Neoseeker : News : RIAA says DRM is dead
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VeGiTAX2 Jul 20, 09
Not bad on their part, and the gaming industry would see a boost if it meant that you weren't leasing your games for 2-3 installs per purchased copy. Probably one of the more annoying things to deal with really, especially when one can factor in major hardware changes to the list of what might constitute a re-activation of the software.
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chautemoc Jul 20, 09
That's definitely one of the most absurd implementations (along with online activation) -- thankfully most companies like 2K and EA have released revoke tools...those should've been mandatory from the beginning, otherwise you're basically just asking people to pirate instead.
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Guest Jul 20, 09
...and RIAA is in ICU, particularly after the Deborah Foster lawsuit fiasco, among others. 20th century thinking in a 21st century world...just like the rest of the industry dinosaurs.

Hey, Sony tried it with proprietaries like Betamax, ATRAC, etc. DRM is a different verse of the same ol' song.

Thank goodness I can copy my CDs to cassette! ;-)
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Guest Jul 20, 09
What does this mean for all the songs I purchased through iTunes. Can they now strip the DRM and give me the songs DRM free?
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Guest Jul 20, 09
@jtsblog

Yes, you can. It's called iTunes Plus, and every song sold now is Plus, and you can upgrade your library for .30 a song. (Look for Upgrade to iTunes Plus)
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Guest Jul 20, 09
@jtsblog

When Apple first announced they were selling most of their catalog DRM free they also said you can strip the DRM from your current collection for something like 30 cents a song. I haven't done this myself, or even looked up the way it is done, but that's what was said, fwiw.
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VeGiTAX2 Jul 20, 09
quote jtsblog
What does this mean for all the songs I purchased through iTunes. Can they now strip the DRM and give me the songs DRM free?
Doubt it, when iTunes went DRM free they noted it was applicable to future transactions not prior transactions. Also of course that it would be rolled out in stages across their catalog.
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Guest Jul 20, 09
The problem is that RIAA and the other "agents" fell victim to the current "get all you can" philosophy. They decided that the copyright laws were not draconian enough for them, they wanted fear of the RIAA, not the courts. They didn't go for a copyright violation in any of the egregious cases, to my knowledge. The wise heads that designed the original copyright laws realized there may be legitimate reasons for copying someone's work. If I write a book, it could be resold as "used" for a century. Someone who made notes from it may continue to use those notes for their personal use. The problem is that people thought that they bought the disc,[/u] and it's contents should be theirs as well. That is correct to a point. You can resell your game or music disc without problem. While not specifically allowed, if you have a copy you made for yourself, you [u]should be able to continue to use it even if you sold or gave away the original disc. It is when you start distributing the material from the disc to multiple other people for free that you get into trouble. The DRM isn't wrong, It is (1)poorly thought out and designed, (2)extremely poorly interpreted-and this is the fault of the legislators that voted on it, (3)and very, very poorly implemented. But this is in keeping with the current governing philosophy in this country-criminalize anything that just may, possibly, occasionally, potentially, hurt the interest of some corporation somewhere. Just saying.
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Guest Jul 20, 09
DRM is not 'officially' dead, but is not longer receiving the heavy push from industry that it had in years past. It will be officially deat in the music industry when it no longer appears in your purchase - but understand that DRM is also an industry, and their false promises are what drove its inception and acceptance.

Regarding software DRM, I think it is only a matter of time before industry realizes that customers do not want an unauthorized program, or archaic requirements, attached to software they legally purchase. I know most of my friends will download pirated copies of the games they buy just to avoid the DRM impact on their machines or the inconvenience of online control or putting the CD in the drive. In a word, ridiculous.
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kspiess Jul 20, 09
DRM is dead ? What is going to protect all the games and movies? Won't they all get pirated now?
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