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CPU & Chipset Lapping Guide - PAGE 1

- Tuesday, April 30th, 2002 Like Share


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Gxcad Apr 30, 02
I think this article is well done. It is explained well but not excessively and seems to cover all common questions that may arise. Add to that some nice pictures and there ya are. I think it could of used some real world results, such as before and after temps to prove lapping helps, and by how much. Think I learned something, might try it:).

-Gxcad
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Redemption Apr 30, 02
What's the theoretical performance boost you can get from lapping of the heatsink? Like how many degrees have people been getting?
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Monk May 1, 02
Well done! I'd only suggest to be very careful with your efforts, cause if you produce the slightest "bump" in the surface which isn't necessarely detected by eye, the results will be much worse.
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Gxcad May 16, 02
Redemption, I have heard one result of lapping as 2c temp drop, I suppose it does work if the heatsink is not perfect to begin with, but probably no point in a well made heatsink (especially swiftech). I believe the report I got is on a Zalman flower style cooler but I may be wrong.

-Gxcad
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dgeake Sep 17, 07
I will add a few tips to this thread on lapping heatsinks.

Rather than taping the sandpaper to your flat surface, just use a little water (no soap) to hold the paper to the surface.

Before beginning, slightly bevel the edges of the heatsink. This will help prevent tearing the sandpaper.

As you advance through the grits, be sure to clean the heatsink and your work area so no coarser grit left from previous stages can mar the finish.

When using finer grit paper, add just a touch of dishwashing detergent to the water on the surface of the paper. It reduces chatter while lapping the heatsink.

Look at a reflection of graph paper in the base of the heatsink to get guage the flatness of the heatsink base.

Suitable sandpaper and metal polish can be obtained at most autoparts stores.

Going beyond 800 grit is probably overkill, but it looks so cool to end up with a flat mirror finish on your heatsink.
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Iceguy2003 Sep 17, 07
My favorite quote of the article:

quote
Now if you follow up all of this work by putting thermal tape or anything like that on this beauty I will have to jump through this screen and slap you. ONLY use high quality thermal paste.
I actually lol'd.

I might try this on the stock Intel C2D heatsink, as it is probably cheaply made. As far as my other rig (3400+) with an XP-90, I think it must be high quality. Now that the house has been around 70 - 72C that the weather has cooled off, I'm hardly hitting 40C under max load. Woot for the old XP-90. Might still be worth trying on it, but I'd hate to make the temps higher. I think I'll try it on the stock intel Core 2 Duo heatsink, though. Nice write-up. BTW, I assume this will be turned into a sticky?
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The Slayer Sep 17, 07
Good artical, but it was written in 2002, so I doubt it will get stickied. I never though to sand down a heatsink...
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Anonymous Sep 17, 07
I've heard a number of people talk about a concave factory heatsink on their stock C2D set-up. Something of this nature seems to have been resurrected at an appropriate time.
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