Neoseeker : : : : Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 6TB Review

Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 6TB Review - PAGE 1

- Tuesday, August 5th, 2014 Like (1) Share






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Shadow of Death Aug 10, 14
This is kind of cool. Of course, give it a couple/few years and you'll be able to get a 6TB (though not 'enterprise' quality) drive for probably $200, if not less.

Still, considering the feature set and overall quality, $600 isn't too bad really.
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Wesstron Aug 11, 14
Actually you can get a consumer class 6TB drive for about $300 as we speak. However, if I really need a drive with that capacity, I would spend the $$$ for an enterprise class quality. Imagine the nightmare (and the cost) of losing or trying to recover close to 5500GB if the drive fails!
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The5thAvocado Aug 22, 14
I must be behind on the times, because 6TB sounds like an overly exorbitant amount of memory. The only thing I can see even coming close to that capacity would perhaps be the presumed entire Simpsons collection.
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Shadow of Death Aug 23, 14
quote The5thAvocado
I must be behind on the times, because 6TB sounds like an overly exorbitant amount of memory. The only thing I can see even coming close to that capacity would perhaps be the presumed entire Simpsons collection.
Some people are data hogs. Myself being one of them. I'm currently working on filling a 4TB external drive which I got not that long ago (I think a couple/few months?). It's already about 1/4 full. My previous two externals were 3TB models and they're both full now, pretty much (Bit remaining on one of them, but it's small sliver compared to the rest that's full.).

Granted, a good portion of that is raw game capture footage (FRAPS and Console Game captures).

Basically I could fill up 6TB within a year, no problem, so long as I had a few games to capture footage of.
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marketable Aug 27, 14
I prefer 6TB SSD,hahaha
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Randome Aug 27, 14
quote The5thAvocado
I must be behind on the times, because 6TB sounds like an overly exorbitant amount of memory. The only thing I can see even coming close to that capacity would perhaps be the presumed entire Simpsons collection.
If I could, I'd keep a copy of every episode of every good series and every good movie, but realistically, I'd keep it all on a bunch of DVDs for the obvious benefit of reliability.

I guess it could be useful for someone who wants to create a single giant file.

Also, a mere 6 TB hard drive? Pff... That is so yesterdays news. Seagate just released an 8 TB hard drive: http://www.seagate.com/about/newsroom/press-releases/Seagate-ships-worlds-first-8TB-hard-drives-pr-master/

leochan
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harbin Aug 27, 14
TBH years ago 1TB would've been seen as exorbitant. Now it's seen as necessary because of how much data is stored on here now. I've got a 1.5TB that is completely full (blame emulators, digitisation of music and movies and collecting junk for that, alongside some VPCs). In a few years time, 4TB will probably be seen the same way.

Convenience of digitally storing music and movies is great but at the same time it doesn't replace my desire to own a physical copy. If the file gets corrupted, I can rerip it in a format of my choice with a quality of my choice, and at the moment, some films require major compressing for file size reasons as it can take awhile to read a 4gb movie on others or stream it over the network. Until other companies catch up though, stuff like 6 and 8TB drives (which previously you would've needed a NAS bay and controllers to hit that storage) will be priced out of consumer markets. Unless you run a home media centre with everything digitised though, can't see the need for 8TB atm, though it would be nice to own that on one drive. Hell to backup and defragment though. XD

Can see the need in enterprise conditions though. Saves power on less drives, makes management easier and can store more company data.
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Randome Aug 27, 14
A few decades ago a 1 GB hard drive was a large machine about the size of two large computer cases. Now a tiny silicone chip can do it.

Funny old memory devices: http://royal.pingdom.com/2008/04/08/the-history-of-computer-data-storage-in-pictures/
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