations for the Elite Four



INDIGO PLATEAU POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Ultra Ball $1,200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x2.0, double that of a normal Poké Ball.
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Max Potion $2,000 Heals all of the HP of one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Full Restore $3,000 Fully restores on Pokémon's HP and cures all ailments from it other than KO.
Max Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.

Once you reach the Indigo Plateau and enter the main lobby, it is time to construct a team for it. We'll focus initially on the Pokémon. As with the Gym Leaders, the Elite Four, other than the Champion, will focus on a single type: you'll see Ice, Fighting, Ghost, and Dragon as the main focuses. Since the Elite Four must be fought and beaten in sequential order, you'll want a team that can take on all of these threats together. I recommend the following party:

  • Moltres, Ninetales, Arcanine, Flareon, or Charizard for a Fire Pokémon
  • Pidgeot or Fearow for a Flying Pokémon, or Kadabra or Alakazam for a Psychic Pokémon
  • Haunter or Gengar for a Ghost Pokémon
  • Lapras or Articuno for an Ice Pokémon
  • Zapdos, Raichu, or Electrode for an Electric Pokémon
  • Your starter if not already named, and perhaps Dragonite if it's already taking up a slot

In terms of items, I recommend the following:

  • Full Restore x10
  • Hyper Potion x20
  • Full Heal x15
  • Revive x15

That's based on the assumption you're of a proper level - that is, 60~70 or higher. If you're lower, either grind in Victory Road or buy more items (and thus use them more frequently). In any case, when you're ready...



The Indigo Plateau: Born to be a Winner!



As stated earlier, the four members of the Elite Four, in addition to the Champion, must be fought all in sequential order: if you fail in a battle, you'll start the series all over. The members will always be fought in this order and with these Pokémon as well, with no puzzle to solve to fight them. When you're ready, begin the series that will make you into the Pokémon League Champion!!

BOSS: Elite Four Lorelei

  • Rewards: $5,544

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Dewgong Water/Ice Level 54 None
Slowbro Water/Psychic Level 54 None
Cloyster Water/Ice Level 53 None
Lapras Water/Ice Level 56 None
Jynx Psychic/Ice Level 56 None

  • Dewgong is weak to Rock, Grass, Electric, and Fighting. It is most notable for its moves Take Down (Normal) and Aurora Beam (Ice), the latter of which is supereffective on Flying, Grass, Dragon, and Ground Pokémon.

  • Slowbro is weak to Bug, Electric, Grass, and Ghost. It doesn't use much aside from Water Gun, which is supereffective on Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Cloyster is weak to Rock, Grass, Electric, and Fighting. It uses Spike Cannon (Normal) and Aurora Beam (Ice) mostly.

  • Lapras is weak to Grass, Electric, Rock, and Fighting. It can use Body Slam (Normal; may paralyze), Blizzard (Ice), and Hydro Pump (Water). Ice hits Flying, Grass, and Ground supereffectively whereas Water hits Fire, Rock, and Ground supereffectively. These two moves gain a 50% damage bonus (STAB), so look out for those in particular.

  • Jynx is weak to Fire, Ghost, Bug, and Rock. It'll mostly use Ice Punch (Normal), DoubleSlap (Normal), Body Slam (Normal), and Thrash (Normal), so nothing of note.

For this battle, a good Electric Pokémon will sweep 4/5 of the team, with Jynx being the only remote problem. A good Fire or Ghost Pokémon will do fine there.


BOSS: Elite Four Bruno

  • Rewards: $5,742

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Onix Rock/Ground Level 53 None
Onix Rock/Ground Level 53 None
Hitmonchan Fighting Level 55 None
Hitmonlee Fighting Level 55 None
Machamp Fighting Level 58 None

  • Both of the Onix are doubly-weak to Grass and Water, and also weak to Fighting and Ice, and immune to Electric. They mostly focus on Rock Throw (Rock), Slam (Normal), and Rage (Dragon). Rock Throw is supereffective on Flying, Ice, Fire, and Bug, whereas Dragon is only supereffective on Dragon.

  • Hitmonchan is weak to Flying and Psychic. It'll use Mega Punch (Normal), ThunderPunch (Electric), and Ice Punch (Ice); Electric is supereffective on Water and Flying, whereas Ice is on Dragon, Flying, Grass, and Ground.

  • Hitmonlee is also weak to Flying and Psychic. It uses Mega Kick (Normal), Hi Jump Kick (Fighting), and Jump Kick (Fighting), mostly. Fighting is supereffective on Normal, Rock, and Ice.

  • Machamp also is weak to Flying and Psychic. It mostly uses Submission for damage (Fighting move), and it can use Fissure for a rare one-hit-KO, though it only works on Pokémon lower-leveled than the user, assuming it hits at all.

For this battle, you can take care of the two Onix with a good Water or Grass Pokémon, and the Fighting Pokémon with a good Flying or Psychic Pokémon.


BOSS: Elite Four Agatha

  • Rewards: $5,940

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Gengar Ghost/Poison Level 56 None
Haunter Ghost/Poison Level 56 None
Golbat Poison/Flying Level 56 None
Arbok Poison Level 58 None
Gengar Ghost/Poison Level 60 None

  • The two Gengar are fairly identical. They're both weak to Ghost, Psychic, and Ground, and immune to Normal and Fighting. The lower-leveled one focuses on Hypnosis-Dream Eater combos, while the other one likes to use Night Shade (exactly 60 damage here) and Toxic.

  • Haunter is the de-evolution of Gengar, and is essentially the same as the Level 56 Gengar. >_>

  • Golbat is weak to Rock, Ice, Electric, and Psychic, and immune to Ground. It uses Wing Attack, a Flying move (supereffective on Grass, Fighting, and Bug) most of the time.

  • Arbok is weak to Psychic and Ground, and has no moves of note.

The main thing to use in this battle would be a good Psychic or Ghost Pokémon, really. A Rock/Ground Pokémon could also get some work done.


BOSS: Elite Four Lance

  • Rewards: $6,138

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 58 None
Aerodactyl Rock/Flying Level 60 None
Dragonair Dragon Level 56 None
Dragonair Dragon Level 56 None
Dragonite Dragon/Flying Level 62 None

  • Gyarados is doubly-weak to Electric, weak to Rock, and immune to Ground. It mostly uses Dragon Rage (40 damage), Hydro Pump (Water), and Hyper Beam (Normal with a recharge turn).

  • Aerodactyl is weak to Ice, Electric, and Water, and immune to Ground. It uses Bite (Normal), Take Down (Normal), and Hyper Beam (Normal), most notably, so no STAB moves to beware of. >_>

  • Dragonair is weak to Ice and Dragon. The two Dragonair are the same, too: they use Slam (Normal), Dragon Rage (40 damage), and Hyper Beam (Normal) mostly.

  • Dragonite is the big threat usually. It is doubly-weak to Ice and also weak to Dragon and Rock with an immune to Ground. As with the others, it uses Hyper Beam, and can also use Slam, both of which are normal moves.

Here, an Ice Pokémon will prevail very easily, since none of the Pokémon seem to have any kind of move that would counter it, even Aerodactyl of whom that would be expected. >_>


BOSS: Your Rival

  • Rewards: $6,435

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Charizard Fire/Flying Level 65 Bulbasaur was your starter
Blastoise Water Level 65 Charmander was your starter
Venusaur Grass/Poison Level 65 Squirtle was your starter
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 61/63 Bulbasaur or Squirtle was your starter
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic Level 61/63 Bulbasaur or Charmander was your starter
Arcanine Fire Level 61/63 Charmander or Squirtle was your starter
Pidgeot Normal/Flying Level 61 None
Rhydon Rock/Ground Level 61 None
Alakazam Psychic Level 59 None

  • Charizard is doubly-weak to Rock, and also weak to Electric and Water. It is really advantageous over Grass, Bug, Ice, and Fighting Pokémon, and is probably the most powerful (statistically) of the starter Pokémon.

  • Blastoise is weak to Electric and Grass. It by now knows Water moves, and thus is going to hurt Fire, Rock, and Ground moves.

  • Venusaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It'll know Grass moves by now, so avoid using Ground, Water, and Rock Pokémon.

  • Gyarados is doubly-weak to Electric and also weak to Rock. It is immune to Ground, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Arcanine is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It's advantageous over Ice, Grass, and Bug.

  • Exeggutor is doubly-weak to Bug, and also weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Ghost. It has advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, Fighting, and Poison.

  • Pidgeot is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground and Ghost. Avoid using Fighting, Bug, and Grass Pokémon here.

  • Rhydon is doubly-weak to Water and Grass, weak to Fighting and Ice, and immune to Electric. It has type advantages over Flying, Ice, Fire, Electric, Rock, and Poison.

  • Alakazam is weak to Bug and Ghost. It'll have advantages over Poison and Fighting Pokémon.

As usual, this battle mostly devolves into the pinpoint of weaknesses and wise switching. Those using Venusaur will likely want to have a good Rock Pokémon, Arcanine/Ninetales, and perhaps Haunter/Gengar. Those with Charizard will need a variety of Pokémon: Electrode/Raichu, Victreebel, and Vaporeon should take most of them. Those with Blastoise simply need their starter, Arcanine/Ninetales, and a good Rock Pokémon.


After you defeat the now-disappointed rival of yours, Professor Oak will appear
and bring you to the next room, thereby registering you into the Hall of Fame.

Congratulations on beating the main storyline of Pokémon Red, Blue, and Green Versions!! =D



Post-Credits: Finding Mewtwo



Sectional Flowchart






An Introduction & Important Notes



So, you've finally conquered the eight Gyms of the Kanto region, defeated the Elite Four and became Champion, and even ousted Team Rocket from the Kanto region for another two years. Despite this, there is still one thing left for you to do. "One" thing is far less than what most Pokémon games offer, but it would nonetheless be required to complete the Pokédex. That is the capture of the experimental Pokémon Mewtwo, the Pokémon born from Mew when crazed Kanto scientists forced Mew to give live birth in the Pokémon Mansion. As a result of numerous torturous experiments, Mewtwo grew apathetic of the human species and chose to live in solitude. None know where he resides, supposedly.

