PlayStation 4 Hardware FAQ v1.1.1 - SunsThirdStone
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PlayStation 4 Hardware FAQ

by SunsThirdStone   Updated to v1.1.1 on
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Sony PlayStation 4 Hardware FAQ
Version 1.1.1 (3/8/2014)

By Nick Zitzmann
E-Mail: moc.liamg@namzkcin (spell that backwards for an E-Mail address)

For best results, please set your text editor/Web browser to use the ISO Latin
1 text encoding while reading this FAQ.


* LEGAL STUFF *
***************

Copyright 2014-2015 Nick Zitzmann.

This is a hardware FAQ for the Sony PlayStation 4. It does not cover PS4
software. If you need help with PS4 software, then you ought to visit a site
that carries software FAQs and walkthroughs, such as  or
.

The author and contributors are solely responsible for the content of this FAQ.
Sony Computer Entertainment was not involved in any way, shape, or form.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the
terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version
published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no
Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts.

To summarize the above paragraph, I don't particularly care if you want to
re-publish this FAQ elsewhere, or create your own derivative of this FAQ (e.g.
a localized version). However, I **do** care if you plagiarize this FAQ, or
re-publish it under a different license. Also, there are no warranties at all
on the information in this FAQ.

The entire license is available online at the following URL:


That said, the latest version of this FAQ published by the original author will
always be published first on GameFAQs:


If you're sufficiently bored, you can also read my PlayStation 3 hardware FAQ
on GameFAQs: 


* VERSION HISTORY *
*******************

1.0 (3/19/2014):
First release.

1.0.1 (4/10/2014):
Minor edits. Added two new questions & answers on keyboards & mice.

1.0.2 (5/14/2014):
Minor edits.

1.1 (11/22/2014):
Completely re-wrote 4.3 and added 2.4. Minor edits elsewhere.

1.1.1 (3/8/2015):
Added Share Play references, and corrections to 6.4 and 6.5.


* TABLE OF CONTENTS *
*********************

To skip ahead to a specific part of the FAQ, then use your browser/text
editor's find feature, usually activated by pressing Cmd-F on Mac OS X or
Ctrl-F on Windows or GNU/Linux.

* 1.0 - General PS4 info.
* 1.1 - What is the PlayStation 4?
* 1.2 - What are the differences between the PS3 and PS4?
* 1.3 - What kinds of PS4s have been released?
* 1.4 - Does the PS4 have a regional lockout?
* 1.5 - Does the PS4 have parental controls?
* 1.6 - What are the hardware specs of the PS4?
* 1.7 - What I/O ports come with the PS4?
* 1.8 - What comes bundled with the PS4?
* 1.9 - What is the PlayStation app?

* 2.0 - Video displays and the PS4
* 2.1 - What video cables are supported by the PS4?
* 2.2 - Can I use my PS1/PS2/PS3 video cable(s) with my PS4?
* 2.3 - Does it matter which HDMI cable I use?
* 2.4 - Can I connect my PS4 to a computer monitor?

* 3.0 - Audio speakers and the PS4
* 3.1 - What audio types are supported by the PS4?
* 3.2 - How do I get multi-channel sound output on the PS4?

* 4.0 - Backward compatibility
* 4.1 - Is the PS4 backward compatibile with the PS1/PS2/PS3?
* 4.2 - Why not?
* 4.3 - What about the PS3 to PS4 program?

* 5.0 - Going online with the PS4
* 5.1 - Do I need to go online in order to use my PS4?
* 5.2 - Ethernet or Wi-Fi? Which is better?
* 5.3 - Can i play PS4 games with pc/mac/x1 users?
* 5.4 - Do I need to pay to play games online with the PS4?
* 5.5 - Why isn't online play free anymore?
* 5.6 - Do I need a headset to play online games?
* 5.7 - Are online games segregated by platform/region?
* 5.8 - Are online passes required to play PS4 games online?
* 5.9 - What is a "NAT type" and how do I change it?
* 5.10 - Should I use Share Play? (IMPORTANT - SECURITY HOLE ALERT)

* 6.0 - Controllers on the PS4
* 6.1 - What is the Dual Shock 4?
* 6.2 - What is the PlayStation Move?
* 6.3 - Do any of the earlier Dual Shock controllers work with the PS4?
* 6.4 - Can I use the Dual Shock 4 as a computer game pad?
* 6.5 - Can I use a keyboard or mouse with my PS4?
* 6.6 - Why doesn't my numeric keypad work?

