Liberty or Death FAQ/Strategy Guide v1.0
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: : : : Liberty or Death FAQ/Strategy Guide

Liberty or Death FAQ/Strategy Guide

by Apathetic Aardvark   Updated to v1.0 on
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                                 Liberty or Death

Copyright 2004, Apathetic Aardvark                 Email: sinenomine@gmail.com
All rights reserved                                  Version 1.0    12/17/2004

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                         i) Disclaimer (Legal stuff)
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Copyright 2004, Apathetic Aardvark
All rights reserved.

The following sites have my permission to post this;
www.gamefaqs.com

Any site, magazine, or other form of media, that is not included on this list
caught hosting this guide without my written consent is in violation of 
copyright laws and will be prosecuted to the full extent of the laws.

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                           Selecting a game to play
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The Game Menu
       
      - New Game - This option allows a player to begin a new game.
      - Load Game - This option allows a player to load one of up to two saved
                    games.

Setting Up a New Game

      - Human vs Computer 
      - Human vs Human - When one C&C is defeated, the human is replaced by a
                         Computer player for the duration of the game.
      - Computer vs Computer

Choosing Your Side
      
      - American - George Washington C&C
      - British - Thomas Gage C&C

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                             Districts & Government
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There are 53 districts in liberty or death, taking up what today we consider
most of the east coast of the U.S.A. and a few parts of Canada.  Each district
may only be controlled by either the Colonists or the British.  The highest
ranking officer in that district will assume command.

The game can only be won by the British if they or loyalists to them control 
all 53 of the districts.  The Colonists may win in the same manner, but can
also win if they hold out until 1820, when the King of England goes insane.

Here is a list of the Districts, in brackets is the side which starts out the
game with control of the district in question, and with how many officers
stationed there.  Most districts start with no one in control.

1. St. John
2. Penobscot Bay
3. Waterville
4. Fort Western
5. Boston [British, 7]
6. Springfield [American, 11]
7. Quebec [British, 2]
8. Three Rivers [British, 2]
9. Montreal [British, 2]
10. Berlin
11. Portsmouth [American Allies, 2]
12. Norwich
13. Ticonderoga [American, 2]
14. Bennington [American, 1]
15. Albany [American, 2]
16. Fort Stanwix [British Loyalist, 2]
17. Fort Niagara
18. White Plains [American, 2]
19. Long Island [American, 2]
20. Newport [American, 2]
21. New London [American, 2]
22. Hartford [American Allies, 3]
23. Monmouth
24. Trenton
25. Wyoming
26. Venango
27. Philadelphia * - This is where the Continental Congress meets.
28. Susquehanna
29. Pittsburgh
30. New Castle
31. Head of Elk
32. Baltimore
33. Alexandria [American Allies, 1]
34. Winchester
35. Norfolk [American Allies, 1]
36. Richmond
37. Roanoke
38. Warrenton
39. Guilford
40. New Bern [American Allies, 2]
41. Wilmington [British Loyalist, 2]
42. Charlotte
43. Georgetown
44. Camden
45. Ninety-Six
46. Charles Town [American Allies, 1]
47. Atlanta
48. Augusta
49. Savannah
50. Columbus
51. St. Augustine [British, 2]
52. Apalachee [British, 1]
53. Mobile [British, 1]

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The American Government is made up of Representatives and the Continental 
Congress.  William Vernon and John Adams will always have about the highest 
support.  If it gets to the mid 50s though, you must be doing quite poorly.

Representative of Canada Ben Franklin
Representative of Massachusetts Samuel Adams
Representative of New Hampshire Josiah Bartlette
Representative of Connecticut Roger Sherman
Representative of New York John Jay
Representative of Pennsylvania John Dickinson
Representative of Maryland Samuel Chase
Representative of Virginia Patrick Henry
Representative of Georgia Lyman Hall
Representative of South Carolina Edward Rutledge
Representative of Florida Button Gwinnett
Representative of North Carolina William Hooper
Representative of Delaware Caesar Rodney
Representative of New Jersey Richard Stockton
Representative of Rhode Island Stephen Hopkins
Superintendent of Finance Robert Morris
Secretary of Foreign Affairs Silas Deane
Board of War Chairman John Adams
Marine Committee Chairman William Vernon
President of Congress John Hancock

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The British Government is made up of Governors and Parliament.  The War 
Secretary and the Lord of Admiralty will almost always have the highest trust 
level for a player.  If that trust with those two drops under 65, look out, it 
is bad news.

Governor of Canada Frederick Haldimand
Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson
Governor of New Hampshire John Wentworth
Governor of Connecticut Jonathan Trumbell
Governor of New York William Lord Tryon
Governor of Pennsylvania John Penn
Governor of Maryland Robert Eden
Governor of Virginal John Lord Dunmore
Governor of Georgia James Wright
Governor of South Carolina William Lord Campbell
Governor of Florida Patrick Tonyn
Governor of North Carolina Josiah Martin
Governor of Delaware John McKinly
Governor of New Jersey William Livingston
Governor of Rhode Island Joseph Wanton
Secretary of the Treasury George Greville
Secretary of State for Colonies William Legge
Secretary of State for War Lord Barrington
Lord of the Admiralty Lord Sandwich
Prime Minister of Parliament Lord North


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                  Continental Congress and The House of Commons
*******************************************************************************

The Colonists have a Continental Congress, which is their so called governing 
body throughout the game.  They provide funding, additional troops, promotions,
and fleets.  In the first meeting, there will be 1534 gold to be spent for a
three month cycle [6 Turns].  The navy in this cycle will be unable to aid a
player at all.  The ground based troops will be able to send a few regiments to
Northern, Central or Southern areas of the map.  Officers demand money for 
their services at every congressional meeting.  It's recommended to stay with 
the "normal" pay, or else they may begin to lose loyalty.  But, do not be
afraid to give them a bit less than usual, especially when times are tight. 
A request to build up a fleet will follow.  Each fleet power [100 max] costs
50 gold.  Money given to regiments is the final step of the process.  If a
player controls 10 regiments and gives 100 gold, each regiment will receive 
10 gold of that.  There is not much point in savings, so do not bother.

The British House of Commons functions in more or less the same way as the 
Continental congress.  However, in the first stage of the game the British
player will have a much larger budget, 4257 gold to play with.  They can ask
for ground support in the same way as the Continental Congress can.  However,
the British will be able to use their navy on the first meeting.  A player may
ask for an attempt to gain command of the sea, which on the first turn the
British have about a 100% chance to command any waters they choose to.  A
Joint attack is also an option, as is transportation of men, which will place
a fleet on any water accessible town controlled by allies.  Troops may be moved
or carried into battle against other water accessible locations with this 
command.  The British pay their officers in the same way as the colonists. 
The British can also hire mercenary regiments to aid their cause.  Each
mercenary regiment costs 100 gold.  The British also end their meetings of
Parliament by distributing money to each of the regiments in the same way as 
the Colonists can.