In reality, he resides in Cerulean Cave, a place accessible from Route 24 north of Cerulean via Surfing. The main reason I make this section is this, a little-acknowledged (if at all) fact in the Pokémon FAQs for GameFAQs, and is only something I myself recently learned about thanks to Serebii. Apparently, the Cerulean Cave you play will differ depending on which Pokémon release you play. The Japanese Pokémon Red/Green were given their own Cerulean Cave, which was changed in all outside-of-Japan releases of Pokémon Red and all Pokémon Blue cartridges (even the one that was later released in Japan).

Thus, it is very important you know which Cerulean Cave you use. You will use [[Cerulean Cave: Non-Japanese Pokémon Red/Blue & Japanese Pokémon Blue (Pocket Monsters Ao)|this one]] if you're playing Pokémon Blue (any language), or Pokémon Red in a non-Japanese language. Otherwise, you will use [[Cerulean Cave: Japanese Pokémon Red/Green (Pocket Monsters Aka/Midori)|this one]] for you are playing the Japanese releases of Pocket Monsters Aka or Midori, which later became known as Pokémon Red and Green. Understand? Why they chose to do this is far beyond me, but they did it nonetheless and I therefore am obligated to provide both.




Cerulean Cave: Non-Japanese Pokémon Red/Blue & Japanese Pokémon Blue (Pocket Monsters Ao)



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Full Restore [_] Full Restore [_] Max Elixer [_] Max Revive [_] Nugget
[_] PP Up [_] Ultra Ball [_] Ultra Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Arbok Poison 60 85 69 65 80 Red
Chansey Normal 250 5 5 105 50 All
Ditto Normal 48 48 48 48 48 All
Dodrio Normal/Flying 60 110 70 60 100 All
Electrode Electric 60 50 70 80 140 All
Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 75 90 All
Hypno Psychic 85 73 70 115 67 All
Kadabra Psychic 40 35 30 120 105 All
Magneton Electric 50 60 95 120 70 All
Marowak Ground 60 80 110 50 45 All
Mewtwo (one-time) Psychic 106 110 90 154 130 All
Parasect Bug/Grass 60 95 80 80 30 All
Raichu Electric 60 90 55 90 100 All
Rhydon Rock/Ground 105 130 120 45 40 All
Sandslash Ground 75 100 110 55 65 Blue
Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 All
Wigglytuff Normal 140 70 45 50 45 All

Okay, then. Go north and Surf towards the ladder. Go up it, then go south to
find a PP Up to the east. Go back down to the first floor and Surf to the west
to find a Max Elixer.

Go north at the split in the path to find a Nugget and ladder. Also get the Full Restore, then return to the fork and go southwest to find another Full Restore. Continue along to the convergence.

There, go south along the west wall and go up the ladder. Here, go east, south, and west to find an Ultra Ball. Go north and down the ladder, then repeat.

Here on the bottom floor, go to the far east to find a Max Revive. Go back and use the twisty path to find a platform above the water. Get the Ultra Ball on it, then go along the water to find the ever-dangerous Mewtwo! Save and battle him!

Mewtwo is the Pokémon I've designated multiple times throughout the FAQ as being the one for whom you should save the Master Ball. If you haven't (there's no other reason beyond this to use it), you should be aware of the fact that Mewtwo is a Psychic Pokémon and thus weak to Ghost and Bug. It can also use Recover, so lowering its HP is going to be difficult: bringing a Pokémon that knows a move that induces Sleep (Hypnosis or Sleep Powder) will aid as long as they're decently fast as well. In doing so, you'll get Mewtwo to low HP and stop him from healing it, and Sleep also doubles the catch rate. It may be temporal, but it's still the best time to throw out an Ultra Ball and hope for the best.




Cerulean Cave: Japanese Pokémon Red/Green (Pocket Monsters Aka/Midori)



TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Full Restore [_] Full Restore [_] Max Elixer [_] Max Revive [_] Nugget
[_] PP Up [_] Rare Candy [_] Ultra Ball [_] Ultra Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Stat EXP. Yield / Base Stats Version
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Arbok Poison 60 85 69 65 80 Red
Chansey Normal 250 5 5 105 50 All
Ditto Normal 48 48 48 48 48 All
Dodrio Normal/Flying 60 110 70 60 100 All
Electrode Electric 60 50 70 80 140 All
Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 75 90 All
Hypno Psychic 85 73 70 115 67 All
Kadabra Psychic 40 35 30 120 105 All
Magneton Electric 50 60 95 120 70 All
Marowak Ground 60 80 110 50 45 All
Mewtwo (one-time) Psychic 106 110 90 154 130 All
Parasect Bug/Grass 60 95 80 80 30 All
Raichu Electric 60 90 55 90 100 All
Rhydon Rock/Ground 105 130 120 45 40 All
Sandslash Ground 75 100 110 55 65 Green
Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 All
Wigglytuff Normal 140 70 45 50 45 All

When you initially arrive in the cave, go north and Surf on the water, and continue north to the ladder. Upstairs, follow the path to a Full Restore, then go back to the previous floor. Surf further to the west and along the river to find another ladder. Pick up the nearby Nugget, then ignore the ladder and go south to find another. Follow the 2F path it gives you to find a PP Up. Return to the lower floor and go south and downstairs.

At the bottom, grab the Full Restore, then go east and upstairs and along the path. You'll soon encounter a ladder, which takes you to a linear path on the next floor to an Ultra Ball. Northwest of the ladder, you can find a Max Elixer, then further to the southwest is a standalone rock. Examine it for a Rare Candy, then go east and use the ladder there. On the labyrinth-like second floor, simply go south, east, and east at the forks to reach a ladder to a third floor.

Here, go north and east along the path given to you. As you reach the northeast corner, you can go north to find a Max Revive, then go south for a while along the path. This will eventually take you onto a ledge, on the northeast corner of which lies an Ultra Ball. Go west and downstairs from there, then continue following the path onto another ledge. Ascend it, then proceed to the edge of the water. Go west whilst Surfing and then ascend onto the next platform, upon which lies Mewtwo! Save and begin the battle!!

Mewtwo is the Pokémon I've designated multiple times throughout the FAQ as being the one for whom you should save the Master Ball. If you haven't (there's no other reason beyond this to use it), you should be aware of the fact that Mewtwo is a Psychic Pokémon and thus weak to Ghost and Bug. It can also use Recover, so lowering its HP is going to be difficult: bringing a Pokémon that knows a move that induces Sleep (Hypnosis or Sleep Powder) will aid as long as they're decently fast as well. In doing so, you'll get Mewtwo to low HP and stop him from healing it, and Sleep also doubles the catch rate. It may be temporal, but it's still the best time to throw out an Ultra Ball and hope for the best.





Items Listings

Medicinal Items

Item Effect
Antidote Cures Poisoning and Bad Poisoning (PSN) from a Pokémon
Awakening Cures Sleep (SLP) from a Pokémon
Burn Heal Cures Burns (BRN) from a Pokémon
Elixer Heals 10 PP to every move of a Pokémon
Ether Heals 10 PP to one move of one Pokémon
Fresh Water Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon
Full Heal Cures all status ailments, except KO
Full Restore Fully restores one Pokémon's HP and cures all ailments (except KO)
Hyper Potion Restores one Pokémon's HP by 200 points
Ice Heal Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status from one Pokémon
Lemonade Restores one Pokémon's HP by 80 points
Max Elixer Restores all of the PP for all of one Pokémon's moves
Max Ether Restores all of the PP to one Pokémon's move
Max Potion Fully restores the HP of one Pokémon
Max Revive Revives a Pokémon from KO with full HP
Parlyz Heal Cures Paralysis (PLZ) from one Pokémon
Poké Flute Normally used to wake up Snorlax on a couple of Routes, you can also use it in battle to instantly wake up your Pokémon!
Potion Restores 20 HP to a Pokémon
Revive Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% HP
Soda Pop Restores 60 HP to a Pokémon
Super Potion Restores 50 HP to a Pokémon


Vitamins

For those who have no idea what Vitamins are, Vitamins are items designed to augment your Stat Experience; you can see the linked-to section for further details. Vitamins will boost your Stat EXP. and in turn help bolster the growth in that stat; they can only bring you up to 25,600 EXP. though, and beyond that you're on your own.


Item Stat Affected Stat EXP. Change
HP Up Maximum HP +2,560
Protein Attack +2,560
Iron Defense +2,560
Calcium Special +2,560
Carbos Speed +2,560


Other Stat-Boosting Items

Item Name Effect
PP Max Boosts the maximum PP of a move by 60%, or up to 60% of its unaltered max. Will not work if it is already at 160% of the norm.
PP Up Boosts the maximum PP of a move by 20%. Will not work if it is already at 160% of the norm.
Rare Candy Causes an instant level-up, if the Pokémon is under Level 100. (It's most effective, EXP.-wise, just after a level-up.)