* 7.0 - Backing up & managing data on the PS4
* 7.1 - How do I back up my PS4 hard drive?
* 7.2 - What kind of device do I need to do a backup?
* 7.3 - Can I upgrade my PS4's hard drive?
* 7.4 - Why does the PS4 report that my blank hard disk has considerably less
        space available for it than the hard disk was advertised as having?


* 1.0 - GENERAL PS4 INFO. *
***************************


* 1.1 - WHAT IS THE PLAYSTATION 4? *
************************************

The PlayStation 4 is Sony's fourth PlayStation. It supersedes the PlayStation 1
(PS1, or "PSX" for a while until Sony released a different console with that
abbreviation), PlayStation 2 (PS2), and PlayStation 3 (PS3).


* 1.2 - WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE PS3 and PS4? *
***********************************************************

The PS4 has a newer, faster CPU and GPU. Almost every PS3 game that wasn't an
HD port of a PS2 game supported 1080p output externally, but ran at 720p
internally and upscan-converted the results. Just about every PS4 game runs at
1080p internally & externally with a full frame rate.

But it's not just the graphics that got better. They also added:
* A brand new UI called "Dynamic Menu" that replaces the Cross Media Bar
* Background music on the home screen
* Better multitasking support (you can, for example, adjust system settings or
  run the Web browser while a game is running)
* Multiple sign-ins on one console (the PS3 had support for multiple user
  profiles, but only one user could be signed in at a time; this was a feature
  the Xbox 360 had that the PS3 lacked)
* Party chat (another feature the Xbox 360 had that the PS3 lacked)
* Voice mail (yet another X360 feature the PS3 lacked)
* Greatly improved social gaming features (e.g. no more using e-mail to invite
  players into multi-player games)
* Better online sharing features, including streaming & session sharing
* The triumphant return of the slide-loading optical drive (which was present
  on original and slim-model PS3s, but removed from the super-slim models)
* Remote software download support (including downloading/installing patches
  while the system is in standby; this was a feature the Wii had that the PS3
  lacked)
* Game patches are now downloaded in the background after starting a game for
  the first time (many people disliked how the PS3 handled patches)
* Certain downloadable games can now be downloaded in parts (so you can start
  playing the game while waiting on additional content to be downloaded)
* Second screen support using either a PS Vita or mobile phone/tablet (in
  supported games; see 1.9 below)
* Remote play of PS4 games using a PS Vita (in all PS4 games except for those
  that require use of the PlayStation Camera or other accessories)
* Voice commands in the system menu and in supported games (like X360 with
  Kinect)
* Sign-in using facial recognition (also like X360 with Kinect; requires a
  PlayStation Camera)
* If online, you can now see how common a game's trophies are held among PSN
  users who have played the game at least once (this information was previously
  only available to developers)
* Faster USB, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth support
* Auto-toggle of daylight savings time (if you live in an area that observes
  daylight savings time/summer time/whatever your locale calls it)
* Controllers can be recharged while the console is in standby mode
* Limited 4K resolution support

Some features got changed:
* The background firmware update download feature, which was only available
  with a PlayStation Plus subscription on the PS3, is now free on the PS4
* Likewise, game patch background downloads, which was also a "premium" feature
  in the past, is now free when the console is turned on (it's still a premium
  feature in offline mode)
* The HDMI port will now auto-detect your A/V system's capabilities so you no
  longer have to manually set it up

Some PS3 features were dropped:
* The startup sound effect (the PS1, PS2, and PS3 each had a different one)
* PlayStation Home (which Sony will discontinue in 2015)
* Life with PlayStation (which Sony discontinued in 2012)
* Other OS (which Sony controversially removed from the PS3 in an update)
* UPnP streaming
* Analog audio/video out (see 2.1 below)
* PS1 backward compatibility (see 4.2 below)
* Memory card ports (which were present on early PS3 models, but later dropped)
* Full hard disk backup/restore
* Voice masking
* Bluetooth headset support
* PlayStation Portable (PSP) support
* All LEDs on the front of the console (the PS3 had separate LEDs for power,
  optical drive, Wi-Fi, and the hard drive)
* Adobe Flash support in the Web browser


* 1.3 - WHAT KINDS OF PS4s HAVE BEEN RELEASED? *
************************************************

As of early 2014, only one - a "500 GB" model. This answer will be updated as
Sony releases more models in the future.


