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Aug 13, 09 at 6:11pmWhisperintheWind


http://www.suzannecollinsbooks.com/the_hunger_games_69765.htm

The Hunger Games, which is turning into a trilogy (second book coming out September 1st) is based off of a future where barbarism turns into entertainment.

Years ago, North America collapsed from floods, fires, droughts, earthquakes and other disasters and vanished from society. Then, a new country rose up from it's ashes called Panem. Panem, a land living off of tvs, was ruled by a Capitol that was surrounded by 13 districts. One day, the districts rose up against the Capitol in a riot, but they were defeated and the 13th district was destroyed.
A Treaty of Treason was then created, and in it required that as repentance, each year each of the 12 remaining districts would have to give tribute in the form of a teenage boy and girl between the age of 12 and 18. All 24 of the tributes would have to take part in the Hunger Games... the annual competition that is literally a fight to to death.
The kids are thrown into an arena that could be anything from a desert to a frozen wasteland and for a period of several weeks would have to learn to survive in harsh circumstances while the others, who've been trained to kill them, share the land with them. They fight to the death while being watched live on tv by all of the country of Panem - it's the law that you have to watch them die, break it and you could die yourself. The last kid standing alive wins, earning their district a year's worth supply of abundant food.

Katniss Everdeen loves her sister with all of her heart, and has been feeding her and her depressed mother for years after her father died by hunting illegally to keep them alive. On the day of the next Reaping, where names are chosen for the Games, Katniss's 12-year-old sister is chosen, and Katniss in a desperate attempt to save her, volunteers to take her place.

I thought this book was simply amazing, well written, suspenseful, sad, touching, but definitely a book worth reading.

Anybody else who has read or is interested in reading this book? Discussion?

Thread Recap (last 10 posts from newest to oldest)

Aug 10, 12 at 11:23am
Golden Miru warrior


quote Golden Miru warrior
I'm surprised you're still going on these Celes Leonhart. You'll hate Mockingjay so much.


Yeah shit terrible excuse for an ending.



Aug 10, 12 at 4:32am
Celes Leonhart


Tay Rex I thought the epilogue was completely redundant, and really frustrating. When I first read the title I thought at least all the knots would be tied, but literally all you get is "and then they had kids". If you're going to do a epilogue, do it properly: what happened to the state of the capital under Paylor's rule, what happened to Gale - did he come back or ever move on, Annie, Johanna, Haymitch, her mum, etc? If she wasn't prepared to do the full swing then don't do it at all, just end it on Katniss being overrun with hormones and finally accepting Peeta. Felt that the last couple chapters were too rushed and abrupt and everything the book built and developed was kind of forgotten to say "and they lived happily ever after".



Aug 10, 12 at 2:27am
Tay Rex


Celes Leonhart, how did you feel about the ending in particular? I found it to be very disappointing when I finished the series and thought it would have been better if Collins had just left the epilogue out and left it all to mystery. I didn't particularly care much for the love triangle (though I agree, I thought Peeta was a great character). I felt as though she should have left it on a cliffhanger. I personally found the series to be quite bracing and interesting with many cliffhangers so I was surprised when it didn't finish on one.




Aug 09, 12 at 3:15pm
Celes Leonhart


Golden Miru warrior I don't think I've ever experienced anything more infuriating in my entire life. Sped through the last 40% of this tonight praying for Peeta to return as a character, to some actual resolution. For some optimism, for some reason to care. And yet, versus all the breakdowns and whining narration, in face of the most important death in her life Katniss barely even notices? I felt genuine anger. Peeta carried this entire series for me and I didn't get anything out of it that I wanted.

If it's any credit, besides the obvious revelation that 13 was clearly the Capitol p.2, I was way off with my predictions and it was a much more pessimistic, much less resolved finish than I expected, and it caught me off guard.



Aug 01, 12 at 9:58am
Celes Leonhart


Yep, the arena design was one of the most exciting things for me. Really anticipated a complete dominance of the other competitors in the arena with the team they get established, but it's Collins' number one talent to remove Katniss from having to make any morally questionable decisions (always killing people self-defence, basically). Seemingly she can take down attack planes but can't hit an opponent a few meters away for anything better than a skim.

I initially read Catching Fire to make a point to someone but actually found myself enjoying the middle. I've made it this far and I'm still trying to make that same point so I might as well finish it. Hate literally every single thing about 13's design so far though; is there going to be some strong, metaphorical point about parallels between it and the Capitol or did she just run out of straws?

The worst bit is there's some design in 13 that's suspiciously similar my own (pretty bad) writing. If I'm mirroring Collins is probably time to go back to the scrap book.