Battle Items

Item Effect
Dire Hit Increases the critical-hit ratio by 1 stage until the Pokémon is KO'ed, switched out, or the battle ends
Guard Spec. Prevents stat reductions on your party for five turns
X Accuracy Makes all of the Pokémon's moves certain to hit until being KO'ed or switched or winning; even OHKO moves will hit!
X Attack Increases a Pokémon's Attack by 1 stage until the Pokémon is KO'ed, switched out, or the battle ends
X Defend Increases a Pokémon's Defense by 1 stage until the Pokémon is KO'ed, switched out, or the battle ends
X Special Increases a Pokémon's Special Attack by 1 stage until the Pokémon is KO'ed, switched out, or the battle ends
X Speed Increases a Pokémon's Speed by 1 stage until the Pokémon is KO'ed, switched out, or the battle ends


Pokéballs

The type of Pokéball you use when capturing Pokémon will naturally affect the ability of that Pokémon to be captured. While most later games use more complex mechanics, in Red/Blue/Green/Yellow, it's a simple multiplier effect, as below. (Well, actually, it affects the RNG, but these are the results borne from it.) The Master Ball will catch essentially any Pokémon within reason; you'd have to hack the game to be able to defy it, or just use it on a Trainer's Pokémon. >_>


Pokéball Type Catch Rate
Poké Ball x1.0
Great Ball x1.5
Safari Ball x2.0
Ultra Ball x2.0
Master Ball x255.0


Pokémon Fossils

POKÉMON FOSSIL POKÉMON REVIVED TYPE BASE STATS
Max HP Attack Defense Special Speed
Dome Fossil Kabuto Rock/Water 30 80 90 45 55
Helix Fossil Omanyte Rock/Water 35 40 100 90 35
Old Amber Aerodactyl Rock/Flying 80 105 65 60 130


Evolution Items

Item Pokémon Used On How to Use Item Resultant Pokémon
Fire Stone Vulpix Immediate use Ninetales
Growlithe Immediate use Arcanine
Eevee Immediate use Flareon
Leaf Stone Gloom Immediate use Vileplume
Weepinbell Immediate use Victreebel
Exeggcute Immediate use Exeggutor
Moon Stone Nidorina Immediate use Nidoqueen
Nidorino Immediate use Nidoking
Clefairy Immediate use Clefable
Jigglypuff Immediate use Wigglytuff
Thunderstone Pikachu Immediate use Raichu
Eevee Immediate use Jolteon
Water Stone Poliwhirl Immediate use Poliwrath
Shellder Immediate use Cloyster
Staryu Immediate use Starmie
Eevee Immediate use Vaporeon


Miscellaneous

Item Effect
Escape Rope Allows instant escape from most dungeons, notably caverns
Max Repel Prevents wild encounters for 250 steps
Nugget Useful only to sell for $5,000
Repel Prevents wild encounters for 100 steps
Super Repel Prevents wild encounters for 200 steps (the most cost-effective option)




Shop Data

Viridian City

VIRIDIAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.


Pewter City

PEWTER CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Escape Rope $550 Allows you to instantly escape natural dungeons, like caves.


Cerulean City

CERULEAN CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Potion $300 Heals 20 HP to a single Pokémon.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Repel $350 Prevents wild Pokémon encounters for 100 steps.


Vermilion City

VERMILION CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Ball $200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of 1.0x, the baseline.
Super Potion $700 Heal 50 HP to a single Pokémon.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status ailment.
Awakening $200 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status ailment.
Repel $350 Prevents wild Pokémon encounters for 100 steps.


Lavender Town

LAVENDER TOWN POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon: has a catch rate of x1.5, 50% better than a Poké Ball.
Super Potion $700 Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO/Faint (FNT) with ~50% of their HP.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Escape Rope $500 Allows you to escape from certain dungeons, like caves.
Super Repel $500 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps: the most cost-effective Repel.


Celadon City

CELADON DEPARTMENT STORE
Department Store: 2F Stocks (Left Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
TM32 (Double Team) $1,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM33 (Reflect) $1,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM02 (Razor Wind) $2,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM07 (Horn Drill) $2,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM37 (Egg Bomb) $2,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM01 (Mega Punch) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM05 (Mega Kick) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM09 (Take Down) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
TM17 (Submission) $3,000 Teaches the named move to a Pokémon, if possible. Has only one use.
Department Store: 2F Stocks (Right Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon: has a catch rate of x1.5, 50% better than a Poké Ball.
Super Potion $700 Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO/Faint (FNT) with ~50% of their HP.
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status ailment.
Parlyz Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PRZ) status ailment.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status ailment.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status ailment.
Super Repel $500 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps: the most cost-effective Repel.
Department Store: 4F Stocks
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Poké Doll $1,000 Allows instant-escape from non-Trainer battles.
Fire Stone $2,100 Evolves Vulpix, Growlithe, and Eevee (into Ninetales, Arcanine, and Flareon)
ThunderStone $2,100 Evolves Pikachu and Eevee (into Raichu and Jolteon)
Water Stone $2,100 Evolves Poliwhirl, Shellder, Staryu, and Eevee (into Poliwrath, Cloyster, Starmie, and Vaporeon)
Leaf Stone $2,100 Evolves Gloom, Weepinbell, and Exeggcute (into Vileplume, Victreebel, and Exeggutor)
Department Store: 5F Stocks (Left Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
HP Up $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's HP Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Protein $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Attack Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Iron $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Defense Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Calcium $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Special Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Carbos $9,800 Boosts one Pokémon's Speed Stat Experience by 2,560 points, up to 25,600 points.
Department Store: 5F Stocks (Right Vendor)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
X Attack $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Attack stat in battle.
X Defend $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Defense stat in battle.
X Speed $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Speed stat in battle.
X Special $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's Defense stat in battle.
X Accuracy $550 Boosts the current Pokémon's accuracy in battle so that their moves always hit.
Guard Spec. $700 Prevents the current Pokémon from getting stat changes.
Dire Hit $650 Boosts the current Pokémon's critical-hit rate in battle.
Department Store: 6F Stocks (Vending Machines)
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Fresh Water $200 Heals 50 HP to a single Pokémon: noticeably cheaper than a Super Potion.
Soda Pop $300 Heals 60 HP to a single Pokémon.
Lemonade $350 Heals 80 HP to a single Pokémon.

ROCKET GAME CORNER PRIZE EXCHANGE
Left Vendor
Item/Pokémon Cost Version
Abra 120 Coins All
Clefairy 750 Coins All
Nidorina 1,200 Coins Red
Nidorino 1,200 Coins Blue/Green
Middle Vendor
Item/Pokémon Cost Version
Scyther 2,500 Coins Red
Pinsir 2,500 Coins Blue/Green
Dratini 4,600 Coins All
Porygon 6,500 Coins All
Right Vendor
Item/Pokémon Cost Version
TM23 (Dragon Rage) 3,300 Coins All
TM15 (Hyper Beam) 5,500 Coins All
TM50 (Substitute) 7,700 Coins All


Fuschia City

FUSCHIA CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Ultra Ball $1,200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x2.0, double a normal Poké Ball's.
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Super Potion $700 Heals 50 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Super Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps. The most cost-effective Repel.


Saffron City

SAFFRON CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals 200 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Escape Rope $500 Allows you to escape from certain natural dungeons, like caves.
Super Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 200 steps. The most cost-effective Repel.



Cinnabar Island

CINNABAR ISLAND POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Ultra Ball $1,200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x2.0, double that of a normal Poké Ball.
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals 200 HP to one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Escape Rope $500 Allows you to escape from certain natural dungeons, like caves.
Max Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.


Indigo Plateau

INDIGO PLATEAU POKÉMART
Item Name Item Cost Item Effects
Ultra Ball $1,200 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x2.0, double that of a normal Poké Ball.
Great Ball $600 Captures Pokémon. Has a base catch rate of x1.5, 50% more than a normal Poké Ball's.
Max Potion $2,000 Heals all of the HP of one Pokémon.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with ~50% of their HP.
Full Heal $600 Cures all ailments from a Pokémon other than KO.
Full Restore $3,000 Fully restores on Pokémon's HP and cures all ailments from it other than KO.
Max Repel $700 Stops wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.




Mini-Pokédex

Pokémon Stats (General)

This first section of our miniature Pokédex will discuss the following bits of info. They are information useful mostly to the general player: stats, types, abilities, and so on, though you can find comparisons in this [[Pokémon Stats (Stat Comparisons)|this section]]. for a different organization system, though keep in mind parts of the data in this section will be omitted in that section. In any case, we will consider the following info for this section:


  • Pokémon Type: This is used to determine type resistances and weaknesses. Bolded are the Pokémon's types who get added when traded to Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal: for example, Magnemite has its type written as Steel/Electric: it is initially Electric, and becomes Steel/Electric after that trade.

  • Base Stats: The base stats upon which a Pokémon's level-up stats are calculated: not the lowest possible stats. They range from 1 to 255 and can generally be directly compared to see who is better than who in what. 70 ~ 85 is generally called "average"; higher than that (most people aim for 120+) and it's good for that stat. (Note that "Crit%" - the odds of a critical hit, ignoring the boosted rate from moves like Slash - is solely based on base Speed and thus is not included in the Level 100 Base Stats.)

  • Base Level 100 Stats: These are the absolute basal maximum stats a Pokémon can have. In other words, these stats are what the Pokémon has at Level 100 without the account for Stat EXP. or DVs.

  • BST: To clarify this terminology: it is the total of the Pokémon's base stats, a full estimate of their power. There are two scales for this. RBGY (Red, Blue, Green, Yellow) represents the first generation, and GSC+ implies every later game. This is because Special would later become two stats in Gold, Silver, and Crystal. Further, the GSC Base Stat total actually also applies a proper estimate for the defensive role that Special plays and not just the offensive (since physical gets its offensive and defensive shown). Each have their uses.