* 1.4 - DOES THE PS4 HAVE A REGIONAL LOCKOUT? *
***********************************************

Thankfully not on games. The console will honor the regional lockout on DVDs
and Blu-ray discs, however, because Sony is contractually obligated to do so.


* 1.5 - DOES THE PS4 HAVE PARENTAL CONTROLS? *
**********************************************

Yes, and they work for games, DVDs, Blu-ray discs, and even the Web browser.

Don't lose your passcode! Like the PS3 before it, the PS4 has no back-door for
the parental controls (the PS2 had one), so it's self-defeating to forget the
passcode once one is set.


* 1.6 - WHAT ARE THE HARDWARE SPECS OF THE PS4? *
*************************************************

CPU/GPU:   AMD custom system-on-a-chip, 8 cores, 64-bit w/secondary low-power
           CPU for background tasks
RAM:       8 GB (unified video/general use)
Wi-Fi:     802.11 b/g/n
Optical:   CD, DVD, Blu-ray disc


* 1.7 - WHAT I/O PORTS COME WITH THE PS4? *
*******************************************

Peripheral support is handled through two USB 3.0 ports, as well as a Bluetooth
2.1 radio. There is also a 10/100/1000-Base-T Ethernet port for networking, an
HDMI port for audio/video, and an S/PDIF port for audio.

The PS4, like the PS3 before it, has a bay for a serial ATA laptop-sized hard
drive, allowing users to plug in a separate hard drive.

All ports on the PS4 are hot-pluggable, that is, you can plug and unplug things
in these ports while the console is running. But since you should never remove
a computer's boot drive while the computer is running, you should treat the
hard drive as if it's not hot-pluggable.


* 1.8 - WHAT COMES BUNDLED WITH THE PS4? *
******************************************

The PS4 comes with:
* The console itself (obviously)
* 1 controller (Dual Shock 4)
* 1 mono headset w/microphone for the controller
* 1 HDMI cable
* 1 USB regular size to mini size cable (for the controller)
* 1 AC adapter cable
* At least one "getting started" guide, perhaps several if your locale has
  multiple official languages
* 1 bundle-in game, "The Playroom"

Some PS4 bundles may include additional bundle-in games.

The PlayStation Camera and Move controllers are sold separately as of early
2014.


* 1.9 - WHAT IS THE PLAYSTATION APP? *
**************************************

The PS3 had a few games that allowed users to play them using a PS Vita, as
well as one game, "Beyond: Two Souls," that allowed users to have a second
screen experience with a mobile phone/tablet application. The PlayStation App
just brings this concept to the PS4, so that games can provide second-screen
functionality using either a phone or tablet or PS Vita. Think of it as an
evolution of the Sega Dreamcast's VMU and the Nintendo Wii U's tablet.

The app also allows users to view their PSN trophies and buy/download things
from the PlayStation Network.

It is a free download from your device's app store:
iOS: 
Android: 


* 2.0 - VIDEO DISPLAYS AND THE PS4 *
************************************

* 2.1 - WHAT VIDEO CABLES ARE SUPPORTED BY THE PS4? *
*****************************************************

Only one: HDMI. The analog A/V multi-out port that was on the PS1 (starting
with the 5xxx models), PS2, and PS3 is no longer present on the PS4.

You can still convert the HDMI signal into DVI-D or DisplayPort with an adapter
if you want to use your PS4 with a computer monitor that supports one of those
two standards. But if you have a legacy analog TV, or a first-generation HDTV
with only component video input, then you will need to upgrade your TV before
you can use it with a PS4.


