Neoseeker : News : Hackers reportedly gets their hands on Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon and other games, circumvent DRM
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Blue Neon Apr 9, 13
Yup this thing is all over ThePirateBay already, about 6 or 7 different "cracker" groups have it on already.
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Fortitudo Apr 10, 13
Why? Wouldent it be incomplete?

There was a 30 minute gameplay video leaked but its gone. It has to be somewhere still.
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Blue Neon Apr 10, 13
Not sure if it is complete or not, I don't wanna download it since I gave up torrenting games years ago and despite me loving Far Cry 3 this just does not appeal to me at all.
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S-I-E Apr 10, 13
quote CTTR champion
Why? Wouldent it be incomplete?
it's probably still being tested and worked on but who really knows?
what bugs me sometimes is that for whatever reason this has been pirated the content always falls in the greasy hands of the wrong people.

wouldn't be surprised if in a few years computers would come with remote controlled self destruct capabilities as a piracy preventive. technically every computer can already do it except it would burn down if it did.
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Huntereb Apr 10, 13
Looking at the videos now, how were people actually able to grab this stuff?
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nipsen Apr 10, 13
quote Huntereb
Looking at the videos now, how were people actually able to grab this stuff?
Spoofing "vip" identities that can access content further in than normal customers. Similar to the PSN "hack", where the entire database was wide open if you belonged to certain domains from the point of view of the server.

It's set up that way to let testers and devs and so on have easy access to the software.

Incidentally, most drm in existence generally is designed to halt the spread of leaks from said testers and devs. When I was still "active" on "the scene", approximately 9/10 of the major releases would come, ultimately, from these sources. Releases that originated from hacks of servers, and so on, were and still are extremely rare (and generally shunned by the communities, mind you, for a range of different reasons).
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Huntereb Apr 10, 13
Thanks for the details nipsen. You would think that after Sony's big mess up they would have been a bit more protective of their stuff. Do you know if the game has any actual story scenes in it explaining how he got where he is? I would hope he's just in a trance or something, the videos I saw showed him with robot arms and stuff.
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harbin Apr 10, 13
Surely game companies must realise that DRM doesn't work. DRM no matter how secure they try and make it will always be circumventable.
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nipsen Apr 10, 13
That's.. not the problem, harbin. It's extremely easy to make pirating a game with a no-cd crack infinitely less convenient than buying it in a store, or buying it online, etc. It's not done, with honorable exceptions such as gog.com, but it's very easy to do it.

But the questions game-companies tend to ask in this situation are:
1. How can we control the release dates, and coordinate the releases with local advertisement, physical media releases, advertisement pushes, etc.
-this is taken care of with region-codes, initial activation., etc. So why do we have stuff like this now, that most publishers really don't have region-based releases any more..? It's because licenses and approval processes are region based. Going outside this process doesn't truly cause an infinite amount of issues nowadays, but it means that stores need separate lists when they import or buy to the stores, rather than simply pick from a pre-selected list the chain created for you, etc. Even some digital only games obey this convention, because they're distributed by companies that still are committed to the region model. Pre-order bonuses by region is for example something that retail chains actually pay for, believing it increases the value of their product over the competition. So insisting that regions or timed releases should cease to exist in that context is the same as saying no to money.

2. How can we make a buyer come back to us later, after they've successfully bought one of our products? How do we exploit the fact that the customer are willing to spend money on us for a longer time than just for the initial release?
-this is the portal software. Origin, Uplay, etc. This makes you sign up your e-mail, or create an account - that you then will, they hope, connect your credit card to. This is why xbox live was infinitely more appealing to advertisers compared to the psn, for example. Or why CCP is worth a trillion ISK - because it required you to have a credit card to get online to unlock stuff. Circumventing this by allowing people to never create an account, or simply have an account that only saves very select info, like your favourite servers, or your friends' nicks, that sort of thing, is completely useless for that purpose.

The argument that you would be able to increase the value of the initial purchase, and encourage new buyers, as well as new people to sign up - by incrementally offering more and more free content for as long as the game is popular -- is similarly thrown out, because it is completely counter-intuitive in the context these companies operate.

3. How do we prevent people(including our own guys) from pirating/copying our product?
-This is where disc protection schemes come in. And it is also, ironically, why companies are slowly starting to move over to digital only. Because digital only means it is very easy to tie a specific sale to a specific person and account. And this can make you get away with if not always online schemes, it will enable you to log each purchase, log purchasing habits, and easily lock people who don't have the login from easily playing the content. It also means that even if the product "leaks", "legitimate buyers" tied to portal systems/logins like Origin will still believe that pirating the game won't work (even if, as^ suggests, this opens up a slew of new potential "problems", due to the usual laziness and incompetence).

The activation keys for new releases that are bound to come with the next gen consoles is put in for this reason, and for the two other reasons further up: to stop people from easily copying the games, to log as much information as possible, and also to tie people's purchasing information to the portal software/account system.

So as you can see preventing piracy, or people copying the game to share it with their friends, this is really just a small, small part of the concern. And it's not where the actual effort is put in at all. Most developers and publishing houses of course put a ridiculous amount of money into it, with signed developer kits, and .. in some cases.. pretty amazing svn-discipline. And piracy is often cited as the excuse for these schemes.

But the main concern is to get people into content portals, and to key their purchases to an account that sees recurring usage..
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ambing1 Apr 16, 13
Far cry 3 had a great story and fun missions and you could start another game on a harder difficulty right after finishing the easier one and it doesn´t get boring. I thought the game can´t possibly get any better but Blood Dragon seems badass.
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