After the legislative bodies have met, a brief event will show which power in
the game gained control of the Northern, Central and Southern seas.  Any world
event will also take place at this time.

In subsequent meetings of the Continental Congress, the colonists will be able
to choose where to use their navy.  Both the House of Commons and the 
Continental Congress will be able to promote various members of their armies to
higher ranks.  Promotions increase the reputation and loyalty of the officers
they are given too, and also boost the moral of the regiment that officer
commands.  Promotions are given out in larger numbers when the government is
more favorable to your work.  With higher rank comes a higher paycheck, though.

It is also possible to release prisoners for money in this stage of the game. 
Other tasks both sides can do are; repay loans, have a possible impeachment / 
vote of no confidence of their respective C&Cs.

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                                 Taking a Turn
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Each district controlled by a player gets two turns per month.  This amounts to
six turns, per district, per meeting of the governments.  The highest ranking
officer in any district is put in charge of a turn.  Almost every action
requires "Body", a stat which all officers have.  1/4th of all body is returned
at the end of a turn in preparation for the next.  Most officers have between
90 and 100 body, so it may take about five turns to replenish from 0 body to 
100 body.  The other thing necessary for most actions is gold.  Each District
has its own gold supply.  The main menu of a district looks like:

-------------------------      ---------
Date               State|     |Domestic |
#: District Name   Fleet|     |Materials|
---------               |     |Personnel|
        |               |     |Military |
Portrait|Officer        |     |Info     |
        |Name           |      ---------
        |               |
---------               |
                        |
Troops       Gold       |
Officers     Food       |
Support      Gun Powder |
                        |
------------------------|

if the right arrow key is hit, another menu appears near the bottom

-------|                |
                        |
Infantry       Economy  |  <--- How probable investors are to help you
Calvary        Prices   |  <--- from 50% to 200% the normal cost of goods
Guerilla       Cannons  |
Engineers      Boats    |
                        |
------------------------|

From the smaller menu to the right, a player may select which category of 
actions she or he wishes to select from.  I will list what the action does and
how much body and gold performing such an action takes.


Domestic - This entire category pertains to actions which are done on behalf of
the district.  These actions are generally done to improve economic well being
of the district or to make the officers commanding it more popular.

   Parade - A parade is a way to raise support in a district.  Every soldier in
   the district may participate in the parade.  Parades are free of charge, but
   cost 40 body to perform.  Officers with a higher reputation stat generally
   get a better response from a parade.  Multiple officers in the parade also
   gives a better public opinion rise.

   Gazette - A gazette passes out pamphlets to the local civilians.  Unlike a
   parade, doing a gazette costs 100 gold.  It takes less body, only 20, and
   only one officer may be in charge of giving out the gazette.  The positive
   effects are based on tactics.  Reputation may also be a minor factor.  This
   is far more useful than a parade, provided you can afford it. 

   Send - Allows an officer to send supplies to an adjacent district by ground.
   This action requires 30 body.  Rations, Powder and Gold may be sent.  Goods
   may also be sent by sea if a fleet is located in the sending district.

   Borrow - Borrowing allows an officer to obtain a decent amount of gold from
   local investors.  All borrowed funds have interest which must be repaid at
   some point.  Borrowing does require 20 body to perform, although the game
   does not tell you that.  If public support is low, or if a player is doing
   quite poorly, local investors may not lend any gold at all.  Investors will
   also not offer gold to borrow of the economy in the district is poor.

Materials - This menu is for the maintenance aspect of a district.  Through 
this menu, a player may buy all the necessities, and some of the luxuries that
an officer will need.

   Buy Food - Soldiers need food to live.  Every ten soldiers eat 1 food in the
   time span of one turn.  If a district runs out of food, soldiers will leave
   their regiments to go live off of the land.  Because of this, having a 
   supply of food is needed.  Buying food requires an officer to use 20 body.
   Food is very cheap, generally ranging from 16 food for one gold, all the
   way up to a few hundred food for one gold.

   Buy Powder - Gun powder is needed for muskets and cannons to shoot. 
   Without powder, any firefight will result in many more casualties for the
   player with no powder.  Powder is quite cheap, though usually not quite as
   cheap as food is.  It requires 20 body to buy powder.  Exercises such as
   training troops do not use up gunpowder.

   Buy Arms - Soldiers require guns to fight effectively.  The stat every 
   officer has known as ARMS, is a percentage based figure of how many of that
   officers soldiers are equipped with guns.  If the regiment has 500 troops
   and the ARMS number is 60, only 300 troops are actually armed.  When 
   soldiers are killed, and new ones drafted in their place, the ARMS number
   goes way down.  Anyway, it takes 20 body to go shopping for guns, a license
   also... just kidding.  Arms are quite expensive compared to other things
   you more or less need. Few regiments start with over 60% of its soldiers
   armed, so buying guns will be very costly in bulk.  The standard rate is
   one arm for one gold.

   Build Cannon - Cannons allow for siege attacks on enemy regiments or forts.
   However, only officers with tactics higher than 70 can build them.  Building
   a cannon requires 40 body.  Any infantry or engineering unit may use the
   the cannon, but it is best left for engineers, as they get the full range.
   Cannons are also very expensive, often costing in excess of 500 gold just 
   for one.  They are very nice to have though, since using barrage will hurt
   enemy troops, but none of your own.

   Build Boats - Any officer may use his [that is not sexist, there is not a 
   single female officer in the entire game] regiment to construct small boats.
   These boats are used primarily to cross rivers.  Some battlefields require
   the use of boats or fleets to attack.  It takes 40 body to build a boat.  
   Any regiment may use the boat.  Boats are also very expensive, often costing
   over 300 gold to build.  The officer must have at least 50 tactics to build
   boats.

Personnel - This menu applies mostly to officers and keeping them happy.  It 
will probably be the least used menu of them all.  

   Recruit - Recruiting allows an officer to recruit a loyalist officer, and
   thus its entire regiment so that a player may directly control that unit.
   This is important, many loyalists, while they may aid a players side, will
   often not perform certain tasks.  In addition, most loyalists are very 
   poorly armed and train, and falter quickly in battle.  Recruiting takes
   30 body and must be done by the district commander.  Recruiting can cost
   money.  The district commander may offer up to 100 gold to the officer.  
   This is rather pointless.  Most officers who will join at 100 gold, will
   also join for 10 gold. There are some loyalist officers who seem to be
   impossible to recruit. Also, un-recruited allies will only fight in the
   state in which they are from, and any adjacent district to that state, 
   making their range quite limited.

   Bribe - This command tries to pay off an enemy officer into bringing his
   regiment to your side.  The district must be adjacent to yours, and this
   option is only available after spying on the district in question.  This
   takes 40 body.

   Bonus - A bonus gives an officer extra gold.  This is done to boost the
   loyalty of the officer and the morale of the soldiers in that officers
   regiment.  It takes 20 body to institute a bribe and the bribe may be of any
   sum of gold, up to 100.  This command is pretty useless, as the increase in
   loyalty generally returns to its previous level in three or four turns,
   especially on officers such as Benedict Arnold.  A bonus may be instituted
   for any officer in a district, by that districts commander.  Additionally,
   the C-C may give a bonus to any officer in any district.