* 2.2 - CAN I USE MY PS1/PS2/PS3 VIDEO CABLE(S) WITH MY PS4? *
**************************************************************

Your PS3 HDMI cable will continue to work, but due to the PS4's lack of an A/V
multi-out port, your legacy analog cables will not work with the PS4.


* 2.3 - DOES IT MATTER WHICH HDMI CABLE I USE? *
***********************************************

Sort of. If you are feeding audio through the cable, then the HDMI cable has to
be HDMI 1.3-compliant or you won't get audio. Every HDMI cable on sale today is
compliant, and has been for years now, including the cable that comes with the
console, so you generally don't need to worry about that.

Since HDMI carries a digital signal rather than an analog signal, using a more
expensive cable will _not_ give you a better picture.


* 2.4 - CAN I CONNECT MY PS4 TO A COMPUTER MONITOR? *
*****************************************************

Yes, but please note:

1. Many computer monitors have a native aspect ratio of 16:10, which is
   different from TV sets, where the native aspect ratio is 16:9. If your
   computer monitor is 16:10, then the picture will be vertically stretched
   unless you set the monitor to display the picture to its aspect ratio, in
   which case, there will be black bars at the top & bottom of the picture.
   If both stretching and black bars bother you, then you ought to use either
   a TV set, or a monitor with a native 16:9 ratio.

2. The PS4 only has an HDMI output port. If your monitor supports HDMI, which
   most monitors made since around 2010 do support, then you're all set. If
   your monitor supports Thunderbolt/DisplayPort instead of HDMI, then you will
   need an adapter. If your monitor only supports a legacy HD input method,
   such as DVI or VGA, then you will need an adapter, as well as a separate
   stereo system that supports either HDMI or S/PDIF, or you won't get any
   sound. If your monitor only supports SDTV signals, or requires Component or
   SCART or D-Terminal video, then it's time to upgrade your monitor.


* 3.0 - AUDIO SPEAKERS AND THE PS4 *
************************************

* 3.1 - WHAT AUDIO TYPES ARE SUPPORTED BY THE PS4? *
****************************************************

All common digital formats. The PS4 supports Linear Pulse Code Modulation
(PCM), Dolby Digital 5.1 (AC3), Digital Theater System (DTS), and their
uncompressed equivalents (Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD) as well.

The PS4 supports audio out over either HDMI or S/PDIF, however, S/PDIF users
are limited to 2-channel PCM, AC3, and DTS only. If you are using an old analog
stereo system with RCA/composite audio input, then you will need to upgrade it
in order to use it with the PS4.


* 3.2 - HOW DO I GET MULTI-CHANNEL SOUND OUTPUT ON THE PS4? *
*************************************************************

Sony changed this between the PS3 and PS4. On the PS3, you could manually
toggle multi-channel out in the audio settings. The PS4 still does this for
S/PDIF, but if you're using HDMI for audio, then the PS4 will auto-detect what
your sound system supports and adjust its output accordingly (though the most
recent firmware makes an exception and allows 5.1 channel mode to be manually
enabled if the stereo supports 7.1 channel audio). The problem is, if you have
the PS4 connected to a stereo, and the stereo has audio pass-through turned on,
then it will only output 2-channel audio over HDMI unless you turn off audio
pass-through on your stereo.

On most stereos, you do this by setting HDMI audio out from amplifier+TV to
just amplifier. If there is a separate pass-through setting, make sure it is
turned off.

Also, if you're watching a movie and you're only getting 2-channel output, try
pausing and pulling up the movie's audio options. Most movies come with both
2-channel and multi-channel audio options, and default to 2-channel.


* 4.0 - BACKWARD COMPATIBILITY *
********************************

* 4.1 - IS THE PS4 BACKWARD COMPATIBILE WITH THE PS1/PS2/PS3? *
***************************************************************

As in running legacy PS1/PS2/PS3 games? No, it is not.


* 4.2 - WHY NOT? *
******************

The short answer: Because Sony changed the PlayStation CPU architecture for the
third time since 1995.

The long answer:

The PS1 used a custom Sony-made CPU and a custom Sony-made GPU. The CPU used
the MIPS instruction set, which was then made by MIPS Technologies (now
Imagination Technologies).