# SPECIES POKÉMON TYPE BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
HP ATK DEF SPE SPC BST (RBGY) BST (GSC+) Crit% HP ATK DEF SPE SPC BST (RBGY) BST (GSC+)
#001 Bulbasaur Grass/Poison 45 49 49 45 65 253 298 12.7% 200 103 103 95 135 636 731
#002 Ivysaur Grass/Poison 60 62 63 60 80 325 385 15.6% 230 129 131 125 165 780 905
#003 Venusaur Grass/Poison 80 82 83 80 100 425 505 19.5% 270 169 171 165 205 980 1145
#004 Charmander Fire 39 52 43 65 50 249 314 9.8% 188 109 91 135 105 628 763
#005 Charmeleon Fire 58 64 58 80 65 325 405 12.7% 226 133 121 165 135 780 945
#006 Charizard Fire/Flying 78 84 78 100 85 425 525 16.6% 266 173 161 205 175 980 1185
#007 Squirtle Water 44 48 65 43 50 250 293 9.8% 198 101 135 91 105 630 721
#008 Wartortle Water 59 63 80 58 65 325 383 12.7% 228 131 165 121 135 780 901
#009 Blastoise Water 79 83 100 78 85 425 503 16.6% 268 171 205 161 175 980 1141
#010 Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 45 20 175 220 3.9% 200 65 75 95 45 480 575
#011 Metapod Bug 50 20 55 30 25 180 210 4.9% 210 45 115 65 55 490 555
#012 Butterfree Bug/Flying 60 45 50 70 80 305 375 15.6% 230 95 105 145 165 740 885
#013 Weedle Bug/Poison 40 35 30 50 20 175 225 3.9% 190 75 65 105 45 480 585
#014 Kakuna Bug/Poison 45 25 50 35 25 180 215 4.9% 200 55 105 75 55 490 565
#015 Beedrill Bug/Poison 65 80 40 75 45 305 380 8.8% 240 165 85 155 95 740 895
#016 Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 56 35 216 272 6.8% 190 95 85 117 75 562 679
#017 Pidgeotto Normal/Flying 63 60 55 71 50 299 370 9.8% 236 125 115 147 105 728 875
#018 Pidgeot Normal/Flying 83 80 75 91 70 399 490 13.7% 276 165 155 187 145 928 1115
#019 Rattata Normal 30 56 35 72 25 218 290 4.9% 170 117 75 149 55 566 715
#020 Raticate Normal 55 81 60 97 50 343 440 9.8% 220 167 125 199 105 816 1015
#021 Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 70 31 231 301 6.1% 190 125 65 145 67 592 737
#022 Fearow Normal/Flying 65 90 65 100 61 381 481 11.9% 240 185 135 205 127 892 1097
#023 Ekans Poison 35 60 44 55 40 234 289 7.8% 180 125 93 115 85 598 713
#024 Arbok Poison 60 85 69 80 65 359 439 12.7% 230 175 143 165 135 848 1013
#025 Pikachu Electric 35 55 30 90 50 260 350 9.8% 180 115 65 185 105 650 835
#026 Raichu Electric 60 90 55 100 90 395 495 17.6% 230 185 115 205 185 920 1125
#027 Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 40 30 280 320 5.9% 210 155 175 85 65 690 775
#028 Sandslash Ground 75 100 110 65 55 405 470 10.7% 260 205 225 135 115 940 1075
#029 Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 41 40 235 276 7.8% 220 99 109 87 85 600 687
#030 Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 56 55 310 366 10.7% 250 129 139 117 115 750 867
#031 Nidoqueen Poison/Ground 90 82 87 76 75 410 486 14.6% 290 169 179 157 155 950 1107
#032 Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 50 40 233 283 7.8% 202 119 85 105 85 596 701
#033 Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 65 55 310 375 10.7% 232 149 119 135 115 750 885
#034 Nidoking Poison/Ground 81 92 77 85 75 410 495 14.6% 272 189 159 175 155 950 1125
#035 Clefairy Normal 70 45 48 35 60 258 293 11.7% 250 95 101 75 125 646 721
#036 Clefable Normal 95 70 73 60 85 383 443 16.6% 300 145 151 125 175 896 1021
#037 Vulpix Fire 38 41 40 65 65 249 314 12.7% 186 87 85 135 135 628 763
#038 Ninetales Fire 73 76 75 100 100 424 524 19.5% 256 157 155 205 205 978 1183
#039 Jigglypuff Normal 115 45 20 20 25 225 245 4.9% 340 95 45 45 55 580 625
#040 Wigglytuff Normal 140 70 45 45 50 350 395 9.8% 390 145 95 95 105 830 925
#041 Zubat Poison/Flying 40 45 35 55 40 215 270 7.8% 190 95 75 115 85 560 675
#042 Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 90 75 390 480 14.6% 260 165 145 185 155 910 1095
#043 Oddish Grass/Poison 45 50 55 30 75 255 285 14.6% 200 105 115 65 155 640 705
#044 Gloom Grass/Poison 60 65 70 40 85 320 360 16.6% 230 135 145 85 175 770 855
#045 Vileplume Grass/Poison 75 80 85 50 100 390 440 19.5% 260 165 175 105 205 910 1015
#046 Paras Bug/Grass 35 70 55 25 55 240 265 10.7% 180 145 115 55 115 610 665
#047 Parasect Bug/Grass 60 95 80 30 80 345 375 15.6% 230 195 165 65 165 820 885
#048 Venonat Bug/Poison 60 55 50 45 40 250 295 7.8% 230 115 105 95 85 630 725
#049 Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 375 465 17.6% 250 135 125 185 185 880 1065
#050 Diglett Ground 10 55 25 95 45 230 325 8.8% 130 115 55 195 95 590 785
#051 Dugtrio Ground 35 80 50 120 70 355 475 13.7% 180 165 105 245 145 840 1085
#052 Meowth Normal 40 45 35 90 40 250 340 7.8% 190 95 75 185 85 630 815
#053 Persian Normal 65 70 60 115 65 375 490 12.7% 240 145 125 235 135 880 1115
#054 Psyduck Water 50 52 48 55 50 255 310 9.8% 210 109 101 115 105 640 755
#055 Golduck Water 80 82 78 85 80 405 490 15.6% 270 169 161 175 165 940 1115
#056 Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 70 35 260 330 6.8% 190 165 75 145 75 650 795
#057 Primeape Fighting 65 105 60 95 60 385 480 11.7% 240 215 125 195 125 900 1095
#058 Growlithe Fire 55 70 45 60 50 280 340 9.8% 220 145 95 125 105 690 815
#059 Arcanine Fire 90 110 80 95 80 455 550 15.6% 290 225 165 195 165 1040 1235
#060 Poliwag Water 40 50 40 90 40 260 350 7.8% 190 105 85 185 85 650 835
#061 Poliwhirl Water 65 65 65 90 50 335 425 9.8% 240 135 135 185 105 800 985
#062 Poliwrath Water/Fighting 90 85 95 70 70 410 480 13.7% 290 175 195 145 145 950 1095
#063 Abra Psychic 25 20 15 90 105 255 345 20.5% 160 45 35 185 215 640 825
#064 Kadabra Psychic 40 35 30 105 120 330 435 23.4% 190 75 65 215 245 790 1005
#065 Alakazam Psychic 55 50 45 120 135 405 525 26.4% 220 105 95 245 275 940 1185
#066 Machop Fighting 70 80 50 35 35 270 305 6.8% 250 165 105 75 75 670 745
#067 Machoke Fighting 80 100 70 45 50 345 390 9.8% 270 205 145 95 105 820 915
#068 Machamp Fighting 90 130 80 55 65 420 475 12.7% 290 265 165 115 135 970 1085
#069 Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 40 70 270 310 13.7% 210 155 75 85 145 670 755
#070 Weepinbell Grass/Poison 65 90 50 55 85 345 400 16.6% 240 185 105 115 175 820 935
#071 Victreebel Grass/Poison 80 105 65 70 100 420 490 19.5% 270 215 135 145 205 970 1115
#072 Tentacool Water/Poison 40 40 35 70 100 285 355 19.5% 190 85 75 145 205 700 845
#073 Tentacruel Water/Poison 80 70 65 100 120 435 535 23.4% 270 145 135 205 245 1000 1205
#074 Geodude Rock/Ground 40 80 100 20 30 270 290 5.9% 190 165 205 45 65 670 715
#075 Graveler Rock/Ground 55 95 115 35 45 345 380 8.8% 220 195 235 75 95 820 895
#076 Golem Rock/Ground 80 110 130 45 55 420 465 10.7% 270 225 265 95 115 970 1065
#077 Ponyta Fire 50 85 55 90 65 345 435 12.7% 210 175 115 185 135 820 1005
#078 Rapidash Fire 65 100 70 105 80 420 525 15.6% 240 205 145 215 165 970 1185
#079 Slowpoke Water/Psychic 90 65 65 15 40 275 290 7.8% 290 135 135 35 85 680 715
#080 Slowbro Water/Psychic 95 75 110 30 80 390 420 15.6% 300 155 225 65 165 910 975
#081 Magnemite Steel/Electric 25 35 70 45 95 270 315 18.6% 160 75 145 95 195 670 765
#082 Magneton Steel/Electric 50 60 95 70 120 395 465 23.4% 210 125 195 145 245 920 1065
#083 Farfetch'd Normal/Flying 52 65 55 60 58 290 350 11.3% 214 135 115 125 121 710 835
#084 Doduo Normal/Flying 35 85 45 75 35 275 350 6.8% 180 175 95 155 75 680 835
#085 Dodrio Normal/Flying 60 110 70 100 60 400 500 11.7% 230 225 145 205 125 930 1135
#086 Seel Water 65 45 55 45 70 280 325 13.7% 240 95 115 95 145 690 785
#087 Dewgong Water 90 70 80 70 95 405 475 18.6% 290 145 165 145 195 940 1085
#088 Grimer Poison 80 80 50 25 40 275 300 7.8% 270 165 105 55 85 680 735
#089 Muk Poison 105 105 75 50 65 400 450 12.7% 320 215 155 105 135 930 1035
#090 Shellder Water 30 65 100 40 45 280 320 8.8% 170 135 205 85 95 690 775
#091 Cloyster Water/Ice 50 95 180 70 85 480 550 16.6% 210 195 365 145 175 1090 1235
#092 Gastly Ghost/Poison 30 35 30 80 100 275 355 19.5% 170 75 65 165 205 680 845
#093 Haunter Ghost/Poison 45 50 45 95 115 350 445 22.5% 200 105 95 195 235 830 1025
#094 Gengar Ghost/Poison 60 65 60 110 130 425 535 25.4% 230 135 125 225 265 980 1205
#095 Onix Rock/Ground 35 45 160 70 30 340 410 5.9% 180 95 325 145 65 810 955
#096 Drowzee Psychic 60 48 45 42 90 285 327 17.6% 230 101 95 89 185 700 789
#097 Hypno Psychic 85 73 70 67 115 410 477 22.5% 280 151 145 139 235 950 1089
#098 Krabby Water 30 105 90 50 25 300 350 4.9% 170 215 185 105 55 730 835
#099 Kingler Water 55 130 115 75 50 425 500 9.8% 220 265 235 155 105 980 1135
#100 Voltorb Electric 40 30 50 100 55 275 375 10.7% 190 65 105 205 115 680 885
#101 Electrode Electric 60 50 70 140 80 400 540 15.6% 230 105 145 285 165 930 1215
#102 Exeggcute Grass/Psychic 60 40 80 40 60 280 320 11.7% 230 85 165 85 125 690 775
#103 Exeggutor Grass/Psychic 95 95 85 55 125 455 510 24.4% 300 195 175 115 255 1040 1155
#104 Cubone Ground 50 50 95 35 40 270 305 7.8% 210 105 195 75 85 670 745
#105 Marowak Ground 60 80 110 45 50 345 390 9.8% 230 165 225 95 105 820 915
#106 Hitmonlee Fighting 50 120 53 87 35 345 432 6.8% 210 245 111 179 75 820 999
#107 Hitmonchan Fighting 50 105 79 76 35 345 421 6.8% 210 215 163 157 75 820 977
#108 Lickitung Normal 90 55 75 30 60 310 340 11.7% 290 115 155 65 125 750 815
#109 Koffing Poison 40 65 95 35 60 295 330 11.7% 190 135 195 75 125 720 795
#110 Weezing Poison 65 90 120 60 85 420 480 16.6% 240 185 245 125 175 970 1095
#111 Rhyhorn Ground/Rock 80 85 95 25 30 315 340 5.9% 270 175 195 55 65 760 815
#112 Rhydon Ground/Rock 105 130 120 40 45 440 480 8.8% 320 265 245 85 95 1010 1095
#113 Chansey Normal 250 5 5 50 105 415 465 20.5% 610 15 15 105 215 960 1065
#114 Tangela Grass 65 55 115 60 100 395 455 19.5% 240 115 235 125 205 920 1045
#115 Kangaskhan Normal 105 95 80 90 40 410 500 7.8% 320 195 165 185 85 950 1135
#116 Horsea Water 30 40 70 60 70 270 330 13.7% 170 85 145 125 145 670 795
#117 Seadra Water 55 65 95 85 95 395 480 18.6% 220 135 195 175 195 920 1095
#118 Goldeen Water 45 67 60 63 50 285 348 9.8% 200 139 125 131 105 700 831
#119 Seaking Water 80 92 65 68 80 385 453 15.6% 270 189 135 141 165 900 1041
#120 Staryu Water 30 45 55 85 70 285 370 13.7% 170 95 115 175 145 700 875
#121 Starmie Water/Psychic 60 75 85 115 100 435 550 19.5% 230 155 175 235 205 1000 1235
#122 Mr. Mime Psychic 40 45 65 90 100 340 430 19.5% 190 95 135 185 205 810 995
#123 Scyther Bug/Flying 70 110 80 105 55 420 525 10.7% 250 225 165 215 115 970 1185
#124 Jynx Ice/Psychic 65 50 35 95 95 340 435 18.6% 240 105 75 195 195 810 1005
#125 Electabuzz Electric 65 83 57 105 85 395 500 16.6% 240 171 119 215 175 920 1135
#126 Magmar Fire 65 95 57 93 85 395 488 16.6% 240 195 119 191 175 920 1111
#127 Pinsir Bug 65 125 100 85 55 430 515 10.7% 240 255 205 175 115 990 1165
#128 Tauros Normal 75 100 95 110 70 450 560 13.7% 260 205 195 225 145 1030 1255
#129 Magikarp Water 20 10 55 80 20 185 265 3.9% 150 25 115 165 45 500 665
#130 Gyarados Water/Flying 95 125 79 81 100 480 561 19.5% 300 255 163 167 205 1090 1257
#131 Lapras Water/Ice 130 85 80 60 95 450 510 18.6% 370 175 165 125 195 1030 1155
#132 Ditto Normal 48 48 48 48 48 240 288 9.4% 206 101 101 101 101 610 711
#133 Eevee Normal 55 55 50 55 65 280 335 12.7% 220 115 105 115 135 690 805
#134 Vaporeon Water 130 65 60 65 110 430 495 21.5% 370 135 125 135 225 990 1125
#135 Jolteon Electric 65 65 60 130 110 430 560 21.5% 240 135 125 265 225 990 1255
#136 Flareon Fire 65 130 60 65 110 430 495 21.5% 240 265 125 135 225 990 1125
#137 Porygon Normal 65 60 70 40 75 310 350 14.6% 240 125 145 85 155 750 835
#138 Omanyte Rock/Water 35 40 100 35 90 300 335 17.6% 180 85 205 75 185 730 805
#139 Omastar Rock/Water 70 60 125 55 115 425 480 22.5% 250 125 255 115 235 980 1095
#140 Kabuto Rock/Water 30 80 90 55 45 300 355 8.8% 170 165 185 115 95 730 845
#141 Kabutops Rock/Water 60 115 105 80 70 430 510 13.7% 230 235 215 165 145 990 1155
#142 Aerodactyl Rock/Flying 80 105 65 130 60 440 570 11.7% 270 215 135 265 125 1010 1275
#143 Snorlax Normal 160 110 65 30 65 430 460 12.7% 430 225 135 65 135 990 1055
#144 Articuno Ice/Flying 90 85 100 85 125 485 570 24.4% 290 175 205 175 255 1100 1275
#145 Zapdos Electric/Flying 90 90 85 100 125 490 590 24.4% 290 185 175 205 255 1110 1315
#146 Moltres Fire/Flying 90 100 90 90 125 495 585 24.4% 290 205 185 185 255 1120 1305
#147 Dratini Dragon 41 64 45 50 50 250 300 9.8% 192 133 95 105 105 630 735
#148 Dragonair Dragon 61 84 65 70 70 350 420 13.7% 232 173 135 145 145 830 975
#149 Dragonite Dragon/Flying 91 134 95 80 100 500 580 19.5% 292 273 195 165 205 1130 1295
#150 Mewtwo Psychic 106 110 90 130 154 590 720 30.1% 322 225 185 265 313 1310 1575
#151 Mew Psychic 100 100 100 100 100 500 600 19.5% 310 205 205 205 205 1130 1335