Aug 01, 12 at 9:48am
Golden Miru warrior


I'm surprised you're still going on these Celes Leonhart. You'll hate Mockingjay so much. I think Catching Fire does a decent job of sustaining itself until the games, and while they're set up to be exciting and have a more interesting layout than the previous arena, the cop out that cuts it short was a shame.



Aug 01, 12 at 8:43am
Celes Leonhart


Finished Catching Fire a week back or so. A lot better than the first. The character cast was considerably better written than the first, and pretty much everybody involved besides the Careers I had genuine attachment to. Lots teary eye moments and lots of erect hair moments where I had some false sense of pride for a rebellion I had no part in. Still hate Katniss and still love Peeta so much. Biggest problem I had with it (beside narration) is I felt the Quell was too short and cut off too abruptly. You spend two thirds anticipating a lethal Games and then you don't really get one. I definitely would have pushed the games further - even if there was no more deaths, though there easily could have been; what could have been a fantastically exciting climax instead became almost a minor plot device. I also thought that the massive reveals were slightly too sudden, with like a dozen twists all sprang on you/Katniss within the one paragraph. Definitely could have worked the end much better.

Having started Mockingjay I'm very much less enthused though. Suddenly it seems like the series has lost itself and its identity a little bit. Not quite sure she planned this far ahead. Will see how it goes.



Jul 09, 12 at 1:46pm
Mainguy


quote Narphinean
I've definitely come across better-written female characters, and most definitely better-written child characters. Maybe you need to read a bit more out of the mainstream, yeah? Writing a child character doesn't give an author free rein to make them as bratty as possible. She does mature over the course of the series, true, but she still remains as flat and unremarkable as any other coming-of-age protagonist. Given time I could name at least a half dozen other characters who exhibit the same traits and growth as she does. It's really not hard to find them.

In the end Lyra's a product of her environment, and her impact on the story stems a good deal from a prophecy that she fulfills just by doing pretty much what she wants to. She doesn't exist on her own as a standalone character, and she's not at all unique. Now, if you had tried to argue that Mrs. Coulter was a well-written female character I could buy that... but since you settled on Lyra, I feel I have to question what you even believe good character writing is.

I see a lot of blanket terms and pretentious writing. Perhaps you should consider what you say a little more carefully before posting?

In the end Lyra's a product of her environment

Some of the strongest characters in modern media and literature follow this theme. When the reader observes a character changing and developing in reaction to their circumstance they do not usually say that the character is 'poorly written'. Would you say Biblo Baggins and Harry Potter are poorly written? Both are giants in the world of fantasy, and both undergo huge changes as a result of the dark and varying world they've been thrust into. Reminds me a little of Lyra. There are too many characters which are a product of their environment, yet develop in a rich and intruiging way, to list here. I'll leave you to think of a few, shouldn't take long.

She doesn't exist on her own as a standalone character, and she's not at all unique

Null points. A characters uniqueness is not essential for good writing; a reader desires someone they can relate to on multiple levels, a quality that does not depend on a persons exclusivity.
You'll find the standalone argument falls short as well. What makes a story interesting is how the characters slot into the circumstances, their response to their environment. Off the top of my head take Heath Ledger's joker, someone who many would agree is fantastically written. Now let's pop him in say, Apocalypse Now, and see how he stands up. Surely if he's a standalone character he'd function well in any situation right? Maybe you should email Francis Ford, see how he likes the idea....
A minority of characters are standalone.

Maybe you need to read a bit more out of the mainstream, yeah?

Ludicrous.

I feel I have to question what you even believe good character writing is

Likewise.



Jul 09, 12 at 12:53pm
Celes Leonhart


You go do that.



Jul 08, 12 at 11:05am
Narphinean


I've definitely come across better-written female characters, and most definitely better-written child characters. Maybe you need to read a bit more out of the mainstream, yeah? Writing a child character doesn't give an author free rein to make them as bratty as possible. She does mature over the course of the series, true, but she still remains as flat and unremarkable as any other coming-of-age protagonist. Given time I could name at least a half dozen other characters who exhibit the same traits and growth as she does. It's really not hard to find them.

In the end Lyra's a product of her environment, and her impact on the story stems a good deal from a prophecy that she fulfills just by doing pretty much what she wants to. She doesn't exist on her own as a standalone character, and she's not at all unique. Now, if you had tried to argue that Mrs. Coulter was a well-written female character I could buy that... but since you settled on Lyra, I feel I have to question what you even believe good character writing is.




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