The PS2 also used a custom Sony-made CPU that used MIPS (which Sony called
"Emotion Engine") and a custom Sony/Toshiba-made GPU ("Graphics Synthesizer").
It had everything on board it needed to run PS1 software using just the console
hardware.

The PS3 did not use a MIPS-compatible CPU; it used a custom PowerPC CPU (which
Sony called "Cell Broadband Engine"), and the PowerPC and MIPS instruction sets
are not even remotely compatible with one another. To achieve PS1 backward
compatibility, the PS3 ran PS1 games in a virtual machine, emulating the CPU
and GPU in software. It worked quite well. To achieve PS2 backward
compatibility, the two launch PS3s had the PS2 hardware on board, while the 80
GB and European 60 GB models had the PS2's GPU & vector units on board and
emulated the CPU in software. But having PS2 hardware inside the PS3 greatly
increased the cost of producing each console at a time when Sony was under
pressure to lower the PS3's price, so the feature was taken out after a while.

The PS4 uses a CPU and GPU from AMD, which uses the X86 and X86-64 instruction
sets, and is not compatible with the PS3's PowerPC CPU or RSX GPU. And while it
is a powerful CPU and GPU, it isn't remotely powerful enough to run PS3
software in a virtual machine and allow that software to actually be playable.

Sony changed the PS4's CPU architecture because IBM and Freescale, the two
companies that make PowerPC CPUs, both dropped out of the super-speed race with
Intel and AMD, and decided to focus on embedded systems that don't need extreme
performance. This happened around the same time that Apple switched their
computer CPUs from PowerPC to X86, which happened just before the PS3 launched.
So they had to make the switch in order to stay competitive with Microsoft,
which made the same CPU architecture switch between the Xbox 360 and Xbox One.

The PS4 could theoretically play PS1 games in a virtual machine, but so far,
Sony has not ported their PS1 virtual machine to the PS4. I'm guessing that
porting it is not as simple as just re-compiling the source code. And because
of PlayStation Now, I do not expect them to port it over. We'll see.


* 4.3 - WHAT ABOUT THE PS3 TO PS4 PROGRAM? *
********************************************

At launch, Sony had a program where select games purchased for PS3 could be
updated to PS4 versions for a per-game fee. This program never caught on with
publishers after launch, and so only a few post-launch games had upgrade paths
available:

1. All cross-buy games with PS4 ports purchased on a PS3 can be downloaded for
   free on a PS4. This includes "Doki Doki Universe," "Flower," and others.
2. "Final Fantasy XIV" has a free PS3-to-PS4 upgrade path, but you must have a
   PS3 service entitlement on your Square Enix account (which involves logging
   into the game on a PS3 using a freshly purchased copy of the game), and
   participating means losing your PS3 license permanently. In other words, you
   cannot buy the PS3 version and upgrade for free if you don't have a PS3,
   and once you upgrade, there's no going back. This deal expires on March 31,
   2015.
3. "Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare" is not a cross-buy game, but Activision
   does offer a free upgrade path.


* 5.0 - GOING ONLINE WITH THE PS4 *
***********************************

* 5.1 - DO I NEED TO GO ONLINE IN ORDER TO USE MY PS4? *
********************************************************

No; at no point does the PS4 require a network connection in order to work. You
might want to take it online, however, to download things, play online, stream
your gameplay, stream movies/TV, or sync your trophies or game data.


* 5.2 - ETHERNET OR WI-FI? WHICH IS BETTER? *
*********************************************

Well, Wi-Fi will certainly be cheaper, and allow you to place your PS4 far away
from your router without having to run a long & potentially expensive cable.
But if your PS4 is located close to the router, I would recommend running a
Cat-6 Ethernet cable instead. With an Ethernet connection, you will get lower
connection latency, less susceptibility to wireless interference, and faster
transfer speeds over the LAN (1 Gb/s vs. ~40 Mb/s on 802.11g radios vs. ~600
Mb/s on 802.11n radios).

I placed a tilde in front of those numbers because you will never hit & sustain
peak transmission rates over Wi-Fi, especially if some other device(s) are
using the radio at once.