Pokémon Stats (Stat Comparisons)



Sectional Flowchart






Introduction & Notes



To some at least, a Pokémon's base stats determines much of its intrinsic value. Base stats are used as an interpretation of the Pokémon's stats' general growth, and in turn their own prowess or value to a given purpose in battle. For example, if you're trying to get a good physical-attacking Pokémon, would not the Pokémon with the highest Attack stat work out well? If you want a good Pokémon to use for Substitutes, would not a good Pokémon have high HP, Defenses, and Speed? Stuff like this does take a lot of consideration in the development of a strategy and a team.

Thus, along with the basic info already elaborated on in the previous section, I have organized the Pokémon by their base stats in the following lists, by each individual stat and the total value of the base stats, with no regards as to the multiple strategies any single Pokémon can have. Remember, "base stat" refers to the stat used in the growth formula calculated upon the Pokémon leveling up, and not the lowest value of the stat: this means one can use a base stat as a general idea of how good the Pokémon is in that stat. Generally, 70~85 are considered "average", with anything above 100 being "good" or "great", and 130 being "obscene", at least from the competitive standpoint. (Those are not the actual terms used, since there are none: they're just relative to the actual values.) The stats that are the subjects of the list at the time will be bolded across all Pokémon, for easier navigation and reading.

Additionally, for a easier-to-see viewpoint, I have included the Pokémon's maximum stats at Level 100 for every stat. This will only account for the basest level of growth: that is to say, without the influence of DVs or Stat EXP. I do it this way so that you can more easily calculate the exact influence of external factors on the given stat: it also allows me to create a Level-100-stat-total column. =P

So, without further ado...