   Furlough - A furlough sends a unit on an extended leave of absence.  It 
   costs 20 body for the district commander to institute a furlough.  The 
   action lasts 1 to 3 turns, user selectable.  This is a cheap way of giving
   a bonus, but at the cost of not having the furloughed regiments for a few
   turns.

   Authorize - This option is available to the Commander in Chief only.  It
   allows any district controlled by a players army to conduct its turns on
   its own.  Essentially, the district becomes commanded by loyalists until the
   C-C cancels the authorization.  This feature has pros and cons.  The good
   news is, when you control half of the districts, you need not control the
   ones way off of your lines.  The bad news, is of course, districts can do
   whatever they want.  Often, the computer will move the officers into other
   districts, send supplies until it runs itself dry.  If a higher ranking 
   allied officers enters the district which is authorized, the authorization
   will be automatically cancelled.  This action requires no body and takes
   effect immediately.

Military - Ah, the menu I'm sure you have been waiting for.  This is the menu
which allows you to do various thing required to kick ass and take names.

   Move - This option allows regiments to move from one district to another.
   By sea, regiments can move up to half of the map away, provided the intended
   district is sea accessible.  By land, regiments may move one adjacent 
   district away.  Moving requires 30 body for every officer who is moved.  The
   officers may take Food, Powder and Gold with them.  This is a great way to
   reinforce the front lines.  

   Draft - Drafting is a quick way to get a lot of soldiers replenished.  The
   Officer chosen to lead the will need 20 body.  The cost to draft soldiers
   varies, but it is often about 2 soldiers for every 1 gold.  If enough
   soldiers are drafted to fill every regiment, they will automatically be put
   in regiments.  If not, the player gets to decide who goes where.  It is 
   important to know drafted soldiers are neither trained well or equipped with
   weapons, so getting them battle ready is a fairly long process.

   Re-Form - This command takes 20 body from the district commander.  It allows
   any regiment which is not fully staffed to run off and get in battle ready
   status.  It costs no money to do this, but, it requires an obscene amount of
   turns.  Also, regiments which are re-forming can not help the district while
   they are doing so.  The regiment will eventually return fully manned.

   Drill - Soldiers who are well trained are better than soldiers who are not.
   Drilling takes 40 body per officer who participates.  Officers with higher
   leadership stats are better able to increase the Training stat than officers
   who are not good leaders.  The tactics stat may also play a minor role, but
   I do not have conclusive evidence of that.  Aside from buying arms, training
   is the best way to increase a regiments battle abilities.

   Battle - Ah, the one command this game most certainly needs.  Any regiment
   going into battle on offense requires 40 body to do so.  Up to eight
   regiments may attack from a district.  Adjacent districts, up to two, may
   also send up to six regiments to aid.  Defending districts may also request
   aid from neighbors as well.  When attacking, the officers must bring with
   them; rations and powder.  They also have the option to bring gold with in
   the event they capture the district they are attacking.  The nice advisor
   will tell you how much food you need, but that does not take into account
   the neighboring aid, so if you intend to use aid make sure to bring extra
   food.  Powder is another story.  In my own experience,  there's very little
   reason not to bring it all, as long as you think you can win.  Running out
   of gunpowder is an almost assured way to lose a battle.

   Organize - Allows you to swap cannons and boats around the regiments located
   in the district.  This is useful at times, I suppose.

Info - This menu is... well, informative.  Because of that, you will probably
use it quite infrequently, but it does have some useful commands.

   Officer - This choice allows you to review all of the information of any
   officer under you command.  It shows all of their main stats and any
   temporary status if they apply.

   District - This option allows a player to view the status of any allied or
   empty district.  It shows rations, powder, gold, as well as the terrain of
   what the battlefield looks like.  One may also view all officers in the
   district.  However, a player may not view any information on a district
   which is controlled by the enemy.

   Government - This option shows the representatives or royal governors of all
   the states.  One may also view the heads of the congress and parliament.  
   This is pretty useless, aside from seeing how much support you have, but 
   that should be determinable from how much of the map you control

   States - This option shows how well controlled a state is by either the
   British or American side.  The bluer the state name, the more control the
   colonists have over it.  The more reddish that it is, designates how much
   control the British have over it.  This determination seems to be made by
   the amount of troops in that state, not the land area occupied.

   Spy - The spy option is one of the trickiest in the game.  It requires an
   officer other than the district commander to use 30 body and anywhere from
   0 to 100 gold in an attempt to bribe someone in an enemy territory for
   information on that district.  If successful, the information views the same
   way in which the "District" command does.  If the command fails, the officer
   sent to spy is taken prisoner.  Generally, it is bad to send someone who is
   inept and carrying no money.  The loyalty of the opponents officers also 
   play a big role.  If they are very loyal, the spy command will almost never
   succeed.  Depending on the distance from the district one spies from, will
   determine how many turns it takes to find out the outcome of the action.


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                                     Battle
*******************************************************************************

Battles are the main way of getting new districts under your control.  Battles
may be initiated from land or by sea.  By land, the range is any adjacent
district, by sea, the range is about half of the entire map.  The attacker may
bring up to eight regiments into the district which is being attacked.  That
attacker may also ask for backup from up to two districts, bringing as many as
six regiments a piece.  The defender may have up to twenty regiments defending
it and may request assistance from two neighboring districts, each able to send
six regiments.  Each player may also bring up to two fleets.  When it is all
said and done, a battle could realistically have 52 regiments and 4 fleets in
massive combat.  All assisting districts may not bring in fleets, nor may they
bring their district commanders.

Battles last for up to 15 days, all food and powder needs are taken from the
lead attacking district and the defending district.  So be sure to bring
enough food and powder for your allies.

There are four types of units in battle; Infantry, Cavalry, Guerillas and
engineers/artillery.  Each unit has different properties and attacks.  All
unit types have 250 soldiers, except for infantry which have 500 of them.

Infantry - The most common type of unit.  They are simple ground soldiers who
carry their muskets into battle.  If they run low on gunpowder, or if you want
to, the infantry units may use their bayonets to attack.  Bayonet charges were
particularly bloody, and often cause enemy regiments to run backwards.  This
command may not be done against units located in a fort or town.  Infantry 
units have a low movement range as well.

Cavalry - These units are comprised of soldiers on horseback.  They are the
most mobile unit type in the game.  Cavalry can move through forests and if 
they stop inside of one when an enemy can not see them, they will become
invisible until they leave the forest or a unit gets too close.  They can use
this hidden ability to use an ambush attack, which generally creams any 
unsuspecting unit.  Cavalry may also use a charge attack which will run them
right through an enemy unit.  This attack may not be used on units in forts or
towns though.

Guerilla - These are ground units trained specially for night and surprise
combat.  They have decent movement ranges and my traverse even the tallest of
mountains.  Like cavalry, guerilla units have the ability to ambush other 
units.  They are much more effective at night, than they are in the day.