* 5.3 - CAN I PLAY PS4 GAMES WITH PC/MAC/X1 USERS? *
****************************************************

With Xbox One users, no. With computer users, it depends. Unlike Microsoft and
their Xbox Live service, Sony is cool with third-party developers using the
PlayStation Network as a gateway to third-party online services. And games that
use a third-party service instead of running on-network can be played with
PC/Mac users. The PS3 version of "Portal 2," for example, connected to the
Steam network, and thus allowed OS X and Windows and PS3 users to play
together.


* 5.4 - DO I NEED TO PAY TO PLAY GAMES ONLINE WITH THE PS4? *
*************************************************************

Yes and no. Games that are free to play, as well as games that require a
separate subscription fee in order to play (such as "Final Fantasy XIV"), can
be played by all PlayStation Network account holders. All other games require a
PlayStation Plus subscription in order to play online. Yes, this has changed
since the PS3.


* 5.5 - WHY ISN'T ONLINE PLAY FREE ANYMORE? *
*********************************************

You have to remember that, with free products/services, one or both of the
following things are true:

1. You are not the customer; you are the product. The customers, typically
   advertisers, are paying to get access to you.
2. The product/service is being subsidized by the revenue from some other
   source, or by charitable giving if the provider is a non-profit
   organization.

The PSN is not free for Sony to operate. During the PS3 era, the PSN was mostly
financed by #2, with a little bit of #1 in the form of PlayStation Home
sponsorships. Sony made the promise of free online play with the PS3, and they
kept their promise. But since the PS3 launched, the Sony products whose sales
subsidized the PSN have been on a downward tried, so the money necessary to run
the PSN shifted to subscriptions.


* 5.6 - DO I NEED A HEADSET TO PLAY ONLINE GAMES? *
***************************************************

No. However, you should use one in games that support voice chat, so you can
communicate with other players as you play the game. You can use either a Dual
Shock 4 plug-in headset or the PlayStation Camera as a speakerphone. Bluetooth
headsets don't work as of this writing (March 2014), but they ought to work in
a future update.


* 5.7 - ARE ONLINE GAMES SEGREGATED BY PLATFORM/REGION? *
*********************************************************

No, unless the law of the land says otherwise, because segregation is a really
bad idea with online games. Most people want to play with their friends, and
segregation gets in the way of that.


* 5.8 - ARE ONLINE PASSES REQUIRED TO PLAY PS4 GAMES ONLINE? *
**************************************************************

No. "Online passes" were used game "taxes" that were imposed on PS3 owners that
either borrowed or bought a game used and then tried to play the game online.
Sony claims to have discontinued this practice on the PS4.


* 5.9 - WHAT IS A "NAT TYPE" AND HOW DO I CHANGE IT? *
******************************************************

NAT stands for "Network Address Translation," and it is a system that allows
multiple devices on a private LAN to share a single IP address when connected
to the Internet. It is effectively the glue that holds the IPv4 Internet
together, since there are far more devices connected to the Internet than there
are public IP addresses available for them.

When you perform a connection test on the PS4, it will report one of the three
NAT types:

Type 1 means your PS4 is not behind a NAT, and is fully on the public Internet.

Type 2 means your PS4 is behind a NAT, and the NAT is correctly forwarding
incoming connections on the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User
Datagram Protocol (UDP) ports the PS4 uses from the router to the console.

Type 3 means your PS4 is behind a NAT, and cannot receive incoming connections
on those TCP or UDP ports.

On pretty much every modern home network router, your NAT type ought to be type
1 or 2. Type 1 is not optimal, though, because any script kiddie commanding an
army of zombie PCs can flood your PS4 with traffic and knock it off the
Internet. Type 3 is even worse, because you will experience connection problems
playing online games if it's cut off from reception. Type 2 is the best,
followed by type 1, then type 3.

You cannot change the NAT type on the PS4; you can only change the type by
changing your network configuration. You can move it from type 3 to type 1 by
instructing your router to put your PS4's IP address in the "demilitarized
zone" (DMZ), but that is not a good idea for the security reasons I mentioned
above. Here are some better ideas:

1. Upgrade your router if you can afford it. Your PS4 should not report as
   being under a type 3 NAT on any home network router made in the last few
   years, since pretty much all of them can perform intelligent port
   forwarding.