Pokémon by Maximum HP



# SPECIES POKÉMON TYPE BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
HP ATK DEF SPE SPC BST (RBGY) BST (GSC+) Crit% HP ATK DEF SPE SPC BST (RBGY) BST (GSC+)
#113 Chansey Normal 250 5 5 50 105 415 465 20.5% 610 15 15 105 215 960 1065
#143 Snorlax Normal 160 110 65 30 65 430 460 12.7% 430 225 135 65 135 990 1055
#040 Wigglytuff Normal 140 70 45 45 50 350 395 9.8% 390 145 95 95 105 830 925
#131 Lapras Water/Ice 130 85 80 60 95 450 510 18.6% 370 175 165 125 195 1030 1155
#134 Vaporeon Water 130 65 60 65 110 430 495 21.5% 370 135 125 135 225 990 1125
#039 Jigglypuff Normal 115 45 20 20 25 225 245 4.9% 340 95 45 45 55 580 625
#150 Mewtwo Psychic 106 110 90 130 154 590 720 30.1% 322 225 185 265 313 1310 1575
#089 Muk Poison 105 105 75 50 65 400 450 12.7% 320 215 155 105 135 930 1035
#112 Rhydon Ground/Rock 105 130 120 40 45 440 480 8.8% 320 265 245 85 95 1010 1095
#115 Kangaskhan Normal 105 95 80 90 40 410 500 7.8% 320 195 165 185 85 950 1135
#151 Mew Psychic 100 100 100 100 100 500 600 19.5% 310 205 205 205 205 1130 1335
#036 Clefable Normal 95 70 73 60 85 383 443 16.6% 300 145 151 125 175 896 1021
#080 Slowbro Water/Psychic 95 75 110 30 80 390 420 15.6% 300 155 225 65 165 910 975
#103 Exeggutor Grass/Psychic 95 95 85 55 125 455 510 24.4% 300 195 175 115 255 1040 1155
#130 Gyarados Water/Flying 95 125 79 81 100 480 561 19.5% 300 255 163 167 205 1090 1257
#149 Dragonite Dragon/Flying 91 134 95 80 100 500 580 19.5% 292 273 195 165 205 1130 1295
#031 Nidoqueen Poison/Ground 90 82 87 76 75 410 486 14.6% 290 169 179 157 155 950 1107
#059 Arcanine Fire 90 110 80 95 80 455 550 15.6% 290 225 165 195 165 1040 1235
#062 Poliwrath Water/Fighting 90 85 95 70 70 410 480 13.7% 290 175 195 145 145 950 1095
#068 Machamp Fighting 90 130 80 55 65 420 475 12.7% 290 265 165 115 135 970 1085
#079 Slowpoke Water/Psychic 90 65 65 15 40 275 290 7.8% 290 135 135 35 85 680 715
#087 Dewgong Water 90 70 80 70 95 405 475 18.6% 290 145 165 145 195 940 1085
#108 Lickitung Normal 90 55 75 30 60 310 340 11.7% 290 115 155 65 125 750 815
#144 Articuno Ice/Flying 90 85 100 85 125 485 570 24.4% 290 175 205 175 255 1100 1275
#145 Zapdos Electric/Flying 90 90 85 100 125 490 590 24.4% 290 185 175 205 255 1110 1315
#146 Moltres Fire/Flying 90 100 90 90 125 495 585 24.4% 290 205 185 185 255 1120 1305
#097 Hypno Psychic 85 73 70 67 115 410 477 22.5% 280 151 145 139 235 950 1089
#018 Pidgeot Normal/Flying 83 80 75 91 70 399 490 13.7% 276 165 155 187 145 928 1115
#034 Nidoking Poison/Ground 81 92 77 85 75 410 495 14.6% 272 189 159 175 155 950 1125
#003 Venusaur Grass/Poison 80 82 83 80 100 425 505 19.5% 270 169 171 165 205 980 1145
#055 Golduck Water 80 82 78 85 80 405 490 15.6% 270 169 161 175 165 940 1115
#067 Machoke Fighting 80 100 70 45 50 345 390 9.8% 270 205 145 95 105 820 915
#071 Victreebel Grass/Poison 80 105 65 70 100 420 490 19.5% 270 215 135 145 205 970 1115
#073 Tentacruel Water/Poison 80 70 65 100 120 435 535 23.4% 270 145 135 205 245 1000 1205
#076 Golem Rock/Ground 80 110 130 45 55 420 465 10.7% 270 225 265 95 115 970 1065
#088 Grimer Poison 80 80 50 25 40 275 300 7.8% 270 165 105 55 85 680 735
#111 Rhyhorn Ground/Rock 80 85 95 25 30 315 340 5.9% 270 175 195 55 65 760 815
#119 Seaking Water 80 92 65 68 80 385 453 15.6% 270 189 135 141 165 900 1041
#142 Aerodactyl Rock/Flying 80 105 65 130 60 440 570 11.7% 270 215 135 265 125 1010 1275
#009 Blastoise Water 79 83 100 78 85 425 503 16.6% 268 171 205 161 175 980 1141
#006 Charizard Fire/Flying 78 84 78 100 85 425 525 16.6% 266 173 161 205 175 980 1185
#028 Sandslash Ground 75 100 110 65 55 405 470 10.7% 260 205 225 135 115 940 1075
#042 Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 90 75 390 480 14.6% 260 165 145 185 155 910 1095
#045 Vileplume Grass/Poison 75 80 85 50 100 390 440 19.5% 260 165 175 105 205 910 1015
#128 Tauros Normal 75 100 95 110 70 450 560 13.7% 260 205 195 225 145 1030 1255
#038 Ninetales Fire 73 76 75 100 100 424 524 19.5% 256 157 155 205 205 978 1183
#030 Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 56 55 310 366 10.7% 250 129 139 117 115 750 867
#035 Clefairy Normal 70 45 48 35 60 258 293 11.7% 250 95 101 75 125 646 721
#049 Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 375 465 17.6% 250 135 125 185 185 880 1065
#066 Machop Fighting 70 80 50 35 35 270 305 6.8% 250 165 105 75 75 670 745
#123 Scyther Bug/Flying 70 110 80 105 55 420 525 10.7% 250 225 165 215 115 970 1185
#139 Omastar Rock/Water 70 60 125 55 115 425 480 22.5% 250 125 255 115 235 980 1095
#015 Beedrill Bug/Poison 65 80 40 75 45 305 380 8.8% 240 165 85 155 95 740 895
#022 Fearow Normal/Flying 65 90 65 100 61 381 481 11.9% 240 185 135 205 127 892 1097
#053 Persian Normal 65 70 60 115 65 375 490 12.7% 240 145 125 235 135 880 1115
#057 Primeape Fighting 65 105 60 95 60 385 480 11.7% 240 215 125 195 125 900 1095
#061 Poliwhirl Water 65 65 65 90 50 335 425 9.8% 240 135 135 185 105 800 985
#070 Weepinbell Grass/Poison 65 90 50 55 85 345 400 16.6% 240 185 105 115 175 820 935
#078 Rapidash Fire 65 100 70 105 80 420 525 15.6% 240 205 145 215 165 970 1185
#086 Seel Water 65 45 55 45 70 280 325 13.7% 240 95 115 95 145 690 785
#110 Weezing Poison 65 90 120 60 85 420 480 16.6% 240 185 245 125 175 970 1095
#114 Tangela Grass 65 55 115 60 100 395 455 19.5% 240 115 235 125 205 920 1045
#124 Jynx Ice/Psychic 65 50 35 95 95 340 435 18.6% 240 105 75 195 195 810 1005
#125 Electabuzz Electric 65 83 57 105 85 395 500 16.6% 240 171 119 215 175 920 1135
#126 Magmar Fire 65 95 57 93 85 395 488 16.6% 240 195 119 191 175 920 1111
#127 Pinsir Bug 65 125 100 85 55 430 515 10.7% 240 255 205 175 115 990 1165
#135 Jolteon Electric 65 65 60 130 110 430 560 21.5% 240 135 125 265 225 990 1255
#136 Flareon Fire 65 130 60 65 110 430 495 21.5% 240 265 125 135 225 990 1125
#137 Porygon Normal 65 60 70 40 75 310 350 14.6% 240 125 145 85 155 750 835
#017 Pidgeotto Normal/Flying 63 60 55 71 50 299 370 9.8% 236 125 115 147 105 728 875
#033 Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 65 55 310 375 10.7% 232 149 119 135 115 750 885
#148 Dragonair Dragon 61 84 65 70 70 350 420 13.7% 232 173 135 145 145 830 975
#002 Ivysaur Grass/Poison 60 62 63 60 80 325 385 15.6% 230 129 131 125 165 780 905