Engineer/Artillery - These units are great.  They sadly move poorly and are
ill suited to get in a close firefight.  When an engineering unit has a cannon
in its possession, it will gain the ability to barrage the enemy.  This attack
has a range of two squares in the day time, but only one at night.  This
attack is very nice because it kills enemies without any lost life to the
engineering regiment itself.  This is a great way to get a few free kills on an
enemy unit before sending in the meat.  This is also a great way to attack
forts.  These units can also build bridges across small rivers, or knock down
bridges.  This is a very valuable tool on many of the battlefields.

Fleets - Navies of all the countries are powerful.  Fleets range in strength
from 1 boat to 100.  A player can not directly control its fleet, but the
computer will move it for them.  Fleets have enormous guns and can cause
massive casualties to any ground unit too close to the shore.  Fleets will
often combat each other when possible.  Attacking a fleet with a ground unit is
generally a good way to lose the battle in a fast hurry.

Any unit with boats may set one on fire and attempt to crash it into enemy
water vessels to inflict massive damage. This attack is not very practical, 
but it does come in handy sometimes.

While units are very important in battle [duh], the terrain can be equally as
useful.  There are several terrain types in Liberty or Death, each which 
requires a certain amount of movement points to get through, and various
offensive/defensive advantages to the unit standing on it.

Normal - This ground is just plain open grass.  Movement cost is three and it
offers no special bonuses for being on it.

Forest - This type of land can only be moved on by cavalry and guerilla.  This
type of land allows for ambush attacks and provide a bit of cover for any unit
stationed inside.

Hill - Hills are hard to get over, taking five movement points.  They do
however represent the high ground, which gives a slight bonus from being on
one.

Mountain - Only guerillas can move into mountains.  They take a lot of 
movement and allow for ambush attacks.  They are very high ground and offer
some protection because of that.

Water - Only units with boats can move in water.  It requires five movement and
offers no protections to speak of.

Shallow - Shallows may only be moved on by boats.  They take four movement and
offer no defensive advantages.

Bridges - These are constructed over rivers or very small lakes.  While on a 
bridge, a unit is an easier target.  If the bridge is destroyed while a unit is
on it, that unit is lost.

Sea - Large bodies of water.  Fleets and boats may move in them.  They take up
five movement and offer no defensive advantages.

Town - Towns defensive bonus seems to reflect the popular support the district
has for the unit inside of it.

Forts - There are two types of forts, both give huge defensive bonuses to the
units which are inside of them.  These are often placed right in the heart of
an area where a defender puts its troops.


*******************************************************************************
                                    Officers
*******************************************************************************

There are 250 officers in Liberty or Death.  With the French and Spanish aid,
the colonists will have access to more of these officers.  Officers have many
stats which are crucial to their performance.  Body is the most important, it
is the stat on which all actions are based.  Body recovers 25% of its 
maximum value per turn, unless the officer is injured or the regiment is ill
or under the influence of bad weather.  Leadership is the next stat, it 
determines how well the regiment follows the orders of the officer.  It is
critical to get faster training and also helps out in battles.  Tactics is 
another very important stat.  It determines many important factors in combat
which are directly related to unit losses.  Tactics is also useful in building
boats and cannons.  Discipline is the least useful of the primary stats, it
is good for keeping morale of the regiment up, but not much else.  All four
of these stats will remain the same for an officer all game long.  Reputation
switches around, but I have listed the starting reputation for officers.  It
will rise if they are heroes on the battlefield, promoted, or if the army they
represent is doing well in the war.

Ranks signify who is in command of a district.  The highest ranking officer is
in command.  Higher ranking soldiers also get paid more than lower ranking
officers.  If an officer is promoted in the congressional phase, his reputation
and loyalty will increase.  In addition, troop morale in that regiment will go
up.  Another attribute is the officers home.  This information only matters on
Revolutionary Militia and Loyalist Army units, but I have listed it on some
Continental Army ones as well.  If a unit is home in New York, it may only be
used to do tasks in the state of New York and one district adjacent to any side
of the state.  If the officer is recruited into the directly controllable army,
this will change and the officer will be able to go anywhere.  Regiment types
of the officer have also been listed by the first three letters of the type.
Infantry, Cavalry, Guerilla and Engineers.

There's 213 of the 250 officers listed here, I've kinda given up on finding
the other ones, so, MEH :P.  If you have any of them completely, please email
them to me :).