2. If you can't do that, then you need to set up port forwarding manually. You
   will need administrator access to your router to do this. Most routers have
   a Web browser-based interface for configuration; check its documentation for
   details if you haven't done this before.

3. If you have NATs behind NATs, stop that. That's silly unless you are in the
   rather unusual situation of having to share a single network connection with
   tens of thousands of other devices. Consider consolidating down to a single
   all-in-one router, or at least make the master router handle DHCP and
   disable the other NATs.

The incoming ports you will need to forward to the PS4's IP address are: TCP
80, 443, 5223, 9293; TCP/UDP 10070-10080; UDP 3478, 3479, 3658, and 6000-7000.


* 5.10 - SHOULD I USE SHARE PLAY? (IMPORTANT - SECURITY HOLE ALERT) *
*********************************************************************

It depends on the game.

First of all, if you do not subscribe to PlayStation Plus, you cannot use Share
Play to share your session or play a multi-player game.

Second, you **really** need to be careful about sharing your session. I
strongly recommend that, if you are playing a game where your character is
stored server-side, and the game includes avatars with items and equipment,
that you never allow Share Play. The reason is because, in that scenario, Share
Play is a security hole that can lead to the destruction of all of your
progress in a game in the hands of someone you don't know. (And yes, this has
happened to people.)

If your game is stored client-side, then it's probably okay to share your
session, but I would recommend you keep your game backed up before you do that.
Usually, online games store progress server-side to prevent cheating, while
offline games store progress client-side.

So Share Play is a fine feature for action and sports games, but you shouldn't
use it in games with RPG elements.


* 6.0 - CONTROLLERS ON THE PS4 *
********************************

* 6.1 - WHAT IS THE DUAL SHOCK 4? *
***********************************

The Dual Shock 4 is Sony's fourth-generation controller (fifth if you count the
PS1's analog-less launch controllers).

It is functionally the same as the Dual Shock 3, but it has a few changes:
* There is a new trackpad located between the joysticks
* Like the Wii remote, there is now a speaker on the controller
* There is now a port on the console for a headset
* There is also an "EXT" port present for apparent future use
* The "Select" and "Start" buttons have been renamed to "Share" and "Options"
* Both joysticks and the L2/R2 triggers were redesigned to be easier to grip
* And then there's the controller's most notable love/hate feature, the
  light-bar in the front of the controller, which replaces the red LED on the
  Dual Shock 3

There was one Dual Shock 3 feature that didn't make it into the Dual Shock 4:
* Pressure-sensitive controller buttons other than L2 and R2 (which were only
  used in a few PS2/PS3 games, most notably "Metal Gear Sold HD Collection")


* 6.2 - WHAT IS THE PLAYSTATION MOVE? *
***************************************

The PlayStation Move is Sony's 3D motion controller. It is only supported in
specially marked PS4 games, and requires the PlayStation Camera in order to
work.

Although the Move was originally intended to work with the PS3, Move
controllers work with the PS4 as well.


* 6.3 - DO ANY OF THE EARLIER DUAL SHOCK CONTROLLERS WORK WITH THE PS4? *
*************************************************************************

No, they do not. You need new controllers for the PS4.


* 6.4 - CAN I USE THE DUAL SHOCK 4 AS A COMPUTER GAME PAD? *
************************************************************

Yes, and here's the great news: Unlike the previous Dual Shock controllers, you
don't need an adapter or a driver in order to get it to work. The Dual Shock 4
fully supports the USB and Bluetooth HID interfaces, so you just need to plug
it into your computer, and it will work, careless of whether you are using OS X
or Windows or GNU/Linux on your computer.

To use the controller as a Bluetooth wireless controller, while the controller
is turned off and unplugged, press and hold the Share and PS buttons until the
controller's light starts to flicker. You can then pair with the controller
from any Bluetooth-enabled computer with a controller profile. To re-pair it
with your PS4, plug it into the PS4, then press the PS button.