#012 Butterfree Bug/Flying 60 45 50 70 80 305 375 15.6% 230 95 105 145 165 740 885
#024 Arbok Poison 60 85 69 80 65 359 439 12.7% 230 175 143 165 135 848 1013
#026 Raichu Electric 60 90 55 100 90 395 495 17.6% 230 185 115 205 185 920 1125
#044 Gloom Grass/Poison 60 65 70 40 85 320 360 16.6% 230 135 145 85 175 770 855
#047 Parasect Bug/Grass 60 95 80 30 80 345 375 15.6% 230 195 165 65 165 820 885
#048 Venonat Bug/Poison 60 55 50 45 40 250 295 7.8% 230 115 105 95 85 630 725
#085 Dodrio Normal/Flying 60 110 70 100 60 400 500 11.7% 230 225 145 205 125 930 1135
#094 Gengar Ghost/Poison 60 65 60 110 130 425 535 25.4% 230 135 125 225 265 980 1205
#096 Drowzee Psychic 60 48 45 42 90 285 327 17.6% 230 101 95 89 185 700 789
#101 Electrode Electric 60 50 70 140 80 400 540 15.6% 230 105 145 285 165 930 1215
#102 Exeggcute Grass/Psychic 60 40 80 40 60 280 320 11.7% 230 85 165 85 125 690 775
#105 Marowak Ground 60 80 110 45 50 345 390 9.8% 230 165 225 95 105 820 915
#121 Starmie Water/Psychic 60 75 85 115 100 435 550 19.5% 230 155 175 235 205 1000 1235
#141 Kabutops Rock/Water 60 115 105 80 70 430 510 13.7% 230 235 215 165 145 990 1155
#008 Wartortle Water 59 63 80 58 65 325 383 12.7% 228 131 165 121 135 780 901
#005 Charmeleon Fire 58 64 58 80 65 325 405 12.7% 226 133 121 165 135 780 945
#020 Raticate Normal 55 81 60 97 50 343 440 9.8% 220 167 125 199 105 816 1015
#029 Nidoran Poison 55 47 52 41 40 235 276 7.8% 220 99 109 87 85 600 687
#058 Growlithe Fire 55 70 45 60 50 280 340 9.8% 220 145 95 125 105 690 815
#065 Alakazam Psychic 55 50 45 120 135 405 525 26.4% 220 105 95 245 275 940 1185
#075 Graveler Rock/Ground 55 95 115 35 45 345 380 8.8% 220 195 235 75 95 820 895
#099 Kingler Water 55 130 115 75 50 425 500 9.8% 220 265 235 155 105 980 1135
#117 Seadra Water 55 65 95 85 95 395 480 18.6% 220 135 195 175 195 920 1095
#133 Eevee Normal 55 55 50 55 65 280 335 12.7% 220 115 105 115 135 690 805
#083 Farfetch'd Normal/Flying 52 65 55 60 58 290 350 11.3% 214 135 115 125 121 710 835
#011 Metapod Bug 50 20 55 30 25 180 210 4.9% 210 45 115 65 55 490 555
#027 Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 40 30 280 320 5.9% 210 155 175 85 65 690 775
#054 Psyduck Water 50 52 48 55 50 255 310 9.8% 210 109 101 115 105 640 755
#069 Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 40 70 270 310 13.7% 210 155 75 85 145 670 755
#077 Ponyta Fire 50 85 55 90 65 345 435 12.7% 210 175 115 185 135 820 1005
#082 Magneton Steel/Electric 50 60 95 70 120 395 465 23.4% 210 125 195 145 245 920 1065
#091 Cloyster Water/Ice 50 95 180 70 85 480 550 16.6% 210 195 365 145 175 1090 1235
#104 Cubone Ground 50 50 95 35 40 270 305 7.8% 210 105 195 75 85 670 745
#106 Hitmonlee Fighting 50 120 53 87 35 345 432 6.8% 210 245 111 179 75 820 999
#107 Hitmonchan Fighting 50 105 79 76 35 345 421 6.8% 210 215 163 157 75 820 977
#132 Ditto Normal 48 48 48 48 48 240 288 9.4% 206 101 101 101 101 610 711
#032 Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 50 40 233 283 7.8% 202 119 85 105 85 596 701
#001 Bulbasaur Grass/Poison 45 49 49 45 65 253 298 12.7% 200 103 103 95 135 636 731
#010 Caterpie Bug 45 30 35 45 20 175 220 3.9% 200 65 75 95 45 480 575
#014 Kakuna Bug/Poison 45 25 50 35 25 180 215 4.9% 200 55 105 75 55 490 565
#043 Oddish Grass/Poison 45 50 55 30 75 255 285 14.6% 200 105 115 65 155 640 705
#093 Haunter Ghost/Poison 45 50 45 95 115 350 445 22.5% 200 105 95 195 235 830 1025
#118 Goldeen Water 45 67 60 63 50 285 348 9.8% 200 139 125 131 105 700 831
#007 Squirtle Water 44 48 65 43 50 250 293 9.8% 198 101 135 91 105 630 721
#147 Dratini Dragon 41 64 45 50 50 250 300 9.8% 192 133 95 105 105 630 735
#013 Weedle Bug/Poison 40 35 30 50 20 175 225 3.9% 190 75 65 105 45 480 585
#016 Pidgey Normal/Flying 40 45 40 56 35 216 272 6.8% 190 95 85 117 75 562 679
#021 Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 70 31 231 301 6.1% 190 125 65 145 67 592 737
#041 Zubat Poison/Flying 40 45 35 55 40 215 270 7.8% 190 95 75 115 85 560 675
#052 Meowth Normal 40 45 35 90 40 250 340 7.8% 190 95 75 185 85 630 815
#056 Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 70 35 260 330 6.8% 190 165 75 145 75 650 795
#060 Poliwag Water 40 50 40 90 40 260 350 7.8% 190 105 85 185 85 650 835
#064 Kadabra Psychic 40 35 30 105 120 330 435 23.4% 190 75 65 215 245 790 1005
#072 Tentacool Water/Poison 40 40 35 70 100 285 355 19.5% 190 85 75 145 205 700 845
#074 Geodude Rock/Ground 40 80 100 20 30 270 290 5.9% 190 165 205 45 65 670 715
#100 Voltorb Electric 40 30 50 100 55 275 375 10.7% 190 65 105 205 115 680 885
#109 Koffing Poison 40 65 95 35 60 295 330 11.7% 190 135 195 75 125 720 795
#122 Mr. Mime Psychic 40 45 65 90 100 340 430 19.5% 190 95 135 185 205 810 995
#004 Charmander Fire 39 52 43 65 50 249 314 9.8% 188 109 91 135 105 628 763
#037 Vulpix Fire 38 41 40 65 65 249 314 12.7% 186 87 85 135 135 628 763
#023 Ekans Poison 35 60 44 55 40 234 289 7.8% 180 125 93 115 85 598 713
#025 Pikachu Electric 35 55 30 90 50 260 350 9.8% 180 115 65 185 105 650 835
#046 Paras Bug/Grass 35 70 55 25 55 240 265 10.7% 180 145 115 55 115 610 665
#051 Dugtrio Ground 35 80 50 120 70 355 475 13.7% 180 165 105 245 145 840 1085
#084 Doduo Normal/Flying 35 85 45 75 35 275 350 6.8% 180 175 95 155 75 680 835
#095 Onix Rock/Ground 35 45 160 70 30 340 410 5.9% 180 95 325 145 65 810 955
#138 Omanyte Rock/Water 35 40 100 35 90 300 335 17.6% 180 85 205 75 185 730 805
#019 Rattata Normal 30 56 35 72 25 218 290 4.9% 170 117 75 149 55 566 715
#090 Shellder Water 30 65 100 40 45 280 320 8.8% 170 135 205 85 95 690 775
#092 Gastly Ghost/Poison 30 35 30 80 100 275 355 19.5% 170 75 65 165 205 680 845
#098 Krabby Water 30 105 90 50 25 300 350 4.9% 170 215 185 105 55 730 835
#116 Horsea Water 30 40 70 60 70 270 330 13.7% 170 85 145 125 145 670 795
#120 Staryu Water 30 45 55 85 70 285 370 13.7% 170 95 115 175 145 700 875
#140 Kabuto Rock/Water 30 80 90 55 45 300 355 8.8% 170 165 185 115 95 730 845
#063 Abra Psychic 25 20 15 90 105 255 345 20.5% 160 45 35 185 215 640 825
#081 Magnemite Steel/Electric 25 35 70 45 95 270 315 18.6% 160 75 145 95 195 670 765
#129 Magikarp Water 20 10 55 80 20 185 265 3.9% 150 25 115 165 45 500 665
#050 Diglett Ground 10 55 25 95 45 230 325 8.8% 130 115 55 195 95 590 785



