Neoseeker : News : Deciphering the BioShock Infinite: Burial at Sea - Episode Two ending, why it's perfect for BioShock
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Xeros the Slayer Apr 1, 14
I wouldn't call it perfectly ending it. Elizabeth is an omniscient time god and with her untapped powers could have stopped the entire thing from happening, but instead we're put through a ton of contrivances just because they want another way for the games to loop back in on themselves.

Elizabeth felt bad over the death of one person and using another person so she "fixes" it by... allowing the deaths of many more people. What?
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Andrew LB Apr 2, 14
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You missed the whole point Xeros. She is a human who had been given incredible powers and she did exactly what one would expect being a flawed human like we all are.
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Xeros the Slayer Apr 2, 14
I thought that up in about a minute and I don't have the power to see every decision I could possibly make play out however I want it to. So... yeah. She could have stopped it before it began but the devs just wanted more plot hooks that didn't really need to be there.

When you have a character whose driving force is guilt in their involvement with the death of one person and giving another person a happier life down the line and they have the ability to simply make that death and suffering not happen... how is the destruction of an entire city plus a plane full of people the better choice?

Elizabeth, because of the nature of her power, can't not know this stuff. She knows the horror she's invited upon the world by allowing Fontaine to have his way, she knows the suffering Jack will go through, she knows all of the death and destruction the fall of Rapture will incur. But screw all that, one little girl will get to be happy at some point probably. Except for the part where, you know, she could have been happy and with her not dead family or not dead alt-Booker in a not destroyed city days, weeks, or maybe even months ago because Elizabeth is for all intents and purposes a Time Lord.
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Kat Apr 4, 14
It was never about the girl. She thought it was when she lost her ability to see everything, but it wasn't in the end. It was about setting these events into motion so that it could end as it was supposed to. She had to return to rapture so that she could play her part in finishing the cycle. Like Andrew said, you're kinda missing the point. How fun of a game would it be to play if she stopped everything from happening to begin with? Not fun at all.
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Xeros the Slayer Apr 4, 14
Except it is about the girl and to some degree redemption from the perspective of Elizabeth, the protagonist, the person you play as for this half of the DLC.

But if that is the point of this entire project, I'm complaining about the point of the game because it's a contrived and frankly pretty dumb one and they completely swept aside their character motivations to do it. They threw out everything they establish of this plot in the final act for low-grade fanservice that had no point in existing in the first place.

"Revelations from Episode Two

In 1958, Elizabeth arrives in Rapture through a Tear. A witness reports this to the authorities, and Yi Suchong begins researching the phenomenon. Incidentally, this is the same year Jack is smuggled to the surface.

Thanks to the Tears, Suchong comes in contact with Jeremiah Fink, and the two exchange ideas, resulting in the similarities between Rapture and Columbia. Fink inspires the "Protector Program" for Big Daddies with Songbird, while Suchong's Plasmids lead Fink to inventing Vigors.

Holy crap, Daisy wasn't totally crazy! Indeed, Daisy Fitzroy, leader of the Vox Populi, was previously murdered in BioShock Infinite by Elizabeth in order to prevent her from murdering Fink's son. Turns out, the Luteces were helping Daisy with her revolution, and they're the ones who convince her to hold the boy hostage in order to provoke Elizabeth. Never intending to harm the boy, Daisy goes along anyway, convinced this will ultimately bring down Comstock.
Elizabeth inadvertently causes Suchong's death by rescuing the Big Daddy responsible just moments before, when she helps it bond with two Little Sister, one of whom Suchong physically strikes out of annoyance. Shouldn't have done that!

Atlas, actually Frank Fontaine, is searching for a weapon called "Ace in the Hole." When Elizabeth is sent to retrieve it from Suchong's lab, she finds a piece of paper with the phrase "Would you kindly." Atlas' ace in the hole is the trigger phrase for controlling Jack, which he uses to bring Jack back to Rapture as part of his plans to overthrow founder Andrew Ryan.