Windows users: On Windows, there are a lot of games that recognize the Xbox 360
controller and load a pre-set configuration when they detect the controller. 
However, very few (if any) games do this for the PS4 controller. To make these
games think your PS4 controller is an Xbox 360 controller, consider installing
the third-party app "DS4Windows": 


* 6.5 - CAN I USE A KEYBOARD OR MOUSE WITH MY PS4? *
****************************************************

Just like you could on the PS3, you can use both a keyboard and mouse on a PS4.
They have to support either Bluetooth, USB, or non-Bluetooth wireless with a
USB receiver. In other words, your legacy IBM PS/2 keyboard won't work with the
PS4 without a USB adapter.

You can set the keyboard type in Settings -> Devices -> External Keyboard.

If you choose a non-Roman keyboard layout (Japanese, Korean, etc.), then you
can switch alphabets by pressing Alt-~ on your keyboard while typing. Keep in
mind that non-Roman keyboard layouts are typically based upon the ISO layout,
which is common in Europe and Asia, but not common in the Americas, which use
the ANSI layout instead, so there will be some differences in punctuation keys.

The keyboard can be used in any app or game that supports text input, as well
as the home screen. The keyboard will not work as a controller in a game,
except in games specifically programmed to work with the keyboard, such as
"Final Fantasy XIV" and "War Thunder."

The mouse can only be used in games that specifically support the mouse as an
input device. There are third-party devices out there that will allow you to
use a mouse (and keyboard) as a controller, by emulating a gamepad. I haven't
used any such devices, so your mileage may vary.

Only one logged-in user at a time will get to use each device.


* 6.6 - WHY DOESN'T MY NUMERIC KEYPAD WORK? *
*********************************************

The PS4 by default puts the keyboard into "num lock" mode, which won't be
obvious on keyboards that don't have any indicator for this state, such as
Apple's keyboards. In this mode, pressing a key on the numeric keypad will
correspond to a directional key instead of a number. To get the numeric keypad
to work, try pressing the key in the upper-left corner that is not a function
key.


* 7.0 - BACKING UP & MANAGING DATA ON THE PS4 *
***********************************************

* 7.1 - HOW DO I BACK UP MY PS4 HARD DRIVE? *
*********************************************

Unfortunately, the full disk backup feature that was present on the PS3 is not
present on the PS4. I'm not sure why it was removed, but there is a workaround:

1. Plug in an external USB drive
2. Go to Settings -> System Storage Management -> Application Save Data ->
   Saved Data in System Storage -> Copy to USB Storage Device
3. You can now choose saved data to back up to the device

Alternately, if you are a PlayStation Plus subscriber, you can choose "Upload
to Online Storage" instead to back up your PS4 save data to Sony's servers.

This means you can make backup copies of your PS4 saved game data, and nothing
else. So far as I know, it is not possible to backup your installed games or
other media, so if your hard drive crashes or needs replacement, you'll have to
download them again. And just as it was on the PS3, in order to make a backup
of your trophies, you will need to sign into the PSN and synchronize your
trophies with the service.


* 7.2 - WHAT KIND OF DEVICE DO I NEED TO DO A BACKUP? *
*******************************************************

Any USB device that (1) supports the mass-storage standard and (2) has a FAT
partition on it can be used as a backup disk. I would recommend just using a
USB thumb drive or an SD card reader.


* 7.3 - CAN I UPGRADE MY PS4's HARD DRIVE? *
********************************************

Yes. Just like on the PS3, you can use any serial ATA drive made for laptops in
your PS4.


* 7.4 - WHY DOES THE PS4 REPORT THAT MY BLANK HARD DISK HAS CONSIDERABLY *
*       LESS SPACE AVAILABLE FOR IT THAN THE HARD DISK WAS ADVERTISED    *
*       AS HAVING?                                                       *
**************************************************************************

Because computer marketers intentionally overstate the capacity of hard drives.
One true gigabyte is 1,073,741,824 bytes, but hard disk sizes are marked as if
a gigabyte was 1,000,000,000 bytes, which is not true. That's why your "500 GB"
PS4 hard disk actually has considerably less space available.

Pretty much everyone in the computer industry, not just Sony, markets computers
and hard disks this way. And before you ask, yes, they do point this out in the
fine print in order to avoid lawsuits.


* SPECIAL THANKS *
******************

Thanks to:

* CJayC and SBAllen (for hosting this FAQ)
* Raven on PSN for the port numbers enumerated in 5.9:


Fin!
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