Pokémon by Attack



# SPECIES POKÉMON TYPE BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
HP ATK DEF SPE SPC BST (RBGY) BST (GSC+) Crit% HP ATK DEF SPE SPC BST (RBGY) BST (GSC+)
#149 Dragonite Dragon/Flying 91 134 95 80 100 500 580 19.5% 292 273 195 165 205 1130 1295
#112 Rhydon Ground/Rock 105 130 120 40 45 440 480 8.8% 320 265 245 85 95 1010 1095
#068 Machamp Fighting 90 130 80 55 65 420 475 12.7% 290 265 165 115 135 970 1085
#136 Flareon Fire 65 130 60 65 110 430 495 21.5% 240 265 125 135 225 990 1125
#099 Kingler Water 55 130 115 75 50 425 500 9.8% 220 265 235 155 105 980 1135
#130 Gyarados Water/Flying 95 125 79 81 100 480 561 19.5% 300 255 163 167 205 1090 1257
#127 Pinsir Bug 65 125 100 85 55 430 515 10.7% 240 255 205 175 115 990 1165
#106 Hitmonlee Fighting 50 120 53 87 35 345 432 6.8% 210 245 111 179 75 820 999
#141 Kabutops Rock/Water 60 115 105 80 70 430 510 13.7% 230 235 215 165 145 990 1155
#143 Snorlax Normal 160 110 65 30 65 430 460 12.7% 430 225 135 65 135 990 1055
#150 Mewtwo Psychic 106 110 90 130 154 590 720 30.1% 322 225 185 265 313 1310 1575
#059 Arcanine Fire 90 110 80 95 80 455 550 15.6% 290 225 165 195 165 1040 1235
#076 Golem Rock/Ground 80 110 130 45 55 420 465 10.7% 270 225 265 95 115 970 1065
#123 Scyther Bug/Flying 70 110 80 105 55 420 525 10.7% 250 225 165 215 115 970 1185
#085 Dodrio Normal/Flying 60 110 70 100 60 400 500 11.7% 230 225 145 205 125 930 1135
#089 Muk Poison 105 105 75 50 65 400 450 12.7% 320 215 155 105 135 930 1035
#071 Victreebel Grass/Poison 80 105 65 70 100 420 490 19.5% 270 215 135 145 205 970 1115
#142 Aerodactyl Rock/Flying 80 105 65 130 60 440 570 11.7% 270 215 135 265 125 1010 1275
#057 Primeape Fighting 65 105 60 95 60 385 480 11.7% 240 215 125 195 125 900 1095
#107 Hitmonchan Fighting 50 105 79 76 35 345 421 6.8% 210 215 163 157 75 820 977
#098 Krabby Water 30 105 90 50 25 300 350 4.9% 170 215 185 105 55 730 835
#151 Mew Psychic 100 100 100 100 100 500 600 19.5% 310 205 205 205 205 1130 1335
#146 Moltres Fire/Flying 90 100 90 90 125 495 585 24.4% 290 205 185 185 255 1120 1305
#067 Machoke Fighting 80 100 70 45 50 345 390 9.8% 270 205 145 95 105 820 915
#028 Sandslash Ground 75 100 110 65 55 405 470 10.7% 260 205 225 135 115 940 1075
#128 Tauros Normal 75 100 95 110 70 450 560 13.7% 260 205 195 225 145 1030 1255
#078 Rapidash Fire 65 100 70 105 80 420 525 15.6% 240 205 145 215 165 970 1185
#115 Kangaskhan Normal 105 95 80 90 40 410 500 7.8% 320 195 165 185 85 950 1135
#103 Exeggutor Grass/Psychic 95 95 85 55 125 455 510 24.4% 300 195 175 115 255 1040 1155
#126 Magmar Fire 65 95 57 93 85 395 488 16.6% 240 195 119 191 175 920 1111
#047 Parasect Bug/Grass 60 95 80 30 80 345 375 15.6% 230 195 165 65 165 820 885
#075 Graveler Rock/Ground 55 95 115 35 45 345 380 8.8% 220 195 235 75 95 820 895
#091 Cloyster Water/Ice 50 95 180 70 85 480 550 16.6% 210 195 365 145 175 1090 1235
#034 Nidoking Poison/Ground 81 92 77 85 75 410 495 14.6% 272 189 159 175 155 950 1125
#119 Seaking Water 80 92 65 68 80 385 453 15.6% 270 189 135 141 165 900 1041
#145 Zapdos Electric/Flying 90 90 85 100 125 490 590 24.4% 290 185 175 205 255 1110 1315
#022 Fearow Normal/Flying 65 90 65 100 61 381 481 11.9% 240 185 135 205 127 892 1097
#070 Weepinbell Grass/Poison 65 90 50 55 85 345 400 16.6% 240 185 105 115 175 820 935
#110 Weezing Poison 65 90 120 60 85 420 480 16.6% 240 185 245 125 175 970 1095
#026 Raichu Electric 60 90 55 100 90 395 495 17.6% 230 185 115 205 185 920 1125
#131 Lapras Water/Ice 130 85 80 60 95 450 510 18.6% 370 175 165 125 195 1030 1155
#062 Poliwrath Water/Fighting 90 85 95 70 70 410 480 13.7% 290 175 195 145 145 950 1095
#144 Articuno Ice/Flying 90 85 100 85 125 485 570 24.4% 290 175 205 175 255 1100 1275
#111 Rhyhorn Ground/Rock 80 85 95 25 30 315 340 5.9% 270 175 195 55 65 760 815
#024 Arbok Poison 60 85 69 80 65 359 439 12.7% 230 175 143 165 135 848 1013
#077 Ponyta Fire 50 85 55 90 65 345 435 12.7% 210 175 115 185 135 820 1005
#084 Doduo Normal/Flying 35 85 45 75 35 275 350 6.8% 180 175 95 155 75 680 835
#006 Charizard Fire/Flying 78 84 78 100 85 425 525 16.6% 266 173 161 205 175 980 1185
#148 Dragonair Dragon 61 84 65 70 70 350 420 13.7% 232 173 135 145 145 830 975
#009 Blastoise Water 79 83 100 78 85 425 503 16.6% 268 171 205 161 175 980 1141
#125 Electabuzz Electric 65 83 57 105 85 395 500 16.6% 240 171 119 215 175 920 1135
#031 Nidoqueen Poison/Ground 90 82 87 76 75 410 486 14.6% 290 169 179 157 155 950 1107
#003 Venusaur Grass/Poison 80 82 83 80 100 425 505 19.5% 270 169 171 165 205 980 1145
#055 Golduck Water 80 82 78 85 80 405 490 15.6% 270 169 161 175 165 940 1115
#020 Raticate Normal 55 81 60 97 50 343 440 9.8% 220 167 125 199 105 816 1015
#018 Pidgeot Normal/Flying 83 80 75 91 70 399 490 13.7% 276 165 155 187 145 928 1115
#088 Grimer Poison 80 80 50 25 40 275 300 7.8% 270 165 105 55 85 680 735
#042 Golbat Poison/Flying 75 80 70 90 75 390 480 14.6% 260 165 145 185 155 910 1095
#045 Vileplume Grass/Poison 75 80 85 50 100 390 440 19.5% 260 165 175 105 205 910 1015
#066 Machop Fighting 70 80 50 35 35 270 305 6.8% 250 165 105 75 75 670 745
#015 Beedrill Bug/Poison 65 80 40 75 45 305 380 8.8% 240 165 85 155 95 740 895
#105 Marowak Ground 60 80 110 45 50 345 390 9.8% 230 165 225 95 105 820 915
#056 Mankey Fighting 40 80 35 70 35 260 330 6.8% 190 165 75 145 75 650 795
#074 Geodude Rock/Ground 40 80 100 20 30 270 290 5.9% 190 165 205 45 65 670 715
#051 Dugtrio Ground 35 80 50 120 70 355 475 13.7% 180 165 105 245 145 840 1085
#140 Kabuto Rock/Water 30 80 90 55 45 300 355 8.8% 170 165 185 115 95 730 845
#038 Ninetales Fire 73 76 75 100 100 424 524 19.5% 256 157 155 205 205 978 1183
#080 Slowbro Water/Psychic 95 75 110 30 80 390 420 15.6% 300 155 225 65 165 910 975
#121 Starmie Water/Psychic 60 75 85 115 100 435 550 19.5% 230 155 175 235 205 1000 1235
#027 Sandshrew Ground 50 75 85 40 30 280 320 5.9% 210 155 175 85 65 690 775
#069 Bellsprout Grass/Poison 50 75 35 40 70 270 310 13.7% 210 155 75 85 145 670 755
#097 Hypno Psychic 85 73 70 67 115 410 477 22.5% 280 151 145 139 235 950 1089
#033 Nidorino Poison 61 72 57 65 55 310 375 10.7% 232 149 119 135 115 750 885
#040 Wigglytuff Normal 140 70 45 45 50 350 395 9.8% 390 145 95 95 105 830 925
#036 Clefable Normal 95 70 73 60 85 383 443 16.6% 300 145 151 125 175 896 1021
#087 Dewgong Water 90 70 80 70 95 405 475 18.6% 290 145 165 145 195 940 1085
#073 Tentacruel Water/Poison 80 70 65 100 120 435 535 23.4% 270 145 135 205 245 1000 1205
#053 Persian Normal 65 70 60 115 65 375 490 12.7% 240 145 125 235 135 880 1115
#058 Growlithe Fire 55 70 45 60 50 280 340 9.8% 220 145 95 125 105 690 815
#046 Paras Bug/Grass 35 70 55 25 55 240 265 10.7% 180 145 115 55 115 610 665
#118 Goldeen Water 45 67 60 63 50 285 348 9.8% 200 139 125 131 105 700 831
#134 Vaporeon Water 130 65 60 65 110 430 495 21.5% 370 135 125 135 225 990 1125
#079 Slowpoke Water/Psychic 90 65 65 15 40 275 290 7.8% 290 135 135 35 85 680 715
#049 Venomoth Bug/Poison 70 65 60 90 90 375 465 17.6% 250 135 125 185 185 880 1065
#061 Poliwhirl Water 65 65 65 90 50 335 425 9.8% 240 135 135 185 105 800 985
#135 Jolteon Electric 65 65 60 130 110 430 560 21.5% 240 135 125 265 225 990 1255
#044 Gloom Grass/Poison 60 65 70 40 85 320 360 16.6% 230 135 145 85 175 770 855
#094 Gengar Ghost/Poison 60 65 60 110 130 425 535 25.4% 230 135 125 225 265 980 1205
#117 Seadra Water 55 65 95 85 95 395 480 18.6% 220 135 195 175 195 920 1095
#083 Farfetch'd Normal/Flying 52 65 55 60 58 290 350 11.3% 214 135 115 125 121 710 835
#109 Koffing Poison 40 65 95 35 60 295 330 11.7% 190 135 195 75 125 720 795
#090 Shellder Water 30 65 100 40 45 280 320 8.8% 170 135 205 85 95 690 775
#005 Charmeleon Fire 58 64 58 80 65 325 405 12.7% 226 133 121 165 135 780 945
#147 Dratini Dragon 41 64 45 50 50 250 300 9.8% 192 133 95 105 105 630 735
#008 Wartortle Water 59 63 80 58 65 325 383 12.7% 228 131 165 121 135 780 901
#030 Nidorina Poison 70 62 67 56 55 310 366 10.7% 250 129 139 117 115 750 867
#002 Ivysaur Grass/Poison 60 62 63 60 80 325 385 15.6% 230 129 131 125 165 780 905
#139 Omastar Rock/Water 70 60 125 55 115 425 480 22.5% 250 125 255 115 235 980 1095
#137 Porygon Normal 65 60 70 40 75 310 350 14.6% 240 125 145 85 155 750 835
#017 Pidgeotto Normal/Flying 63 60 55 71 50 299 370 9.8% 236 125 115 147 105 728 875
#082 Magneton Steel/Electric 50 60 95 70 120 395 465 23.4% 210 125 195 145 245 920 1065
#021 Spearow Normal/Flying 40 60 30 70 31 231 301 6.1% 190 125 65 145 67 592 737
#023 Ekans Poison 35 60 44 55 40 234 289 7.8% 180 125 93 115 85 598 713
#032 Nidoran Poison 46 57 40 50 40 233 283 7.8% 202 119 85 105 85 596 701
#019 Rattata Normal 30 56 35 72 25 218 290 4.9% 170 117 75 149 55 566 715
#108 Lickitung Normal 90 55 75 30 60 310 340 11.7% 290 115 155 65 125 750 815
#114 Tangela Grass 65 55 115 60 100 395 455 19.5% 240 115 235 125 205 920 1045
#048 Venonat Bug/Poison 60 55 50 45 40 250 295 7.8% 230 115 105 95 85 630 725
#133 Eevee Normal 55 55 50 55 65 280 335 12.7% 220 115 105 115 135 690 805
#025 Pikachu Electric 35 55 30 90 50 260 350 9.8% 180 115 65 185 105 650 835
#050 Diglett Ground 10 55 25 95 45 230 325 8.8% 130 115 55 195 95 590 785
#054 Psyduck Water 50 52 48 55 50 255 310 9.8% 210 109 101 115