Sally, the Little Sister seen in Burial at Sea and rescued by Elizabeth, is actually one of the girls seen at the end of BioShock. In the canon (good) ending, Jack brings with him five Little Sisters to the surface, where they are raised normally as his daughters."

This? All this? This kind of shit retroactively degrades the first entry in Bioshock by forcibly tying it into this mess of an entry. Ken Levine you plot rapist, forcing your shitty new ideas into pretty good old ones without consent.

This is a developer who, for many people, have their narrative as a point of pride when the entire Infinite project is incredibly weak in story and the only thing that keeps it interesting in any regard was the interplay of Booker and Elizabeth but even that falls apart.

And I'm not saying don't make it, or make it something unplayable. I'm saying make the journey of undoing the mistakes of the past rather than take a trip down fanservice lane and force Bioshock to suddenly be the result of the actions of this DLC. You have a character whose power is time travel and the ability to peer into the multiverse, that means this could be one of many instances of Rapture and things turn out differently. Much like how in Infinite there wasn't just one version of Columbia. But no, we're going to make Elizabeth the actual instigator of the first games plot because reasons.
Last edited by Xeros the Slayer :: Apr 4, 14
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adibo Apr 10, 14
However, in addition to being beautiful, stable and have an intuitive and well thought out gameplay, it ends masterly the Infinite opus. Thee background is very complete like the rest of the series also; the atmosphere is really involved, the palpable tension; it is strong and intense!
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Dan May 2, 14
Thanks for the write up. Finally finished ep. 2 and this really helped me get my head around everything that happened.
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bluetom May 2, 14
I totally agree with Xeros.
as much as i loved the first two Bioshock games with their clever and unexpected plot twists, i hated the endings of the infinite series.
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María May 4, 14
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Mr Brown May 26, 14
My only problem with the established ending of Burial at Sea Episode 2 is Jack's involvement in Elizabeth's grand master plan. Elizabeth went through a gruesome death at the hands of Atlas just to bring about the fall of both Andrew Ryan and Atlas. No where in her plan does it guarantee that the Little Sisters and Sally are guaranteed survival when Jack arrives. I say this because Elizabeth's perfectly crafted plan is flawed because she can't account for Jack's actions in the whole thing. In Bioshock 1, Jack could choose whether or not to save or harvest the Little Sisters. My question is this, why would she go through all this suffering and sacrifice for what amounts to a chance that the Little Sisters and Sally will be saved? Is it possible that she somehow affected Jack in some way before he gets to Rapture in order to guarantee the girl's survival? If so then what is it because honestly I don't see how any of this works. I know Elizabeth crafted the greatest plan I have ever seen, yet it falls apart if she couldn't account for Jack's interactions with the Little Sisters. Because otherwise all Elizabeth succeeded in doing was guaranteeing that Jack will kill Atlas and Andrew Ryan but left everything else up to chance. I like to think that she wouldn't have made such a gamble without covering all her bases. I like to think that she was trying to guarantee that not just in one universe will Sally and the Little Sisters be saved but in all of them. Similar to how she wanted to break the cycle in Infinite by drowning Comstock, I thought she would have wanted to do the same thing with Sally and the Little Sisters. Make a variable, the Little Sister's survival, into a constant across all universes. Please someone, anyone help me understand this. I would really like people's input on this. Thank you for reading my very long comment.
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daas88 May 30, 14
Mr Brown, I think you're missing something. Elizabeth doesn't have a master plan, remember she lost the ability to know the other realities and only deep in her subconscious she knows what will happen.
At the end she doesn't know exactly who Jack is and she doesn't has any doubts about him succeeding or not, because she just sees a glance of the future, what WILL happen, and knows this blonde dude would overcome all and kill both Ryan and Atlas, also curing Sally and the other little sisters. Her subconscious only let her know that in her last moments, so she sees Sally with some relief and dies.
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