Continental Army

Name                 | Rank | Body | Ldr | Tac | Dis | Rep | Type | Home 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
George Washington    | Gen  | 100  |  97 |  58 |  98 |  80 | Inf  | VA
Horatio Gates        | Gen  |  96  |  95 |  90 |  91 |  76 | Inf  | VA
John Thomas          | Gen  | 100  |  94 |  74 |  87 |  80 | Inf  | NY
Artemas Ward         | Gen  |  82  |  92 |  64 |  95 |  80 | Inf  | MA
Israel Putnam        | Gen  |  72  |  89 |  75 |  60 |  62 | Inf  | CT
Charles Lee          | Gen  |  80  |  78 |  80 |  48 |  76 | Inf  | PA
William Washington   | Col  |  98  |  89 |  76 |  97 |  80 | Cav  | VA
Henry Knox           | Col  | 100  |  83 |  72 |  92 |  70 | Eng  | MA
John Cadwalader      | Col  |  89  |  70 |  65 |  67 |  51 | Inf  | NY
Tench Tilghman       | Maj  |  90  |  59 |  59 |  94 |  80 | Inf  | MD
David Mason          | Maj  |  60  |  30 |  30 |  30 |  30 | Eng  | MA
Return Meigs         | Maj  |  85  |  73 |  99 |  86 |  80 | Inf  | NY
Ethan Allen          | Col  | 100  |  95 |  69 |  51 |  75 | Gue  | NH
Benedict Arnold      | Col  |  99  |  75 |  81 |  40 |  60 | Inf  | CT
Richard Montgomery   | Gen  |  96  | 100 |  87 |  98 |  80 | Inf  | NY
Daniel Morgan        | Col  |  51  |  66 |  99 |  89 |  80 | Gue  | NY
Phillip Schuyler     | Gen  |  75  |  72 |  66 |  74 |  54 | Inf  | NY
William Alexander    | Col  |  90  |  82 |  71 |  81 |  67 | Inf  | SC
William Thompson     | Gen  |  95  |  81 |  94 | 100 |  80 | Inf  | PA
John Sullivan        | Col  | 100  |  68 |  73 |  92 |  80 | Inf  | NH
Aaron Burr           | Cap  |  50  |  62 |  58 |  86 |  46 | Inf  | CT
Nathan Hale          | Cap  |  70  |  77 |  57 |  61 |  41 | Inf  | CT
Nathaneael Greene    | Gen  |  95  |  91 | 100 |  90 |  66 | Inf  | RI
Christopher Greene   | Maj  |  83  |  72 |  51 |  44 |  36 | Inf  | RI
Benjamin Talmadge    | Maj  |  70  |  51 |  99 |  63 |  80 | Inf  | CT
Henry Lee            | Maj  |  86  |  90 |  81 |  83 |  60 | Cav  | NY
John P. Muhlenberg   | Col  |  85  |  88 |  71 |  98 |  61 | Inf  | Special
Johann de Kalb       | Gen  |  79  |  69 |  85 |  72 |  48 | Eng  | Special
Moses Hazen          | Maj  |  80  |  72 |  22 |  43 |  47 | Inf  | NY
Thomas Conway        | Col  |  74  |  63 |  41 |  30 |  60 | Inf  | Special
Peter Gansevoort     | Col  |  83  |  80 |  64 |  66 |  49 | Inf  | Special
Friedrich von Steuben| Gen  |  84  |  64 |  60 |  91 |  47 | Inf  | Special
Louis DuPortail      | Gen  |  89  |  78 |  95 |  92 |  42 | Eng  | Special
Joseph Laffayette    | Gen  |  67  |  98 |  76 |  84 |  97 | Inf  | Special
James Ewing          | Col  |  56  |  41 |  25 |  48 |  24 | Inf  | NY
Tadeusz Kosciuszko   | Col  |  88  |  75 |  80 |  78 |  61 | Eng  | Special
Enoch Poor           | Cap  |  85  |  64 |  78 |  65 |  47 | Inf  | NY
Kazimierz Pulaski    | Col  |  87  |  66 |  84 |  91 |  58 | Cav  | Special
James Livingston     | Col  |  79  |  50 |  60 |  52 |  41 | Inf  | NY
George Clinton       | Col  |  76  |  59 |  31 |  50 |  41 | Inf  | NY
Samuel Forman        | Col  |  87  |  65 |  55 |  55 |  56 | Inf  | NJ
Robert Kirkwood      | Cap  |  70  |  81 |  78 |  84 |  10 | Inf  | DE
John Brown           | Maj  |  85  |  70 |  73 |  65 |  45 | Inf  | PA
John Laurens         | Col  |  82  |  87 |  78 |  88 |  40 | Inf  | SC
Lachlan McIntosh     | Col  |  93  |  61 |  87 |  61 |  80 | Inf  | SC
Allen McLane         | Cap  |  80  |  71 |  83 |  53 |  42 | Cav  | PA
Alexander Hamilton   | Cap  |  90  |  72 |  43 |  81 |  64 | Eng  | NY
Alexander McDougall  | Col  |  92  |  84 |  65 |  48 |  80 | Inf  | NY
Walter Stewart       | Col  |  87  |  58 |  38 |  68 |  35 | Inf  | VA
Nicholas Herkimer    | Col  |  85  |  67 |  61 |  68 |  50 | Inf  | NY
William Douglas      | Col  |  87  |  74 |  54 |  64 |  45 | Inf  | NY 
David Franks         | Maj  |  77  |  59 |  45 |  80 |  40 | Inf  | CT
Benjamin Lincoln     | Col  |  95  |  86 |  91 |  88 |  67 | Inf  | NY
John Jameson         | Col  |  86  |  84 |  56 |  75 |  41 | Cav  | NY
John Lamb            | Cap  |  66  |  73 |  65 |  69 |  48 | Eng  | NY
Timothy Bedel        | Col  |  74  |  63 |  56 |  65 |  46 | Inf  | CT
James Wilkinson      | Maj  |  61  |  21 |  54 |  22 |  80 | Inf  | NY
Josiah Harmar        | Col  |  57  |  54 |  97 |  54 |  21 | Inf  | PA

Revolutionary Militia

Name                | Rank | Body | Ldr | Tac | Dis | Rep | Type | Home 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
John Glover         | Gen  |  86  |  80 |  60 |  52 |  50 | Inf  | CT
John Stark          | Col  |  72  |  68 |  67 |  61 |  54 | Inf  | NH
William Heath       | Col  |  79  |  60 |  65 |  50 |  37 | Inf  | NH
Thomas Knowlton     | Cap  |  68  |  65 |  97 |  65 |  45 | Gue  | CT
David Wooster       | Col  |  68  |  54 |  34 |  62 |  80 | Inf  | CT
George Clark        | Col  |  99  |  67 |  72 |  38 |  65 | Gue  | VA
William Woodford    | Col  |  46  |  74 |  68 |  94 |  80 | Inf  | VA
John Lillington     | Col  |  57  |  58 |  57 |  54 |  47 | Inf  | NC
Richard Caswell     | Col  |  78  |  63 |  41 |  72 |  22 | Inf  | NC
William Moultrie    | Col  |  66  |  61 |  69 |  43 |  80 | Inf  | SC
John Lillington     | Col  |  57  |  58 |  57 |  54 |  47 | Inf  | NC
William Campbell    | Col  |  71  |  53 |  35 |  27 |  18 | Inf  | NC
Philemon Dickinson  | Col  |  70  |  72 |  77 |  66 |  51 | Inf  | VA
Nathan Denison      | Col  |  55  |  38 |  20 |  73 |  13 | Inf  | PA
Zebulon Butler      | Maj  |  68  |  62 |  28 |  70 |  35 | Inf  | PA
Thomas Proctor      | Col  |  78  |  64 |  63 |  59 |  60 | Eng  | PA
Daniel Brodhead     | Col  |  95  |  40 |  25 |  48 |  40 | Inf  | PA
Robert Magaw        | Col  |  50  |  20 |  37 |  17 |  38 | Inf  | PA
Robert van Resselaer| Col  |  56  |  43 |  23 |  48 |  22 | Inf  | NY
Ichabod Alden       | Col  |  60  |  67 |  44 |  91 |  31 | Inf  | NY
Thomas Boyd         | Cap  |  50  |  35 |  28 |  43 |  20 | Gue  | NY
William Popham      | Maj  |  74  |  62 |  40 |  46 |  40 | Inf  | NY
William Davie       | Col  |  95  |  87 |  80 |  75 |  61 | Inf  | NY
Hugh Mercer         | Col  |  67  |  70 |  87 |  64 |  80 | Inf  | NJ
Mordecai Gist       | Maj  |  56  |  52 |  51 |  65 |  40 | Inf  | VA
Richard Butler      | Col  |  80  |  78 |  55 |  81 |  45 | Inf  | PA
Seth Warner         | Col  |  70  |  47 |  43 |  50 |  38 | Inf  | NY
James Williams      | Col  |  57  |  35 |  35 |  69 |  65 | Inf  | SC
John Sevier         | Col  |  84  |  79 |  75 |  64 |  41 | Inf  | NC
Thomas Sumpter      | Col  |  61  |  62 |  32 |  41 |  24 | Gue  | SC
Isaac Huger         | Col  |  50  |  31 |  37 |  80 |  35 | Inf  | SC
George Weedon       | Col  |  59  |  61 |  55 | 100 |  81 | Inf  | VA
Charles McDowell    | Col  |  70  |  61 |  44 |  69 |  44 | Inf  | NC
Henry Dearborn      | Cap  |  90  |  68 |  47 |  88 |  31 | Inf  | NY
Joshua Huddy        | Cap  |  72  |  45 |  40 |  44 |  32 | Inf  | NY
Anthony Wayne       | Col  |  87  |  90 |  68 |  45 |  80 | Inf  | PA
James Wadsworth     | Col  | 100  |  21 |  54 |  22 |  80 | Inf  | NY
William Maxwell     | Col  |  49  |  54 |  59 |  46 |  45 | Inf  | NJ
David Waterbury     | Col  |  84  |  65 |  45 |  64 |  45 | Inf  | NH
Francis Barber      | Maj  |  55  |  37 |  26 |  11 |  10 | Inf  | NJ
Elias Dayton        | Col  |  85  |  84 |  65 |  77 |  47 | Inf  | NJ
John Armstrong      | Col  |  62  |  69 |  44 |  70 |  50 | Inf  | PA
Arthur St. Clair    | Col  |  97  |  68 |  52 |  87 |  80 | Inf  | PA
Isaac Shelby        | Col  |  57  |  32 |  40 |  81 |  34 | Inf  | NC
James Bedlock       | Cap  |  57  |  65 |  45 |  75 |  54 | Inf  | PA
Robert Howe         | Col  |  85  |  80 |  61 |  58 |  58 | Inf  | NC
Francis Marion      | Col  |  92  |  82 |  95 |  80 |  56 | Gue  | SC
Benjamin Cleveland  | Col  |  70  |  57 |  65 |  41 |  45 | Inf  | NC
Issac Hayne         | Col  |  50  |  36 |  36 |  47 |  10 | Inf  | SC
William Ledyard     | Col  |  62  |  40 |  20 |  50 |  35 | Inf  | CT
Stephen Olney       | Cap  |  63  |  32 |  74 |  42 |  42 | Inf  | RI
Hezekiah Maham      | Col  |  52  |  47 |  57 |  34 |  15 | Eng  | SC 
Andrew Pickens      | Col  |  89  |  78 |  76 |  30 |  80 | Inf  | SC
John Ashe           | Col  |  73  |  48 |  32 |  70 |  46 | Inf  | NC
Joseph McDowell     | Col  |  92  |  84 |  65 |  47 |  80 | Inf  | NC
Gold Silliman       | Col  |  88  |  65 |  49 |  56 |  10 | Inf  | NY
Marinus Willett     | Cap  |  97  |  91 |  85 |  94 |  80 | Eng  | NY
John Gunby          | Col  |  77  |  62 |  74 |  85 |  45 | Inf  | MD
William Smallwood   | Col  |  53  |  40 |  58 |  95 |  80 | Inf  | MD
Richard Caswell     | Col  |  78  |  65 |  41 |  72 |  22 | Inf  | NC
John Haslet         | Col  |  54  |  61 |  16 |  42 |  18 | Inf  | DE
William Barton      | Col  |  71  |  79 |  79 |  66 |  46 | Inf  | RI
William Moultrie    | Col  |  66  |  61 |  69 |  43 |  80 | Inf  | SC
James Varnum        | Col  | 100  |  62 |  60 |  63 |  80 | Inf  | RI
Edward Hand         | Col  |  84  |  80 |  78 |  90 |  43 | Inf  | NY

French Army

Name                 | Rank | Body | Ldr | Tac | Dis | Rep | Type
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Louis de Lauzun      | Col  |  68  |  65 |  35 |  95 |  40 | Cav
Jean Rochambeau      | Gen  |  79  |  85 |  84 |  86 |  81 | Inf
Donatien Rochambeau  | Col  |  83  |  62 |  69 |  75 |  62 | Inf
Claude de Choisy     | Gen  |  65  |  54 |  44 |  53 |  56 | Inf
Christian Deux-Ponts | Col  |  77  |  76 |  64 |  75 |  78 | Inf
Fancoise Chastellux  | Gen  |  77  |  45 |  39 |  44 |  34 | Inf
Claude-Anne St. Simon| Gen  |  78  |  65 |  45 |  75 |  57 | Eng
Louis de Noailles    | Col  |  75  |  63 |  68 |  50 |  55 | Inf
Claude Blanchard     | Maj  |  86  |  53 |  67 |  56 |  46 | Inf

Spanish Army

Name               | Rank | Body | Ldr | Tac | Dis | Rep | Type 
---------------------------------------------------------------
Prudencio Cotes    | Maj  |  99  |  46 |  65 |  35 |  61 | Inf
Rodrigo Aguilar    | Cap  |  87  |  57 |  76 |  47 |  49 | Inf
Bernardo de Galves | Maj  |  87  |  84 |  98 |  65 |  51 | Inf
Francisco Bouligny | Cap  |  75  |  45 |  64 |  57 |  85 | Inf
Ricardo Montenegro | Cap  |  70  |  67 |  71 |  55 |  66 | Cav


Due to some accidental confusion on my part, some members listed under "Royal"
Army might actually be members of the "Loyalist" army.

Royal Army

Name                   | Rank | Body | Ldr | Tac | Dis | Rep | Type
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Charles Cornwallis     | Gen  |  98  |  88 |  80 |  91 |  79 | Inf
John Burgoyne          | Gen  |  60  |  80 |  60 |  75 |  60 | Cav
Guy Carleton           | Gen  |  96  |  94 |  95 |  98 |  72 | Inf
John Andre             | Cap  |  89  |  88 |  51 |  93 |  57 | Inf
Thomas Gage            | Gen  |  75  |  45 |  25 |  30 |  30 | Inf
Henry Clinton          | Gen  |  97  |  90 |  99 |  93 |  40 | Inf
William Howe           | Gen  |  82  |  92 |  90 |  89 |  79 | Inf
Robert Pigot           | Gen  |  69  |  65 |  78 |  84 |  80 | Inf
James Fitzwalter       | Col  |  68  |  55 |  30 |  45 |  35 | Inf
Hugh McKenzie          | Maj  |  88  |  70 |  65 |  70 |  40 | Inf
Charles Asgill         | Cap  |  75  |  35 |  56 |  67 |  46 | Inf
Simon Fraser           | Gen  |  60  |  75 |  69 |  72 |  51 | Inf
Alexander Leslie       | Cap  |  95  |  50 |  38 |  47 |  50 | Inf
George Turnbull        | Col  |  65  |  65 |  48 |  66 |  56 | Inf
Augstine Prevost       | Col  |  86  |  92 |  73 |  80 |  80 | Cav
Francis Rawdon         | Col  |  77  |  59 |  37 |  65 |  74 | Inf
Elias Durnford         | Cap  |  75  |  75 |  56 |  56 |  74 | Eng
Charles DuBuysson      | Maj  |  60  |  50 |  61 |  67 |  39 | Inf
William Sutherland     | Cap  |  65  |  32 |  32 |  62 |  38 | Inf
Wilhelm von Knyphausen | Gen  |  93  |  85 |  73 |  89 |  57 | Inf
Leopold von Heister    | Gen  |  85  |  79 |  74 |  74 |  57 | Inf
Carl von Donop         | Col  |  65  |  62 |  69 |  64 |  46 | Inf
Christian Breymann     | Col  |  65  |  54 |  65 |  45 |  46 | Inf
Friedrich Riedesel     | Col  |  70  |  66 |  53 |  45 |  58 | Inf
James Paterson         | Col  |  72  |  60 |  42 |  53 |  42 | Inf
Johann Holder          | Maj  |  79  |  79 |  77 |  72 |  42 | Eng
Tomas Futter           | Maj  |  98  |  54 |  65 |  57 |  35 | Cav
James Wemyss           | Maj  |  65  |  34 |  54 |  54 |  65 | Inf
Alexander Stewart      | Cap  |  71  |  41 |  36 |  65 |  40 | Inf
Mattias Fermoy         | Gen  |  70  |  65 |  60 |  65 |  46 | Inf
Nisbet Balfour         | Col  |  80  |  76 |  80 |  63 |  40 | Inf
Johann Rall            | Col  |  75  |  64 |  62 |  55 |  41 | Inf
Friedrich Baum         | Col  |  88  |  62 |  30 |  79 |  32 | Inf
Alexander Dickson      | Col  |  75  |  64 |  45 |  35 |  54 | Inf
Karl Josef Jaegerman   | Cap  |  97  |  54 |  74 |  64 |  54 | Gue
Johann von Krafft      | Cap  |  78  |  42 |  54 |  84 |  54 | Inf
Meier Roth             | Cap  |  84  |  57 |  45 |  75 |  25 | Inf
Helmut Wolf            | Cap  |  88  |  25 |  54 |  84 |  56 | Inf
Johann Ewald           | Cap  |  76  |  36 |  46 |  76 |  56 | Inf
Abraham d' Aubant      | Cap  |  64  |  43 |  56 |  43 |  65 | Eng
John Barker            | Cap  |  74  |  64 |  43 |  63 |  34 | Inf
George Garth           | Gen  |  75  |  59 |  51 |  55 |  12 | Inf
Nicolas Sauber         | Maj  |  85  |  32 |  43 |  64 |  12 | Eng
Gunter Tubussing       | Cap  |  88  |  68 |  46 |  68 |  15 | Cav
Thomas Dundas          | Col  |  66  |  58 |  56 |  32 |  28 | Inf
Paston Gould           | Col  |  65  |  70 |  57 |  74 |  67 | Inf
Richard Prescott       | Gen  |  71  |  47 |  44 |  72 |  70 | Inf
Patrick Ferguson       | Maj  |  50  |  75 |  48 |  79 |  56 | Cav
William Erskine        | Gen  |  88  |  82 |  60 |  59 |  37 | Inf
John Carden            | Maj  |  45  |  55 |  23 |  44 |  35 | Cav
Allen Jones            | Gen  |  48  |  41 |  36 |  43 |  31 | Inf
George Matthews        | Gen  |  97  |  86 |  69 |  74 |  18 | Inf
Henry Hamilton         | Maj  |  63  |  71 |  67 |  42 |  35 | Eng
James Armstrong        | Maj  |  70  |  66 |  78 |  61 |  45 | Inf
Chapple Norton         | Col  |  69  |  59 |  62 |  68 |  58 | Inf
Charles Preston        | Maj  |  75  |  67 |  50 |  81 |  30 | Inf
Charles Mawhood        | Col  |  68  |  65 |  84 |  54 |  51 | Inf
Allen Maclean          | Col  |  98  |  75 |  76 |  54 |  24 | Inf
John Maitland          | Col  |  47  |  61 |  68 |  73 |  84 | Inf
James Rugely           | Col  |  86  |  68 |  51 |  68 |  55 | Inf
John Hill              | Col  |  73  |  63 |  43 |  32 |  18 | Inf
Alexander Ross         | Cap  |  84  |  68 |  88 |  62 |  55 | Inf
Robert Rogers          | Maj  |  60  |  67 |  48 |  68 |  14 | Eng
John Moore             | Gen  |  60  |  66 |  61 |  81 |  62 | Eng
Banastre Tarleton      | Maj  |  92  |  65 |  60 |  38 |  80 | Cav
Thomas Pringle         | Cap  |  65  |  43 |  51 |  48 |  16 | Inf
Andrew Lewis           | Gen  |  64  |  65 |  40 |  40 |  27 | Inf
Samuel Graham          | Maj  |  60  |  66 |  59 |  52 |  37 | Inf
Francis MacLean        | Col  |  87  |  87 |  51 |  46 |  14 | Inf
Edmund Eyre            | Col  |  76  |  65 |  46 |  54 |  54 | Inf
James Craig            | Maj  |  72  |  57 |  53 |  73 |  58 | Inf
Charles O'Hara         | Gen  |  89  |  81 |  69 |  78 |  20 | Inf

Loyalist Army

Name               | Rank | Body | Ldr | Tac | Dis | Rep | Type | Home
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Donald McLeod      | Col  |  91  |  80 |  74 |  54 |  63 | Inf  | NC 
Archibald Campbell | Col  |  67  |  45 |  55 |  79 |  34 | Inf  | NC
John Butler        | Col  |  62  |  78 |  64 |  56 |  68 | Gue  | NY
Walter Butler      | Cap  |  90  |  67 |  56 |  10 |  70 | Gue  | NY
William Macpherson | Maj  |  94  |  78 |  84 |  54 |  87 | Cav  | SC
Thomas Browne      | Maj  |  75  |  70 |  20 |  68 |  51 | Inf  | SC
David Fanning      | Col  |  90  |  70 |  60 |  50 |  40 | Inf  | NJ
Abram van Buskirk  | Maj  |  50  |  23 |  27 |  44 |  10 | Inf  | NJ
La Corne St. Luc   | Col  |  78  |  64 |  87 |  56 |  45 | Inf  | CD
John Johnson       | Col  |  81  |  64 |  59 |  37 |  47 | Gue  | NY
James Logan        | Maj  |  44  |  46 |  60 |  32 |  30 | Inf  | NY
James Baird        | Cap  |  74  |  73 |  82 |  54 |  54 | Inf  | GA
John Grierson      | Col  |  58  |  42 |  41 |  46 |  17 | Inf  | GA
Beverly Robinson   | Col  |  60  |  67 |  54 |  31 |  39 | Inf  | MD
Guy Johnson        | Col  |  88  |  87 |  78 |  72 |  52 | Gue  | NY
William Tryon      | Gen  |  56  |  68 |  22 |  45 |  54 | Inf  | NY
Joseph Brandt      | Cap  |  91  |  72 |  86 |  43 |  60 | Gue  | NY
John Graves Simcoe | Col  |  60  |  55 |  52 |  51 |  75 | Gue  | NC

Officers: 224
Remaining: 26

*******************************************************************************
                                  World Events
*******************************************************************************

There are many events which will forever shape the world.  Some events only
help or hurt one side, others effect both the British and the Americans.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Turn Events - These events can happen at the beginning of every turn.  They do
not always occur though.

Attrition - Some values in the district will change, see the Seasonal Event
attrition for a better understanding of this.

Resignations - Officers with low loyalty may try to resign at the start of a
new turn.  Sometimes you can talk them into staying, other times they will 
request 50 to 250 gold from that districts reserve.  If you can not, or do not
wish to pay that officer, he will leave.

Mutiny - Caused by low morale in a regiment, soldiers will leave the unit
during the night.  The first time a unit mutinies, the regiment will lose 50%
of its troops, 50% more the next time, and on the third it will entirely 
disband, assuming you do not replenish the soldiers.

Foreign Aid - If playing as the Americans, other countries may aid you in the
way of Rations, Powder, Arms and Money.  

Bored Foreigners - These officers seem to be bored with their own lives and
wish to aid the Americans in their struggle.  They will be given a regiment
should you decide to take any on.  This is the Americans counter to the British
being able to hire German mercenaries.

New Regiments - These will appear.  Usually, each side gets at least one new
regiment per turn.  The German [Hessian] units and the British units can only
appear in districts which have access to sea.

Dutch Merchant - Appears in the early stages in the game in American controlled
areas.  He [Sorry women, you were not Dutch merchants at this point in history
either ;_; ] will sell goods at literal steals.  Stockpile for cheap.  He will
not appear after Britain declares war on the Dutch.

Prisoner Escape - Jail break!  Officers who were imprisoned manage to escape.
Is more common in Hard difficulty games or if the jails are overflowing with
enemy officers.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Seasonal Events - These events begin right after the Continental Congress ends.
They can last for many turns.  There is not always a seasonal event, except for
command at see and attrition, but the harder the difficulty, the more likely
bad events will happen.

Command of the Sea - This phase determines which power controls the three parts
of the Atlantic Ocean.  Whoever controls the waters controls what ships can
move around there.  While important, it is not absolute.

Attrition - Districts lose guns and some training every now and again.  The
ARMS goes down by about 2% or so per regiment, training about the same.  This
is hardly noticeable, but it is annoying to keep buying guns for the five 
troops who do not have any.

Fever - Fevers will effect a few districts at the same time.  While infected
with a fever, officers body recovers very slowly, loyalty and morale both go
down as well.  Fevers will continue for many turns.

Smallpox - Smallpox are very similar in effects to the fever.  The only 
difference is that troops will decline slowly as they die off because of the
infection.  No district may have both the smallpox and the fever at the exact
same time.  Smallpox also last for many turns.

Storms - Heavy rains will prevent ships from moving through the district.  In
addition, body recovers slower than usual and morale suffers.  Some soldiers
also die in storms, so regiment populations will decrease.

Heat Wave - In the summer, districts in the southern areas of the map tend to
get hit by extreme temperatures.  Officers will recover body points slower
than usual,  Morale will decrease as well.  District supplies, particularly 
food, may also be taken.  Troops also die because of high temperatures.

Severe Winter - The Northern regions are hardest hit by the winters.  Fleets
are unable to move, body recovers slowly and morale goes down.  In addition, 
supplies are exhausted and soldiers die because of the cold.  This is probably
the worst of the disasters.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Historical Events - These events closely resemble what really happened in the
American Revolution.  Granted, you can screw them up and have them occur real
late, or even early.  But, many of them will happen.  For the most part, the
American player is benefited by this category of events.

Common Sense - This pamphlet was written by Thomas Paine.  It questions the
Divine Right of Kings.  If it is able to be published, support in all 
districts for the Americans will increase dramatically.

Declaration of Independence - Will be declared if the British are removed from
all districts excluding 7,8,9 [Canada] and 51, 52, 53 [Florida].  This will
greatly increase popular support in all districts for the Americans.  Sadly,
the game is usually won by the time this happens.  A quick note, it appears if
at any point the British controlled none of these districts, that the 
Declartion can be written at any point there after, even if the British regain
control of some regions.

Anglo-Dutch War - British forces attack St. Eustatias, a Dutch port in the 
Caribbean during this war, which will end the visits of the Dutch Merchant.

British take Philadelphia - If this happens, the Continental Congress will
be exiled [presumably to New York], and support for Washington will falter.
If the Americans manage to take it back quickly, support for him will rise
immensely.

French joins the war - The Americans need to win a BIG battle for this to 
happen.  It seems to be an offensive battle too, not sure though.  Anyway,
a month or two after a major victory is scored, the French will join the
war if they feel the Americans have a chance of winning.  Rather than just
donating aid, they will actively send troops to help.

Spain joins the war - Everyone wants to get involved now, because someone is
standing up to those mean British.  Spain will join shortly after France and
will send members of its army to help out as well.  The Spanish navy is the
greatest... well, provided you do not have 8 100 power fleets at this point.

Nathan Hale Executed - If Hale is caught spying, or captured in battle, the
British may try to execute him.  If they do, he will give a great speech 
before being killed which will elevate him to the status of Martyr.  Support
for America will rise all over the place.  It is not often a bad idea to 
intentionally get Hale captured.

Benedict Arnold Defects - If Arnold's loyalty is low, there is a good chance
he will join the side of the British if they are doing well in the war.  
Unlike the real revolution, his defecting in the game really is not that big
of a deal as any soldier can defect.

Conway and Gates screw Washington - After a series of defeats, or just not
accomplishing anything at all, Thomas Conway and Horatio Gates will band
together with many representatives to try and remove Washington from power.
If it gets to this point, it will almost always succeed and Gates will become
C-C... incidentally, you will lose the game.  If it fails, which is very rare,
Washington's support in the government will still take an enormous hit.  One
way to avoid this is to just let Conway and Gates resign if they ever offer
it up.  


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                           Advantages of Each Side
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American Advantages

  - Start out with a few more regiments than the British
  - Start out with a few more districs than the British
  - Get Foreign Aid
  - European Officers offer their services
  - France and Spain can join
  - Can receive new regiments on any districts
  - Officers usually have higher stats than British ones

American Disadvantages

  - Virtually have to beat the British alone, as foreign powers join far too
    late to be of any real use.
  - Only start with districs in the north, green allies in the south quickly
    lose control of their territories.
  - Start with no fleets.

British Advantages

  - Get much larger budgets in the first several phases of the game
  - Regiments are usually armed better when they arrive
  - Can hire German Mercaneries [up to 20 all game] to greatly swing the 
    officer balance to their favor very early.
  - Get direct control over Northern and Southern districts on the first turn.
  - Start with great naval superiority.

British Disadvantages

  - Can only receive new regiments on sea accessible districts.
  - Get harder and harder to win with as the game progresses.
  - Automatically lose in 1820 when the King dies.
  - Regiments take months to arrive, whereas American ones may come the very
    next turn.
  - Loyalist Army [pink] is no match for the Revolutionary Army [Green].


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                                   Credits
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